Benefits of Partitions

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Franklin, Jul 3, 2008.

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  1. Franklin

    Franklin Registered Member

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    Below is a clip of hard disk read/write operations to recover data.

    As you can see the seeks go from the most outer to the most inner.

    With say a 20 gig C drive partition on a large hard drive for the system the data seeks should stay at the most outer edge thereby speeding things up even if fragmented.

    Is that correct?
    Read/Write Seeks Clip
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2008
  2. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    You could make a case for one partition also. On my Intel machine, I have a 640GB drive, with one partition. Only 24gb in use. I defrag it regularily so everything is at the outer edge of the disk. If I partition it and put the data in the 2nd partition, then the drive would be constantly going back and forth between them.
     
  3. Hairy Coo

    Hairy Coo Registered Member

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    The reading or writing of data on a computer's disk drive cause three delays which are seek time, rotational delay and transfer time, and their sum is access time.

    Rotational delay is a factor of the rotational speed,generally 7200rpm.

    As the read /write head of the disk has the least movement to make ,the larger outer portions of a disk have the highest transfer rates,whilst the smaller inner areas have the lowest.

    If the data access isnt sequential and is fragmented all over the disk, each fragment of the file requires an additional positioning step of the read/write head to the location where this piece is located, causing a deterioration of the seek time.

    An obvious way to prevent this, is to create as many patitions as necessary of the smallest feasible size,all as close as possible to the rim.

    This causes any fragmentation to be in a nearby area- lowest seek times and highest transfer rates.

    A partitioned drive which is defragged will generally perform better than one which isnt partitioned but also defragged .
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2008
  4. Threedog

    Threedog Registered Member

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    Hmmmm, interesting. I have been running 2 hard drives, each with only 1 partition. I might have to rethink this strategy.
     
  5. EASTER

    EASTER Registered Member

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    The benefits IMO of partitioning is the freedom to run more than a single system at a time and able to switch (by reboot) over to a different completely separate operating system provided of course your HD has ample space to accommadate them.

    The genuine old FD-ISR version was a Dream Come True when it entered the field, because it allowed a user not only 2 bootable partition constraints but incredibly 10! That was a treat in and of itself. But that aside, partitioning offers a user more mobility and freedom to navigate within their respective systems and enjoy the comfort of easy accessibility to the other while enjoying the one their in at the time.
     
  6. Longboard

    Longboard Registered Member

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    :eek: lol
    WHy not just make an empty partition to take some slack out: would speed proceedures up. (oops: dont you have a raid set-up )
    Agree.
    I run a 'single' partition (per OS ) not counting VMs too: back-ups and data on external USB drives: so big, so fast and sooo cheap now: this has been a great buy:
    http://www.netgear.com/Products/Storage/ReadyNASNVPlus.aspx
    http://www.netgear.com/Products/Storage/ReadyNASNVPlus/RND4425.aspx
    It still is..for all those reasons..:D
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2008
  7. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Hi Longboard

    The Raid 0 array doesn't prevent partitioning. I just haven't yet found the need. For anything I'd do with a 2nd partition, I just use the d: drive or one of the two external drives I have.

    Pete
     
  8. Longboard

    Longboard Registered Member

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    :shifty:
    Linux
    :D
    Just for fun: even in the VMWare works good.
    Dont be afraid. :D
     
  9. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Linuxo_O Isn't that some cartoon cat.:D :D :D :D

    Seriously Linux just doesn't offer me anything. As to playing with it, I'd have to have a reason, and I don't.
     
  10. Longboard

    Longboard Registered Member

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    I know trhis is drifting Ot a bit:
    You might be surprised :)

    With FireFox, FDISR -and the new release :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: -, Sandboxes, VMs, Terabyte/ShadowProtect, Sysinternals tools, external storage, high speed processors, HIPSs and a router, -phew- , my MS experience has topped out so to speak. I have been able to cherrypick some outstanding MS softs, just some fine tuning left.
    Everything works, no BSODs for years, no visible malware for years: all copacetic. Confidence for disaster recovery is good.

    Kudos to this forum for helping make it so :cool:

    Maybe review if Windows8 looks good.
    My ability to help others is -cough- somewhat limited, :blink: and everyone ignores my links to Terabyte lol.
    I like giving back what I can, but I have some other things to do than endlessly pursue the latest granular firewall, I bow to and follow others expertise.
    My MS 'time' is not over yet I still need MS ..but have escaped the cage a bit.

    SO: new horizons and eyepopping experiences have been are being undertaken.
    Even getting productive with it. :D

    Coog.
     
  11. Huupi

    Huupi Registered Member

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    See no reason that the partitioned drive do better,if both drives have data only at the outer edges then IMO they perform equal. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  12. axial

    axial Registered Member

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    Hairy Coo said earlier:

    Perhaps I'm missing the implied "grin", but if not, could you elaborate on how one can control where partitions are created in relation to the rim?
     
  13. Hairy Coo

    Hairy Coo Registered Member

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    Partition 1 is nearest to the edge,partition 2 is next nearest etc.

    By compartmentalising/partitioning to the smallest possible size within reason of course,you make certain that fragments are kept within the partition,not spread all over the disk,which causes the R/W arm to oscillate all over the place,causing a deterioration in the Read/Write speeds and access times.
     
  14. MrBrian

    MrBrian Registered Member

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    The UltimateDefrag help file mentions this issue. They recommend fewer rather than more partitions, and using defragmenting to move frequently used files to the outer tracks, and less frequently used files to the inner tracks.
     
  15. chrisretusn

    chrisretusn Registered Member

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    That is what hard drives are designed to do. In normal everyday use I think it matters not whether the data is on the outer edge or not.

    I partition my hard drives for function not speed. On my XP box I have a system partition, a data partition and a archive partition (oops, that is another hard drive). With this setup I can wipe, restore my system partition without affecting my data or backups. My data partition has My Documents, Shared Documents plus all other data I want to save such as downloaded files and stuff. My archive is for daily backups and image saves.

    I have never benchmarked my hard drives I just don't see the point. I am happy with the speed of my system and not too concerned about tweaking it down to the nanosecond
     
  16. MrBrian

    MrBrian Registered Member

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    According to the UltimageDefrag help file:
    You can see that this is true by running a hard disk exerciser. I've done so in the past, and the difference in speed between outer and inner tracks is easily noticed. However, like you, I will continue to use multiple partitions for functionality reasons.
     
  17. CircleGirl

    CircleGirl Registered Member

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    What is a "hard disk exerciser"? Could be I know it by a different name??
     
  18. MrBrian

    MrBrian Registered Member

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    Sorry for being vague there. I meant the hard disk diagnostics program supplied by your hard drive manufacturer.
     
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