Can pre-installed programs in Win 7 Pro be uninstalled?

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Uitlander, Nov 28, 2020.

  1. Uitlander

    Uitlander Registered Member

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    So as not to get caught up in M$ semantics, I define 'uninstall' as in the Recommended Answer here:

    https://support.google.com/android/thread/25757292?hl=en

    The M$ definition (disable, turn-off, hide from view, play pretend the component is no longer in the OS) will not be used in this post. So the question becomes...is there a way to actually remove, delete, and eradicate a pre-installed component (say games, WMP, NetMeeting, etc.) from Win 7 Pro? If so, how?
     
  2. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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  3. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    Yes it'll probably involve editing the registry. Can be dicey & screw up Windows 7. A LONG time ago I did some severe registry editing that worked out. Other times I had to restore images.
     
  4. A_mouse

    A_mouse Registered Member

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    The things you mention are optional and can be excluded when doing a fresh install.

    To remove or install from the "Windows Features" list, go to the Programs and Features control panel, then on the left side of the list, click on "Turn Windows features on or off".
    Untick anything you no longer want.
     
  5. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    I believe that doesn't fit OP definition of uninstall.
     
  6. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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    I think it does, as the components are actually uninstalled if they are unchecked.
     
  7. A_mouse

    A_mouse Registered Member

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    Indeed all the components should be removed, and to re-enable will need the install media.
    Even old XP has this feature.
     
  8. Uitlander

    Uitlander Registered Member

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    Yeah, turning on/off is not actual uninstalling. When you uninstall a app it is no longer on/in the OS, and if you want it back, you have to re-install it. This is just M$ semantics of 'let's play pretend you got rid of it, but it is really just stored away...out of sight...out of mind'.
     
  9. Uitlander

    Uitlander Registered Member

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    If you uninstall Firefox, it is gone, and no longer taking up any space on the hard drive, registry, etc. If you turn on/off Windows games, NetMeeting, or whatever, it is not gone, it is still taking up space, and is merely hidden away, awaiting to be turned on. So no, this is M$ word games of trying to re-define 'uninstall'. Anyway, I'll assume the answer to my question is 'no'...Windows 7 is an 'as-is', take it or leave it deal where one can turn so-called features on or off, but never really be rid of them. Since it seems I have to upgrade to Win 7, guess I'll have to live with that. Thanks for the reply, even if it was not what I wanted to hear. Better to know a bitter truth than to waste time and effort chasing a dead-end.
     
  10. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    I knew I had my reading glasses on.
     
  11. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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    Unless you have very limited storage space, I don't know why that would matter.
     
  12. Brummelchen

    Brummelchen Registered Member

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    some components are still present even if the feature is uninstalled or disabled. dont ask me why, try to kill if you dare the consequences.

    Windows 7 is very different from XP which you used before. It is much easier to kill it when going into deep. Less action is more stability!
     
  13. Uitlander

    Uitlander Registered Member

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    All storage space is limited. A 1TB hard drive is still limited to 1 TB. When items are no longer of use to some, they stick it in the closet, and when the closets are full, they start filling up the basement, and when that is full the attic is next, then rooms start filling up, and at that point the 'Hoarders' TV show comes calling. I used to have that problem, but long since learned the dumpster is my ally. I don't store junk I don't use anymore, as a rule, but guess I'll have to deal with it for Win 7. Not happy about it, but life is full of little disappointments. Guess if it grates on my nerves too much, I can always accelerate my move to Linux.

    Aside from pack-ratting useless components, there is also the question of security issues such useless stuff bring...so far as I know, anything that I can turn off, a hacker can turn back on remotely. So long as the component is there, it remains a potential threat. While I credit the NAT & SPI of my router for the lions share of keeping my XP Pro bulletproof over the last 3+ years, it is just as possible that using XPLite to whittle XP Pro down to around 950MB deserves some credit. When a component like IRC is nuked, so to are all the exploits dependent on it.
     
  14. Uitlander

    Uitlander Registered Member

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    Well, I have no clue how to "try", so guess I'll have to learn to live with M$ bloatware and useless junk. Yeah, I've acquired a few books on Win 7, and I'm seeing just how different it is, and not liking what I'm reading. Seems I'll be going from a happy XP fan to a disgruntled Win 7 user.
     
  15. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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    Many people will never use anywhere near that much storage space on their computers, in which case 1TB of storage, may be many more gigs that they actually need. I wouldn't call that limited.
    Well they could do that. But once someone already has access to your computer, I highly doubt that would waste time enabling Windows features, you have disabled. In any case, the best option is to not get infected. Thankfully, with just a little of bit of care, it is extremely hard to get infected.
     
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