Backup Registry settings?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by ppis, Aug 27, 2008.

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  1. ppis

    ppis Registered Member

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    Hello,


    I have Windows Installed on C:\, as well as other applications in C:\Program Files.

    All my data is on D:\ and I use SyncBackSE software to backup my data, so I do NOT need Acronis True Image to backup my data.


    In the event of a crash, I want to have an image of my C:\ disk to be able to restore my C:\ drive, with Windows as well as all installed applications, and to make an empty D:\ partition.

    I understand that this is the purpose of Acronis True Image.

    What is the simpler way to achieve this?

    After the restore, will I get exactly the same state of Windows and programs as before the crash? Does Acronis True Image also backup all registry settings of all applications? Is it a "true" disk image?
     
  2. TheWeaz

    TheWeaz Registered Member

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    Assuming you do a disk/partition image and not fiddle with Files and Folders -

    "After the restore, will I get exactly the same state of Windows and programs as before the crash?"
    The Windows state will be that of the time the backup was done.

    "Does Acronis True Image also backup all registry settings of all applications?"
    Yes.

    "Is it a "true" disk image?"
    Yes, to a degree. TI leaves out sectors that were not in use at the time of the backup.
     
  3. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    As was mentioned by TheWeaz only the in-use sectors are archived. Also, when the restore is done the sectors do not necessarily end up in the same location as they were when backed up. So the sector that was in location ABCD may be restored to location WXYZ. TI adjusts the file system to take care of this.
     
  4. jonyjoe81

    jonyjoe81 Registered Member

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    That's the best way to use true image, to backup and restore your c: system drive. If your original c: drive crashes, just restore an image backup of your c: drive onto a new hard drive.

    The new hard drive will bootup and run like the old drive, all your important documents/passwords/programs/registry/wallpaper/itunes/e-mail etc will work as before.

    You can also save a backup image of your c:drive onto a different partition, and if the original gets a virus/malware, just do a restore. It's works better than windows "system restore" which has very limited capability's.
     
  5. ppis

    ppis Registered Member

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    Interesting idea. Unfortunately in my case, there is not enough space on my partitions. The only way that works for me is to make backups onto an external disk.


    I have 2 partitions:
    C:\ (20Gb) the system partition where Windows is installed
    D:\ (30Gb) where I have all my data

    I use SyncBackSE to make a backup of D:\. For me SyncBackSE works out better than True Image, because it makes a Sync, not just a backup.
    I do not want to include D:\ in True Image backup, because it is a waste of space (Backing up twice the same 30Gb of data).

    So my idea is to use True Image to back up C:\ only. I want a restore that restores C:\ completely and creates a blank D:\ partition (no data in it)) of 30Gb.

    BUT
    So it sounds as if I should use Acronis True Image to backup D:\ as well, otherwise I will be in trouble when doing a restore after a disk crash.

    So which way should I go? Is the only "safe" way to make a backup of C:\ and D:\ with True Image PLUS make a backup of D:\ with SyncBackSE? (but is a total waste of disk space).
     
  6. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    Like you I have my data on a separate partition from Windows, and use a sync programme to back up data to an external rather than use ATI. (Have a look at M$ Synctoy beta btw, it's certainly seduced me away from SyncBack).

    I only use ATI to backup my system partition and restores work just fine.

    If you had to restore to a new drive that would work, but you would also need a partitioning tool either to shrink the system partition and create a data partition, or to partition the drive before restoring your system. Vista can do this unaided, but there are many other options. Acronis Disk Director is one, but you could simply use the free GParted for this task.
     
  7. ppis

    ppis Registered Member

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    Thanks for sharing your experience. I will do like you (make an image of C:\ only).


    I personnaly use SyncBackSE, mainly for syncing data across computers, and never had a problem.

    I just installed and tried SyncToy. It is a much more basic software: it does not support envrionment variables such as %Windows%, it is not possible to select which subfolders shoudl be part of the sync and which ones should be excluded, it basically syncs everything. The management of profiles (folder pairs in SyncToy) is much better in SynBackSE, and the profile results (which files to delete, to overwrite) are much better presented in SyncBackSE. Also SyncToy takes terribly more time to complete a run than SyncBackSE.

    SyncToy does not seems as useful for me as SyncBackSE.

    I wonder what made you leave SyncBack. Were you using the paying version (SE) versus the freeware version?
    Is it just a question of free (SyncToy) vs paying (SyncBackSE) or more of a feature issue?
    Or did you have a bad experience with SyncBackSE such as file loss?
     
  8. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    I use Synback to backup data on a separate partition and TI to make an image of my C drive. I tried MS Synctoy and had problems with it and went to free Syncback. I have since upgraded to the paid version and consider it far superior to SyncToy. I have versioning enabled because this is a weakness in just syncing files. If you somehow create a bad file it will replace the good one in your backup and now you don't have a good one anymore.

    If I need to restore because of a total disk failure which hasn't happened or because of a new disk installation, I take a longer route because it always works and it also gives me a chance verify the new disk. Also, since the new disk is inevitably larger it allows me to setup different partition sizes easily.

