Connecting PCs to new wired network

Discussion in 'hardware' started by JEAM, Oct 1, 2019.

  1. JEAM

    JEAM Registered Member

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    I'm adding a secondary router to our Verizon FiOS router in order to isolate certain computers from the rest of the network. My question is: will I need to turn off the computers that are to reside on this secondary network, or can I simply leave them turned on, plugging them into the secondary router (after setting it up) and they'll find the new network without complications?

    In case it matters, three points:
    1. There will be NO wireless connections anywhere
    2. All computers are running Windows (various flavors), except for one that's Linux
    3. The proposed arrangement is as follows:
    ONT --> FiOS G-1100 Gateway router
    FioS router Ethernet LAN port 1 --> network switch --> PCs on 'main' network (unchanged)
    FioS router Ethernet LAN port 2 --> secondary router --> other network switch --> PCs on 'secondary' network

    The secondary router (a TP-Link TL-R470T+) would be connected from its WAN port to the second Ethernet port on the FiOS router.

    The only difference between this new arrangement and the current one is the addition of the secondary router; right now, LAN port 2 on the FiOS router is connected to that other network switch.

    So, to repeat, the question has to do with whether I need to turn off the PCs that will go on the secondary network and then turn them back on once the secondary router is set up and all the Ethernet cables are hooked up; or whether I can leave the PCs turned on and they'll just find the new network when I move the connection from the FiOS router to the TP-Link router.

    Thanks a bunch for any help/tips.
     
  2. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    They should just connect when you attach the cables.
     
  3. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    You might need to do a simple reboot so they can pickup their new IP address assignment.
     
  4. JEAM

    JEAM Registered Member

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    Thanks, so I'll first make the switch with the PCs still turned on, and then reboot if needed. :thumb:
     
  5. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Or click on the network connection icon in the tray, and disconnect/reconnect.

    Or in Linux root terminal:
    Code:
    ifdown eth0
    ifup eth0
    Or in Windows:
    Code:
    ipconfig /renew
     
  6. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Which reboots the computer anyway.
     
  7. JEAM

    JEAM Registered Member

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  8. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Huh? I've never seen that. Is it a new thing in Windows?
     
  9. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Great! Glad it worked and thanks for posting your followup.
    Ummm, pretty sure its been that way for many years. I only have W10 here but if you click the network icon (there is no disconnect/reconnect, BTW) and click on "Status", you will see the option "Network reset". Follow the prompts and you will see the following,
     
  10. xxJackxx

    xxJackxx Registered Member

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    Not a Windows 10 option. The simplest advice I would give would be if it doesn't just work, reboot. A network reset may have you looking for drivers with no network access to download them if they are not included in Windows 10. Not an issue for most modern hardware but not a fun day if you require drivers that need to be installed from the manufacturer.
     
  11. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    @Bill_Bright -- Ah. Learned something. Never used Windows 10. Seems like a horrible change.

    But the ipconfig command still works, right?
     
  12. Seer

    Seer Registered Member

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    ipconfig's still there.
    I believe mirimir was referring to disable/enable network adapter. That would prompt DHCP to issue an address to a NIC. Maybe disconnect/connect was once there, on XP, can't remember.
    But even this should not be needed, a cable reconnect would also set ARP in action.
     
  13. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Not at all. W10 is much better in almost every way - once you get used to the changes.
    I know - but he said through the system tray icon.
     
  14. Seer

    Seer Registered Member

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    He did. And you can access the NIC by r-clicking a tray icon -> 'Network & Internet setttings' -> 'Change adapter options'. It's a bit of a long path but I kept this habit from XP days where you had one click less to access the NIC. iirc.
    But I generally share your sentiments regarding W10.
     
  15. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Yeah, you are right. You can disable it from there. My mistake. Worth a try.
     
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