BSD?

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by sosaiso, Apr 27, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Posts:
    601
    Okay, now that I have been running Linux for a few days, I have gotten bored, and started reading about OpenBSD, FreeBSD, and netBSD.

    I've read that Linux is a clone of BSD(Unix), and that BSDs have core teams reviewing the code and what not. This seems to be a plus argument.

    Is BSD simpler to use than Linux? Are there any other advantages or disadvantages?

    My readings have shown that installation is free, which is good, and that support is available. Which of the three is easiest to be used? Program incompatibilities? Will I be able to run windows equivilent software?
     
  2. TNT

    TNT Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Posts:
    948
    No, all the three major BSDs (FreeBSD, OpenBSD and NetBSD) are generally harder than Linux (for people who use Windows). Not because their commands and shell are harder, but rather because generally none of the teams behind them wanted to get into the workstation world, and definitely none of them tried to emulate Windows. They have less graphical tools, generally stricter code analysis than Linux (and less security bugs), less "desktop" programs (though quite a bit can be ported from Linux to BSD).

    I personally use OpenBSD. FreeBSD is considered the most user-friendly, NetBSD the most compatible with hardware, and OpenBSD the most secure.

    I don't think many would want to run OpenBSD on a worstation like I do. All the BSDs are much more targeted at the server world; they are unbelievably rock-solid and stable systems, and very secure.
     
  3. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Posts:
    1,160
    Location:
    127.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
    PCBSD and desktopbsd are great for starting out in BSD, pc especially. I like it a lot(run it in vmware player a lot). Installing apps is friggin easy, easier than windows. You just download a program from pcbsd's package website, double click it, and it installs.

    Try it, you might like it.

    Alphalutra1
     
  4. bktII

    bktII Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Posts:
    224
    Alphalutra1,

    Thanks for the info. on PC-BSD and DesktopBSD. Reviews on both are generally good, although both are relatively new "on the scene".

    Just ordered the CD for DesktopBSD. Looking forwared to trying it out.

    bktII
     
  5. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Posts:
    601
    Ah, many thanks for the responses. I think I might try DesktopBSD on my VMware in the near future.

    But I was looking for more programs than was offered in linux. After hearing that Mac was built on this platform, I was hoping that all Mac programs would work on the BSD.

    And the quest continues for a Windows replacement. :T
     
  6. dallen

    dallen Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Posts:
    824
    Location:
    United States
    Going back to the first posting in this thread...can you tell me if Linux is a good replacement for Windows. I know that "good" is relative and subjective, basically, I want to know if it is wise for someone like myself (a moderately advanced user, but only ever used Windows) to experiment with Linux. My main concerns are about hardware. Will my printer, scanner, videocard, soundcard, etc. work? What are some of the main differences I should expect to see? Will all or any of my programs work? I see there are many, many versions of Linux. Which is best for me?
     
  7. dog [away]

    dog [away] Guest

    There are generic drivers for most hardware, and most will work without issue. Sometimes you'll have to seek out drivers outside of those provided in the distro. The only issue, I've experienced is with my "old" all in one ... the printer workers without issue (but I had to search out a driver) ... but the scanner does not - although I've never searched for a solution either (as it isn't a need really). There are generic video card drivers for just about every available card - minus 3d acceleration (but linux isn't about games anyway).

    As for which distro ... For a first timer I'd suggest Mandriva or SuSE, as they have best graphical installers. Ubuntu has the best support/guidance for new users, but the installation is a little harder - but regardless of distro there are tons of Howto's available on the net. The only way you'll know if it's for you is to give it a whirl - nothing ventured, nothing gained. I wouldn't go back to Windows ... for what it's worth.

    Linux can be a steep learning curve ... but you have to stick with ... and the lights will eventually all go on. As for your programs ... you'll have to find the linux equivalents. ;)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 30, 2006
  8. dog [away]

    dog [away] Guest

  9. Upasaka

    Upasaka Guest


    Try this site(posted by Aigle in another thread about Linux)............

    http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/

    A useful way of checking options in Linux tailored to your needs.

    Having taken the "test" a couple of times Mandriva and Xandros appear at the top of the list...............the Xandros site seems more user friendly and I like the look of Xandros better.

    As for BSD I have been looking at PCBSD with VMWARE Player and it looks good.
     
  10. clansman77

    clansman77 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Posts:
    234
    Location:
    kochi,kerala,india
    @dallen
    gnu/linux was a better replacement for me for windows.ofcourse that varies from person to person and depends on your requirements.i think there is no harm for you for you to experiment with linux provided you research a lil about linux and stuff.
    to know about hardware support you can try out with live cds of linux and see whether it recognises your hardware.there are several ones available ,knoppix,simply mepis,ubuntu etc to name a few..a live cd wont install anything to your harddrive . you boot from the cd into linux..different distros differ in hardware detection capabilities and if doesnot work for a person then some other distro will...

    two interesting threads discussing about linux here in wilders that you may look into.there are some good links there..
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=126881
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=128766

    choosing the distro/version that is good for you is like choosing an antivirus /firewall.you go with the distro that works best for you.i personally use ubuntu coz it has excellent support forums,good hardware detection,lightweight,good software repositories,free in the true sense,and a new version is out every 6 months..it is good for novices too..
    suse,mandriva,ubuntu,knoppix,linspire,mepis,kanotix etc are verygood for novices.my suggestion is u first try out either knoppix/kanotix/mepis/ubuntu live cds,to just know how linux feels.then u can either install any of these or u can install mandriva/suse...
     