    I boot up the XP install disk and use its disk setup stuff at the beginning of the install to partition and do a Full format which does a read-check of all the sectors. The quick just writes the file system structure. I then cancel out of the setup. I then restore my C drive to the appropriate partition and let TI expand it if the new one is larger. I then copy my data back to the other partitions. You can use XP's disk management to change the drive letters of the data partitions if necessary.

    So yes, it takes longer than just doing a whole disk restore but it always works, lets me verify the disk surface, and lets me easily fiddle with partitions. Sometimes the hard way is indeed the easy way. This is also done so infrequently that a few minutes more is totally meaningless.
     
  9. ppis

    ppis Registered Member

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    Thanks for your feedback. This sounds like a reasonable way to do a backup / restore (TI for C:\ and SyncBackSE for data on D:\).

    So, according to you, partitions can be done directly from the XP install disk? This is good news, as I was looking into GParted, and it is not so obvious how to use it (more of a Linux world than an XP world).

    I will use the same strategy as you. However, there is one thing that I do not understand. The Acronis Simple Restore Guide shows a window of the data restore wizard. The window is just 2 steps in the wizard before launching the restore. It says: "Non Empty Destination Disk Drive". "The harddisk you have chosen to restore from the harddisk backup archive contains some partitions".

    It then basically says that you have to select "Yes, I want to delete all the partitions on the destination harddisk before restoring" for the restore process to start. Selecting the other option "No, I do not want to delete the partitions" stops the restore process.

    How can you do this without having to select "Yes, I want to delete all the partitions on the destination harddisk before restoring"?
     
  10. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    I don't think this is the place for an in-depth discussion of SyncToy v. SyncBack, but you have dismissed SyncToy before properly understanding it. Take the subfolder selection issue for example -
     

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  11. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    I use the standard MS XP CD. If you have one of those tailored recovery disks the option might not be available.

    Is this a case of restoring a whole disk image or even cloning a whole drive that your comment refers to? I only select the C drive image for restoration and further into the wizard it asks which partition to restore. Before doing the restore TI does indeed the partition but in the single image case it is only the one it is restoring to. I don't use TI11 but I assume this type of operation is still the same.
     
  12. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    ppis,
    First, thank you for reading my guides and/or some of my postings. As you know, there are many different methods possible when working with computers. For you, the meaning of "difficult and cumbersome" means performing your own partitioning and formatting steps as described by Earthling & Seek Forever. It's good that you have those capabilities. Many others have not taken the time to learn any alternate methods so restoring from the full disk backup archive is easier for them as it might also be for you. The methods is a matter of personal choice. The important part is having the tools & the data necessary to recover.

    The reason a "disk" image backup is so valuable is that you can very easily create a new disk replacement but have the added benefits of performing a single partition restore if that is all that is needed--such as when a virus occurs.

    Just because I advocate performing a full backup of the entire disk first & occasionally, this should not be interpreted that every backup has to include all partitions. My concern is that of a disk failure and your quick ability to recover. A disk backup provides that capability very easily. You can still do single partition backups but always maintain a full disk backup which is reasonably current. My system drive has 3 partitions. I do a full backup once a week and do incremental daily or every 2 days so I am always reasonably current without any extra effort. There can be many variations of a backup strategy as long as you have all bases covered. I, too, have my personal data copied to other disks by programs such as Replicator but these are supplementary only and not part of my primary recovery procedures

    The most important part of your procedure is for you to test your recovery procedures where you perform an actual full recovery to a test disk. Perform all the procedures necessary to get you booted in a new blank replacement disk and to make sure they work for you as planned. The TrueImage Home does provide the capability (Add new Disk) to create partitions & format partitions to blank new disks from both within Windows and when using the TI Rescue CD if that is your restore method of choice. It is very easy to become confused about drive letters when using the Rescue CD because they may differ--especially if you have multiple drives. Just be careful that you create unique names for each of your new volumes and that you positively identify the disk or partitions sizes involved.

    My guides are not meant to be the "only" way but they do serve, in my opinion, to overview several important points.
    1. When performing a backup, best results are obtained when the drive being imaged is installed in its original boot position.
    2. When a new blank drive is being cloned or restored:, the old original drive should be removed and the target drive installed in its place prior to any cloning or restoring.
    3.
    a. if cloning: it is best that the original drive be relocated to another internal/external/network location prior to the intended cloning procedure.
    b. if restoring: backup archive stored on another internal or external or network drive.
    4. Cloning or Restoring procedures should be performed when booted from the TI Rescue CD or alternate TI Bootable Removable device.
    5. Partition Restore with resize is my preferred method of moving to a new larger disk. Preferred because it is the safer method and there is no risk to the master (not attached) should a mistake or malfunction occur.​
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2008
  13. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    Excellent post GroverH!

    Quite often replies on the best way to do something or even a workaround are colored by the expertise and equipment available to the person writing the post. I wouldn't want to tell my wife to "just make a BartPE CD"! :D
     
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