best virtualization to physical conversion process?

Discussion in 'sandboxing & virtualization' started by mikeo1313, Oct 30, 2007.

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  1. mikeo1313

    mikeo1313 Registered Member

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    When you virtualize you sacrifice total use of resources at the expense of the various flexibility benefits it may bring.

    When you multi-boot into a different os's your stuck in a single os at a time, but, as a home user, you harness all the memory & processing power best.

    I wonder if there's a virtualization software which can allow you to fully boot into an image on demand, {even while booted in an os and/or with a bootmenu}... I imagine there isn't... but damn I just thought about it for a moment and thought it would be great to have that flexibility. While I'm at it, this vm ought to have a backup module that allows you to even mount the images in boot menu or on demand... because if you think of it, you have probably have 3 softwares {isr's, backup, vm} that really would be best rolled into one... that would be cool!!!



    ***In the mean time, can anyone comment as to which is the best virtual machine {virtualbox, vmware, virtual pc} that has a very stable, reliable, smooth virtual to physical conversion process? ***

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2007
  2. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    In terms of the full featured versions, VMware is the cadillac, but also the most expensive. Great if you need/want it, but many use the others.

    I've never tried the virtual to physical conversion. I built the vm machine from scratch to match my physical machine. Keep them both current as if it was two computers.
     
  3. mikeo1313

    mikeo1313 Registered Member

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    Yup, vmware is the one it seems... after your post I did some searching...

    VMware has free software download for Vmware p2v conversion
    http://www.vmware.com/products/converter/


    Here are 6 ways to do the same:



    Heres a vmware guide for v2p conversion:
    http://www.vmware.com/support/v2p/index.html

    It simply involves being instrumental with the sysprep tool, if need be... & imaging software...


    lastly, I noticed shadowprotect , http://www.storagecraft.com/products/ShadowProtectIT/
    has p2v, v2v, v2p in whats considered to be "complimentary to VMWare™ and Microsoft™
    Virtual Server and PC for quick and reliable disaster recovery and system migration." as per their documentation. I assume that means you can do it all with shadowprotect in one step, pretty damn nift. Just about seems to be a far more superior program then Paragon's Drive Backup pro 8.51. Especially if the desktop version of shadowprotect can perform a remote restore over vpn.. awesome product! but that IT vesion is $3,500, :eek: ...
     
  4. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Obviously IT edition is not only for home users, nor a one or two person business. But for a big IT shop it's a bargain. Note that is $3500/year.
     
  5. grnxnm

    grnxnm Registered Member

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    Remote restore capability via VNC is supported by the ShadowProtect Desktop/Server Edition 3.x products' recovery environment. In the 2.x versions this feature was only available in IT Edition.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2007
  6. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    Xen or VMwares ESX server are close.

    These are 2nd level virtualisation, where the common vmware and virtual pc are 3rd level.

    2nd level is: virtualisation system (which is also an OS in its most basic form) -> guest os

    3rd level is : host OS -> virtualisation system -> guest OS

    The guest OS runs more effeciently than with virtualpc or vanilla vmware.
    The host OS is essentially a barebones system with a management console.
    Provides as much as a direct representation of the hardware as possible to the guest OS (eg you hdd shows are a ibm or maxtor, not a generic virtual device) - it does not emulate hardware as with virtualpc/vmware, but provides an interface to there is minimal peformance hit (obviously there is some performance hit of running mutliple kernels).

    Downside is the host machine has to be dedicated to virtualisation.
     
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