Changing Ip address -help needed

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by raakii, Dec 5, 2008.

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  1. raakii

    raakii Registered Member

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    The ip address of my network does not change on modem reboot ,does not change on disconnecting the ethernet wire.I am on a dynamic ip provider .

    The ip only changes on complete system restart .It does not change on using the follow commands

    ipconfig/release

    ipconfig/renew

    Is there any way to change the ip address without going through complete computer restart?
     
  2. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    Dec 23, 2005
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    You mean your WAN assigned by your isp? A modem reboot (dsl/cable) you mean? FYI, many ISP's supply you with a PPOE connection or similar. Your modem restarting then requests an IP. There is a 'lease time' for an issigned IP, for example maybe 48hrs. Your modem will reacquire or be reassigned an IP (WAN) from your ISP then. Rebooting forces it.

    Now if you talk of your NIC's IP, if your modem is supplying a DHCP address (perhaps it is a modem/router or a router), the same thing applies. Rebooting the device gives out new addys. However, the 'lease time' may not be up, and the router/modem just leaves your NIC address assigned because it is still valid.

    Some ISP's give you an internal NAT addy. Meaning, say your ISP has 100 WAN IP addys. But they have 300 subscribers. Each subscriber (you) cannot have one of the WAN IP addys, or only 100 would be on at a time. So they have an internal set of IP's, and you get one of those. Those may be static or dynamic. Meaning, just because your modem gets a WAN does not mean it is really a WAN at all, but a LAN addy inside the ISP, which is then NAT'd to the real WAN's. Make sense?

    I used to be with an ISP that gave me a WAN that was in thier LAN. I had wierd issues at times, and could never host a game with my static WAN because it was not really a live WAN. I switched to an ISP that gives me a true static IP WAN address. Now I can host a server or whatever because it is a live IP on the internet.

    Narrow down your options. Access your modem or modem/router. See what it's assigned IP is. Then reboot it, see if it changes. There are settings in the modem/router that dictate how it assigns addys to your NIC. Check those too.

    Then post back which IP you are questioning. Is it your NIC addy? Is this the same as the WAN? Is your WAN for your modem/router really a WAN, or a LAN within your ISP?

    Sul.
     
  3. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    Perhaps your nic has a static ip? You can check this in the network adapters properties. You can assign a different one if it is. Or you can change to DHCP. Or you can use from command prompt the netsh tool as well. You might also run from command prompt ipconfig. And there are other ways as well. Using netsh is my favorite because there is no reboot if you change gateways or dns servers.

    Sul.
     
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