Backups without installing software

Discussion in 'backup, imaging & disk mgmt' started by packetdropped, Jan 26, 2012.

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  1. packetdropped

    packetdropped Registered Member

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    Hi,

    I'm looking for recommendations on backup software to image workstations where I don't have to install software. I'd like to boot up from a cd/dvd/thumb drive and image to an external drive or network storage. Extra credit for ease of use and the ability to move to new hardware. Economically priced is good too.


    Thanks, PD
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
  2. sm1

    sm1 Registered Member

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    You can try clonezilla though its gui is not intuitive. I use clonezilla that is bundled with parted magic:)
     
  3. napoleon1815

    napoleon1815 Registered Member

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    My offline image software tool is Image for Linux (http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/image-for-linux.htm) or any of the Terabyte imagine line (Image for Windows/DOS). Image for Linux support NTFS as well as other file systems, now has a GUI if you prefer, and is fast, stable, and cheap (price). It's more "technical" than most, so if you are looking for a fancier GUI with more automated (read: less control) tasks like dissimilar hardware restores, look elsewhere. This will do all that, and is heavily customizable. Good luck! I am sure you will get a lot of replies - and opinions - on this thread so let us know what you end up with! A few other recommendations:

    1. ShadowProtect - a Gold Standard for imaging but pricey
    2. DriveSnapshot - use an existing or custom WinPE CD to launch this one offline
     
  4. napoleon1815

    napoleon1815 Registered Member

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    I should add...for restoring to different hardware, the best experiences I have had have been with Paragon Hard Disk Manager. I admit I haven't done it much but using that tool never failed me. As an imaging tool it's good too, but a little slow compared to the others.
     
  5. andyman35

    andyman35 Registered Member

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  6. Spiral123

    Spiral123 Registered Member

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  7. MrBrian

    MrBrian Registered Member

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    Paragon Backup and Recovery Free can image from its rescue disc.

    Macrium Reflect Free can image from its WinPE (but not Linux-based) rescue disc.
     
  8. Debby747

    Debby747 Registered Member

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    Drive Snapshot (http://www.drivesnapshot.de/en/index.htm)

    + portable
    + only 284 kB executable
    + images may be opened as virtual drives to extract individual folders/files
    + fast, good compression (~50 %)
    + partitions may be set active at image restoration
    + restores to partitions different in size to image (grow/shrink)
    + restores to different hardware (might not be easy to configure? have not tested it myself...)
    + very easy to use
    + VSS compatible

    ° complete and differential back-ups only (no incremental backups)
    ° commercial product (39 €)
    ° Windows software
    ° GUI looks dated but clear and intuitive

    - partition based images (neither complete drives nor individual folders/files)


    This is just from the top of my head.
    Highly recommended. (Have a forum search for more user reports. There has been a comparison recently.) I think it might fit your needs.

    I boot into a WinPE system to make/restore "snapshots" (although it is "hot" as reliable from my experience).
    But Drive Snapshot itself does only offer a DOS BOOT floppy, I think. You have to provide your own boot environment (e.g. http://reboot.pro/11852/ if you own Windows 7).

    Greetings
    D.
     
  9. HAN

    HAN Registered Member

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    I used to use Image for DOS (highly reliable!) but got tired of having to keep up with all the changes they kept making to it. (Plus, the DOS interface was never handy anyway.) I wanted something fairly fast and easy to use. Price was not the biggest consideration.

    For the last couple of years I used ShadowProtect Desktop. If viewed for imaging purposes only, IMO, it's the one to use. Great GUI, solid as a rock and fast. Shortest imaging times I ever had. http://www.storagecraft.com/shadow_protect_desktop.php

    That said, I recently switched to Active@ Boot Disk for imaging. Mainly because I found it to be somewhat close to SP in speed, GUI and features and had several other tools along with the imaging. http://www.ntfs.com/boot-disk-win.htm

    BTW, both of these products boot from a Windows PE environment. Which for me, meant easy and familiar navigation and use.
     
  10. oliverjia

    oliverjia Registered Member

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    I recommend image for linux. Fast, now easy to use with a GUI and never failed me in 3 years. Best part is, for some reason, many other imaging tools using winpe 3 failed to boot into the program on my computer but image for linux never had a problem. which appears to me to be the most hardware compatible.
     
  11. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    And IFL contains TBOSDT Pro which assists in restoring images to different hardware.
     
  12. samy

    samy Registered Member

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    Hi Brian

    You are in this forum the "specialist" in IFL/IFD.
    To your opinion is TBOSDT a friendly program? for someone who has no knowledge in programing.

    Thanks
     
  13. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Samy,

    TBOSDT Pro is free if you own any of the TeraByte imaging apps or BIBM. It is not easy to use and there is a big learning curve. However the component that is used to install drivers into a non booting system, after performing a restore to different hardware, is easy to use. The OSDTool.

    Here is a video of the OSDTool in action. You only need to watch the final third of the video.

    http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/videos/ifl/osdtool-sample.wmv

    In most cases where I've used the OSDTool I haven't had to provide custom drivers. I've just chosen "Native" drivers and the new OS has booted. Once you are in Windows you may have to provide hardware drivers that aren't in the OS. eg Sound and Video card drivers. But that is the easy part.

    The video shows the OSDTool running from IFL but there are several other ways to run the tool. The tool can be used to install storage controller drivers after a restore with any brand of imaging app. It's not specifically for TeraByte apps.
     
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