Cookies and Chrome

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Daveski17, Nov 22, 2014.

  1. Mayahana

    Mayahana Banned

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    Incognito often won't block super, enhanced, zombie cookies, persistent, and or fingerprint cookies from ISPs.

    When writing takes place outside of cache, some of these won't work.
     
  2. apathy

    apathy Registered Member

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    Supercookie/Evercookies are cookies that are always on your machine put there through various browser exploits. The aren't like regular cookies.. You can test your browser using this website.

    Here's more info:
    Evercookie is designed to make persistent data just that, persistent. By storing the same data in several locations that a client can access, if any of the data is ever lost (for example, by clearing cookies), the data can be recovered and then reset and reused.

    Simply think of it as cookies that just won't go away.

    Evercookie is a javascript API available that produces extremely persistent cookies in a browser. Its goal is to identify a client even after they've removed standard cookies, Flash cookies (Local Shared Objects or LSOs), and others.

    Evercookie accomplishes this by storing the cookie data in several types of storage mechanisms that are available on the local browser. Additionally, if Evercookie has found the user has removed any of the types of cookies in question, it recreates them using each mechanism available.

    An Evercookie is not merely difficult to delete. It actively "resists" deletion by copying itself in different forms on the user's machine and resurrecting itself if it notices that some of the copies are missing or expired.
     
  3. Pharao

    Pharao Registered Member

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    With private mode enabled nothing should be stored except for cookies set via active content.
    Since you are claiming the opposite, let us know where those super-enhanced-zombie cookies get stored.
    BTW, what is a "fingerprint cookie"? :)
     
  4. AutoCascade

    AutoCascade Registered Member

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    I have 1st party cookies, scripts and frames with blocked with uMatrix along with anything else except on sites I trust. PPAPI Flash is disabled except when I want to watch a news or Sports video.

    I don't even have Java or Silverlight on my machine.
     
  5. Pharao

    Pharao Registered Member

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    Neither do I.
    As for uMatrix , I'm not a Chrome/Chromium user. :)
     
  6. AutoCascade

    AutoCascade Registered Member

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    There isn't a fingerprint cookie. That refers to browser fingerprinting or social media fingerprinting. The more unique your browser is the easier they can track you.

    The EFF has created a site that can tell you how unique your browser 'fingerprint' is. They also claim that they will add things to their 'privacy badger' extension for Chrome to make fingerprinting more difficult.

    https://panopticlick.eff.org/

    A good blog post describing this here:

    https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2014/07/28/panopticlick-reveals-the-cookie-you-cant-delete/
     
  7. Pharao

    Pharao Registered Member

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    I know but it would have been funny to get some 'expert' replies. :)

    Chrome? Google and privacy, that must be something like sexual pleasure inside the Vatican. ;)

    Or this.
     
  8. AutoCascade

    AutoCascade Registered Member

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    That's an interesting link.
     
  9. AutoCascade

    AutoCascade Registered Member

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    One of the short comings of Chrome's cookie management is that it seems as though when you make an exception on one website for a third party cookie it then allows it 100% of the time - it's a universal exception rather than per site.

    If you look at Ghostery for Firefox and compare the feature set versus Ghostery for Chrome it is like night and day. I had asked at one time whether Ghostery for Chrome would ever support cookie control and the answer was a flat out NO.
     
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