Boot CD's computer specific??

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by adr58, Oct 24, 2005.

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  1. adr58

    adr58 Registered Member

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    Can I use an Acronis 8 boot CD that has been created by one computer on another computer? I don't have a floppy drive, only a DVD-ROM. I don't know if the files are specific to the computer or not.

    TIA
     
  2. tachyon42

    tachyon42 Registered Member

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    You can use on another computer - of course, you need to buy another license if you intend to continue using TI on the original computer.
     
  3. gue_st

    gue_st Guest

    Are you affiliated with Acronis? Are you a lawyer ?

    If yes, I would like an answer to some questions.
    What does it mean "using software" ?
    Normally it would mean installing it on the computer. Is there any other interpretation?
    So, installing it on one computer and using recovery disk on other would be a violation of license agreement? Why?
    If yes, would it be a violation to use recovery disk on several computers without installing it on any of them?
    If yes, what if you remove disks from other computers and backup them on that one where TI is installed?

    Until you or anybody else will prove opposite, or it will be clearly stated in the license agreement, "using software" should probably still mean installing it.
     
  4. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    Acronis have mde it clear in this forum in the past that you need a license for every separate computer the program is *used* on. Note used, not installed. So say you only use a boot CD, for every distinct machine you boot from it, you need a distinct license.

    I believe the license says "you may not use the software on more than a single machine, even if you own or lease all of them without the written consent of Acronis". However, I agree with you that if you were to fit hard drives from different machines in turn to a single machine and run TI there, then this would count as one machine and require just one license.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2005
  5. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello adr58,

    Thank you for choosing Acronis Disk Backup Software.

    Acronis Bootable CD is build-scpecific, not system-specific. It means that if you purchase the second license of Acronis True Image you will be able to use the same CD on the second computer and you will not need to create another CD.

    Thank you.
    --
    Irina Shirokova
     
  6. PaulB2005

    PaulB2005 Registered Member

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    I believe there was a post last week where someone was trying to clone one machine to many and they found the image would only work on the original machine. Even after using SYSPREP etc.

    TI is only licensed to image and recovery one machine - not to be used to clone a machine unless you buy further licenses.
     
  7. gue_st

    gue_st Guest

    I do not agree. Written document (license agreement) does not change from what Acronis is saysing in the forum.

    First, it is even not clear, is Boot CD that "software" mentioned in license agreement. Most likely, not. I cannot see how the same agreement could be applied to two different softwares, even one is created by other. Like, you will notice that there is another license agreement on PowerPoint presentation CD, if it contains PP player.

    Second - even if it would be that "software" and you really can use it only on one machine, in legal terms using software (boot CD) on two machines wold mean creating several CD's and then using them on diferent machines. If I use my ONE boot CD occasionally on my machines (without installing) and do not use it commercially, I do not see how it would be illegal.
     
  8. PaulB2005

    PaulB2005 Registered Member

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    It's simple.

    True Image is licensed to be used on one machine and one machine only per license, commercially or privately.

    Whether you agree or not is neither here nor there.
     
  9. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    That is your choice, but it doesn't magically make you right.

    If you want a definitive answer (which by the way is just common sense) just ask it of Acronis here.
     
  10. crofttk

    crofttk Registered Member

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    I don't recall precisely but that person may well have been using the Enterprise or Server edition of ATI which is something entirely different license-wise and, accordingly, price-wise.;)
     
  11. Menorcaman

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

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    Hello gue_st,

    Perhaps we could ask you the same question that you asked tachyon42 in post #3 above, namely are you a lawyer (and I'm not talking about the "barrack room" variety!!)? If not then, surely, what you've been saying throughout this thread is nothing more than your inexpert opinion?

    I suggest that Acronis, like any other software house, will have cleared their End User Licenses through their Legal Advisors before publishing them.

    Regards
     
  12. gue_st

    gue_st Guest

    Yes, I am actually waiting for Acronis comment.

    But it would be better if there was a comment from a lawyer, because we are bind by license agreement text, not Acronis interpretation.

    If about common sense, it is really hard to connect it with that "IN NO EVENT SHALL ACRONIS OR ITS VENDORS BE LIABLE FOR" thing :D
     
  13. Menorcaman

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

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    I can assure you that inserting a contract/license clause that seeks to exclude "consequential losses" is common sense for any business lawyer. Punters like you and me might not like it but I'm afraid it's a fact of life.

    Regards
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2005
  14. David Campen

    David Campen Registered Member

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    Well, that certainly reduces the value of TI. You are saying that if my computer failed that I couldn't use my recovery CD to restore an image to another computer? Seems like yet another reason to look for a different recovery software vendor.
     
  15. MKairys

    MKairys Registered Member

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    That's a very good question. Acronis Support, perhaps you could say something here?
     
  16. crofttk

    crofttk Registered Member

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    Until Acronis Support responds, I'll offer this:

    1) I would think that you CAN restore to a new machine as long as you never use it again on the old machine

    2) HOWEVER, if you restore to a new machine, realize that you may be restoring an operating system that was installed in and built at install time based on probably completely different hardware and you'll be lucky to have any functionality as a result, depending on the degree of hardware differences. The next step then would be a repair install from your Win XP install CD.
     
