Backup Locations

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by spotty, Sep 4, 2008.

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  1. spotty

    spotty Registered Member

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    Is it possible to make a backup to two locations at one time?

    I know you can "copy" a backup file to another location---but---if one backs up to the acronis security zone---how does one copy from there to say---an external drive?

    Does the security zone show anywhwere so one can go in and copy?

    thx
     
  2. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    The Secure Zone is designed to be inaccessible and there is no way to copy archives in or out of it. You have to use TI to manage the zone and are restricted to what it permits.

    Of course, if you are a partition genius you might be able to find some fancy trickery to reveal the partition and do things but for regular users it is unavailable for typical commands.
     
  3. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    While the SZ prvides some added security by making access more difficult for the casual user, it also makes management more difficult. A good securoty measures provides for locking and unlocking -- the SZ pretty much jsut does the former -- it's not a high quality locks for these dkinds of purposes. What it's good for is allowing backups fro someone that has only one hdisk. But htese days, getting a second hdisk is a much better solution.

    Skip using the SZ and keep your files in a truly safe place, on another disk and keep the disk away from the PC. IF the data isn't worth that, then skip the SZ and don't worry about it, jsut store to a regular backup location.
     
  4. spotty

    spotty Registered Member

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    The advice to not use the SZ is what I will do.

    I cannot understand why this type software is so non-user friendly.

    One cannot image to two locations simultaneously; one cannot reboot to stay in try and decide.

    These are the main two reasons I bought this software. Guess I should have asked the questions first before I bought.

    I will be looking for an easier more user freindly option---thx for your advice.
     
  5. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    One reason it isn't real user friendly is that to understand what is going on requires a knowledge of disks and partitions. Many users these days give you a blank look when you tell them they can check some file detail with Windows Explorer.

    Most of us buy a product like TI because it will make an image backup of our partitions at compartively lightning speed. And for many of us that is all we really want the product to do, we don't give a rat's butt about email backup, application settings backup, Try and Decide, even Files and Folders backups aren't really wanted. In fact, we see most "new features" like these as nothing more than fluff added by the marketing department rather than giving any real improvement in functionality. After all, if you've got a fast image of your disk you have everything you need to restore anything.

    We likely wouldn't see any advantage in writing the backup to 2 locations at once. Just write it as fast as the system permits and copy it to the second location if you really think you have to.

    I don't use Try and Decide so I don't know anything about your problem with it. I do use TI to trial software frequently, I make an image of my C drive, install the software, try it and then restore the image.
     
  6. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    As far as Try and Decide goes, a far better solution is to install a virtual machine. I use VirtualBox in Vista, it's free, and it's quite superb - as long as you have a decent spec PC.
     
  7. spotty

    spotty Registered Member

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    Earthling:

    is there a version for windows?


    Seekforever:

    point well taken---I originally bought the TI for that very reason and I guess the other stuff is fluff. But--on copying and image after it is made---I do not think there is a way to copy it to the ASZ from an external source in case you for some reason want an external copt if ASZ does not work.


    thx
     
  8. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    spotty:

    VirtualBox will install in XP or in Vista. It virtualises a complete PC system, and, just like you do on a PC, you then install an operating sytem within it, the 'guest' system. The guest system behaves exactly the same as it would as if installed in a real machine, and makes a perfect software testbed. The guest system can be Windows, Linux, Solaris or others, and you can install as many guest systems as you want.

    It really is pretty amazing, even more so as Sun don't charge for it.
     
  9. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    I know we are off-topic but any idea regarding the horse-power of a machine to run it in a "reasonable" fashion?

    Thanks
     
  10. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    Seekforever:

    It doesn't have to be F1 standard. I'm running it in a 50GB Vista partition with 2GB DDR2 PC4200 and Core2Duo E6300. I've installed XP in it, and XP runs just as it does in my XP dual boot on the same comp.

    Depending on what resources you allocate to the VM then the host system will have that much less, so there is a balancing act if your system is strapped at all.
     
  11. spotty

    spotty Registered Member

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    earthling:

    do you need to buy another windows xp disc to install it in the virtual or will my current xp disc work?

    where can I download the software?

    peace
     
  12. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    You can use any retail Windows installation disk but just as in any installation you will need to activate it.

    Download @ http://www.virtualbox.org/
     
  13. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    While we're off-topic, I'm very impressed with Microsoft's free Virtual PC 2007. I have installed it on my Vista machine and have installed Windows XP in a Virtual Machine as the guest OS. Honestly, I cannot tell the difference between XP operating natively on the PC and XP running in a VM. And this is on 3-yr old hardware with unspectacular specs.

    Earthling is correct - a VM makes a wonderful test bed. I have installed TI and DD to the VM and use it to test solutions before answering forum posts. If in doubt, create a disk layout like the original poster has, then test away. When done, delete the Virtual Disk drive and replace it with the original copy. Credit goes to MudCrab for getting me started with Virtual PC. That's how he is able to test so many different configurations for people.
     
  14. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    I would have used MS Virtual PC myself but it won't install in Vista Home Premium. I'd never heard of VirtualBox until I appealed elsewhere for an alternative VM. As k0lo says, you really can't tell the difference from a normal installation.
     
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