  11. bktII

    bktII Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Posts:
    224
    dallen,

    Here is a link (there are others out there) "Linux software equivalent to Windows software":

    http://wiki.linuxquestions.org/wiki/Linux_software_equivalent_to_Windows_software

    Probably not complete, but a decent place to start.

    If you have a broadband internet connection, experimenting with distributions will be a cinch as you just download the distro, burn to CD/DVD and install. I have a dial-up connection so am limited to ordering CD/DVDs. Here are a couple of sites where you can order them for free:

    Ubuntu https://shipit.ubuntu.com/
    Fedora Core http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Distribution/FreeMedia

    So far, Ubuntu has worked out very well on both my Compaq notebook and HP desktop. I also tried Linspire, audio worked fine for CDs, etc., but I could not get streaming audio to work. I found Fedora Core to be more challenging than Ubuntu, so you may want to hold off on it.

    A word of caution, if you currenlty have a disk partitioning and imaging solution, I would recommend that you first image your Windows partition prior to doing anything. Then, you can shrink (or reduce) your Windows partition size, creating free space for the Linux install. If you do not want to dual-boot, you can ignore partitioning software. There are some good threads here at Wilders regarding disk partitioning and imaging software.

    bktII
     
  12. bktII

    bktII Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Posts:
    224
  13. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Posts:
    601
    Those looking for the usability/support of ubuntu might want to look into kubuntu as well. I'm trying that on my rig without too many problems, and it has a shiny interface that is very similar to windows. Bless you KDE. :D
     
  14. bktII

    bktII Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Posts:
    224
    Regarding BSD desktop OSs, both DesktopBSD and PC-BSD use KDE, K Desktop Environment.

    I have read good reviews of Kubuntu. There are plenty of "religious wars" out there in the Linux world regarding KDE vs. GNOME vs. others. This is not significant for me. When I used Linspire for 2-3 months I was a KDE user and had no problems with it. I moved from Linspire because of other issues. On Ubuntu and Fedora Core, I currently use GNOME and have no problems with it.

    bktII
     
  15. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Posts:
    601
    Hi, bktII, I was wondering what the Fedora Core had to offer. If it is getting offtopic here, I have started a thread about Linux distros in this forum as well.

    As for KDE vs Gnome, I was under the impression that one could install both. I just like KDE because it looks prettier. :T
     
  16. clansman77

    clansman77 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Posts:
    234
    Location:
    kochi,kerala,india
    i like gnome coz eyecandy isnt important to me its performance and usability..
     
  17. clansman77

    clansman77 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Posts:
    234
    Location:
    kochi,kerala,india
    also fedora core 5 version has been released.fedora has gnome as default interface..
     
  18. iceni60

    iceni60 ( ^o^)

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2004
    Posts:
    5,116
    i think if you like KDE then you should definitely try MEPIS, they have just started using Ubuntu as the starting point then they build on it from there. it should be like Kubuntu but with more software and better media support.
     
  19. dog

    dog Guest

    I find wine a little too buggy ... :( But in all fairness I gave up playing with it rather shortly; only because I found more than suitable replacements, hence the motivation wasn't there for me.
     
  20. aigle

    aigle Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Posts:
    11,047
    Location:
    Saudi Arabia/ Pakistan
    What is the main difference in Linux and BSD? Somewhere I see these as 2 different OS and on distrowatch I see BSD as a flavour of linux!
     
  21. TNT

    TNT Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Posts:
    948
    BSD is not a flavour of Linux. All the Linux operating systems are called Linux because they use the Linux kernel, none of the BSD uses the Linux kernel. BSD is the evolution of the original Berkeley Unix:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BSD
     
  22. IMM

    IMM Spyware Fighter

    Joined:
    May 6, 2004
    Posts:
    351
    It could be argued that Linux would never have caught on, or perhaps Torvalds wouldn't have written his kernel, if the courts and AT&T hadn't held up Berkeley's release of the BSD source for so long.
     
  23. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Posts:
    601
    Would that be a bad thing?

    Linux and BSD developers working together for a stable desktop enviroment.

    What if indeed...
     
  24. iceni60

    iceni60 ( ^o^)

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2004
    Posts:
    5,116
    they don't need to work together. Linux is already more stable then windows, it's just abit more difficult to setup. that's the reason google runs on it and 70% of servers run *nix - because it's more stable. just imagine what it would be like if servers didn't run on *nix :ouch:
     
  25. TNT

    TNT Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Posts:
    948
    Yes, and the BSDs are more stable than Linux. :p
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.