Computer IPv6 addresses & privacy

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by lotuseclat79, Nov 9, 2011.

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  1. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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    Computer IPv6 addresses & privacy.

    Note: At the end of the article there is a section entitled: IPv6 useful websites

    -- Tom
     
  2. CloneRanger

    CloneRanger Registered Member

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    @ lotuseclat79

    Hi, thanks for posting :thumb:

    Isn't that the same for IPv4 too ? My 1st two numbers seem to remain the same, but the other two change every time i connect !

    Well worth knowing for the future :) :thumb:
     
  3. Heimdall

    Heimdall Registered Member

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    Whilst there are similarities, there are also major differences in how the addresses are constructed . With IPv4, an address is typically broken down into 3 segments, simply by bit manipulation:

    Network ID
    Subnet ID
    Node ID

    The Network ID is unlikely to change unless you do a lot of roaming, likewise the subnet ID. The Node ID, however, is subject to change each time you reboot your PC/router, where dynamically allocated addresses are used.

    The 'privacy', or not, of IPv6 addresses may well be a issue, particularly for those who are unwittingly using IPv6, for many, however, there are few differences between the visibility of a static IPv6 address and a static IPv4 address. In my situation for example, my 'dynamically allocated' IPv4 address hadn't changed for several months, simply because of the way my ISP works.

    I now have a static IPv4 address but that's a different story and my IPv6 is via a HE tunnel, at least until my ISP get's their act together, which hopefully will be quite soon.
     
  4. BoerenkoolMetWorst

    BoerenkoolMetWorst Registered Member

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    Interesting, thanks :)
    I find it strange however that in the complete post of his website he mentions more accurate geolocation as an advantage and not a privacy concern:
     
  5. Dude111

    Dude111 Registered Member

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    This isnt always true..... I HAVE HAD THE SAME IP FOR 6 MONTHS NOW AT LEAST! (And i shutdown when im done)
     
  6. caspian

    caspian Registered Member

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    It says "No IPv6 address detected", but I am connected to Cryptohippie. I'll have to give this a try with my bare connection.
     
  7. Heimdall

    Heimdall Registered Member

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    If you're running one of the tests linked to in the article, you'll only get a positive result if you're using a valid routeable IPv6 address. If you only have a link local address (starts with fe80) you don't have IPv6 Internet connectivity.
     
  8. CloneRanger

    CloneRanger Registered Member

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    @ Heimdall

    I was convinced i'd posted several days ago to thank you for yours, what happened to it ?

    Anyway :thumb:
     
  9. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    If I'm on the road in a strange city, looking for XYZ with my smartphone, and operating as my true identity, more accurate geolocation is a good thing. If I'm wanting to be private, it's a bad thing. I would not use routable IPv6 without privacy extensions.
     
  10. Warlockz

    Warlockz Registered Member

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    Something I seen on iPredator page, thought I would share in this thread, I know its old news but someone might get something out of it?

     
  11. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    Hackers target IPv6 by Susan Perschke.​
     
  12. inka

    inka Registered Member

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    The quoted statement is untrue; er, it's misleading, at least.

    A user connected through a NAT router certainly isn't "assigned a new IPv4 address by his ISP" each time he reboots...

    ...and, I've repeatedly found that when I want to FORCE the issuance of a fresh IP address, by performing a DHCP release / renew at the router, or by power cycling the router and cable modem... the ISP's DHCP server reissues the SAME address. Even after 3-5 days of inactivity (all devices unplugged while we are out of town) yep, upon reconnect, same ol' IP address is assigned.

    The intended audience of that article probably wasn't us wee folk ~~ end users.
    As an end user, I would turn that statement on its head.

    "If you ISPs think you can simply turn off IPv4, I trust you're prepared to finance
    the replacement of the collective end users' suddenly-obsolete IPv4-only equipment."
     
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