  17. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    Yeah good points crofttk. The other thing of course is the license allows for exceptional circumstances to be discussed :

    ".....without the written consent of Acronis".
     
  18. sigreene

    sigreene Guest

    Just a comment to the pros & cons in this thread.
    All software license agreements are basically scams dreamed up by conniving lawyers within a legal framework constructed by politicians who have been lobbied (paid off) by the software industry. The hundreds of millions of software users are not represented by a lobby; thus, the unchallenged development of the scam.

    However, these licenses are, as pointed out in this thread, a legal fact; therefore, it is still the moral responsibility of the user to meet the requirements of the license.

    Next time you lease a book, don't let anyone read it!
     
  19. adr58

    adr58 Registered Member

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    WOW! What alot of responses to a simple question.

    I already own Acronis TI-8. I use it on my Desktop. I have just resurrected a 5 year old laptop from the bottom of a drawer. It's only got a 10Gb hard-drive and a bunch of the Gb's are reserved for Compaq's restore software. As I have a multitude of software and user-specific settings, the thought of restoring back to the factory settings in the event of a fatal system crash scares the hell out of me. I am thinking of letting my wife use the laptop and I can see crashes being an every week thing! (sorry Sweetie!)

    Before I had Acronis, I used to spend over 10 hours solid rebuilding XP software from scratch every few months. I had a buggy HP desktop that now ironically (since removing some of the crap HP put on it) is very reliable. I've only ever used my PURCHASED TI6 thru 8 once to restore the beast. (and that was when I went away and Wifey used it !)

    As I only have a DVD-ROM on this old Win 98SE laptop and the removeable floppy disk drive only works 'sometimes', my question was to determine if a second license could utilize my desktop's DVD burner to create a recovery disk. No point buying a license and then not being able to create a recovery disk.

    I assume I can save a disk image to my desktop via the wireless card and burn CD's from the Desktop for the laptop o_O?
     
  20. tachyon42

    tachyon42 Registered Member

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    The merits or otherwise of software licenses in general are not exactly what this Support forum is about (my opinion) (and NO I am not a Moderator - just incase a troll wants to start another spurious issue).

    With regard to whether a boot CD could be used to restore to another machine in the event of the original machine failing - purchasing TrueImage gives you the right to install and use the features of that version of TrueImage on one machine (again my humble opinion). So I believe recreating a viable computer configuration is a certainly a valid use of a single user license.

    I believe Acronis has other kinds of licenses for situations such as computer dealers/installers who use TrueImage for multiple machines. I'm sure an email to Acronis Support detailing the specifics of any situation would get you the information needed to purchase the correct licenses.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9e/DoNotFeedTroll.jpg "Please do not feed the troll" images are meant to tell others not to encourage trolls by reacting to them. Please see the Wikipedia troll article for further information.
     
  21. gue_st

    gue_st Guest

    The main issue here is not if Acronis has other type of licenses, but - does the text of existing license agreement restricts usage of Boot CD on more than one computer (not at the same time).
    This is not a trivial issue, therefore comment from a lawyer would be useful.

    If Acronis wanted to restrict usage of Boot CD, they could really easy make it computer specific, or write a licence agreement to regulate boot CD usage, or specifically note that in the license agreement.
    In the unlikely case if they forgot to do that, it is not user's problem to guess what they might have wanted to say with the existing agreement.
     
  22. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    That's like saying if a car manufacturer does not build a car such that it can't be steered off the road, it not the users problem if they mow down a line of pedestrians waiting on the pavement for a bus. Are you for real or are you tro_lling.

    Once again I find you perpetuating absolutely pointless discussions in this forum with the debating skills of a 6th former. You either get the point about the license or you don't. My time is wasted on you.

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=51368
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=36508
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2005
  23. gue_st

    gue_st Guest

    Dear foghorne,
    Your passage about car makes me doubt if you understand what the license agreement is. There is no such thing as "point about license".
    If you are working for Acronis/are in love with Acronis, you may even go out to collect donations for them, who cares. Sorry for your time, though.

    Others would better pay ONLY what they are supposed to, according to License Agreement. And it is not really nice (worse than troling) if somebody, probably in the hope that daddy will give a pie, is playing some kind of software company's legal advisor.

    Thank you for the links, but there is nothing(except ridiculous statement that it is a copy of TI) about using boot CD without TI installed.
     
  24. foghorne

    foghorne Registered Member

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    Acronis - an answer please - was Re: Boot CD's computer specific??

    gue_st. Against my better judgement, I am replying here because I would really like for you to reach an answer which you find clear. Please rephrase my question if it is not quite right.

    Acronis, please respond to the following question:

    If I have a created a boot CD, but, no longer have the software installed anywhere (i.e. it only exists as one boot CD) is there any limit imposed by the license to the number of computers I can use to boot from this CD :
    a) Simultaneously
    b) One after another

    Thanks.
     
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