Allstate Patent Car Anti-Privacy Technology

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by driekus, Sep 14, 2015.

  1. driekus

    driekus Registered Member

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    http://www.thestate.com/news/business/article32774505.html

    Thought this was interesting.

    I tried finding the patent but none of the articles reference the original patent. If anybody can find it I would be really greatful. Obviously the privacy concerns are very concerning, particularly if this technology becomes widespread and insurers make insurance prohibitively expensive to those who disagree to the invasion of privacy.
     
  2. Keatah

    Keatah Registered Member

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    Then I'll either spoof the data or not participate.
     
  3. stapp

    stapp Global Moderator

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  4. driekus

    driekus Registered Member

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    None of the patents on Traffic based driving analysis but you got close.

    It is Motor vehicle operating data collection and analysis.

    I have been saying for quite a while to people I know that this is where it is headed but this is solid evidence that this is where the whole data broker system is headed.

    All I can say is that one advantage of these systems is that if you know how to play the game you can use it to your advantage. Knowing how the credit agency game is played has enabled me to manipulate my credit rating. I already mask purchases that I dont want companies knowing about and use cards for the ones that I want them to know about so this will be an extension of this.
     
  5. wshrugged

    wshrugged Registered Member

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  6. stapp

    stapp Global Moderator

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    At least I got the right list!!

    In the Motor vehicle operating data collection and analysis if you read right down to the bottom (you may need several cups of coffee) there doesn't seem to be much info that it doesn't collect.
     
  7. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    In many places you are required to have/purchase insurance for your vehicle. In many places, few can afford to self-insure. For huge numbers of people, a personal vehicle is not a luxury they can do without. Virtually every trip in a car could/would reveal one or more things that an insurance company, and its subcontractors, business partners, etc don't have a legitimate need to know. So selectively NOT using the vehicle wouldn't be sufficient or generally practical. Neither would trying to generate "beneficial" data points, because all you'd be doing is adding some "noise" to the real datapoints that are collected and can be discerned with sophisticated systems (including well trained AI).

    These types of systems can be designed and built into vehicles in ways that would make it almost impossible to disable, and pretty much impossible to disable without being detected. Some, if not all, of the companies that want to engage in automotive data collection (insurance companies, car manufacturers, etc) are surely pressuring governments to implement regulations that require their use and establish penalties for tampering. Government agencies have their own motivations too. So, eventually, you... and everyone you care about... would have to refrain from buying any newer vehicles. Plus, hope that there are no retroactive installation requirements and/or expensive exception fees.

    Existing sensors... license plate readers on police vehicles & tow trucks, security & traffic cameras with image recognition, smartphones/apps, etc ... can be leveraged for some of these purposes. Vehicles that you must share the road with can also be made to participate in the data collection and reporting. So even if you could find a way to avoid owning/operating such a vehicle and could afford to do so, you'd still be vulnerable.

    I think we all believe in and practice a) various "defensive" steps aimed at avoiding/minimizing/shaping our exposures. However, without b) consumers working to create financial penalties for companies & individuals engaged in privacy reducing practices, and c) citizens fighting against legislation and government actors doing so, then we all lose.
     
  8. prius04

    prius04 Registered Member

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    In the U.S., almost every state requires vehicle owners to purchase auto insurance or post a cash bond, yet tens of millions manage to get away without doing either (which costs everyone else several billion dollars annually). One would think insurance companies would deal with that issue rather than developing ways to invade the privacy of financially responsible motorists, but then I suppose the latter fills the corporate coffers while they can simply pass along the costs of uninsured motorists on to those who comply with the law and purchase insurance. It's really beyond pathetic.
     
  9. driekus

    driekus Registered Member

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    Definitely appreciated you getting the right list :)
     
  10. driekus

    driekus Registered Member

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    I disagree with generating beneficial data points as being pointless. What is unclear at this point is how you could do it, given time with privacy advocates like us we will figure out how to deal with it. I dont think AI is that good and wont be that good.

    My example of credit ratings is a good example. I raised it 200 points by manipulating the average time my accounts were open and by changing credit utilization.

    Another example is dealing with Windows 10. We already have good solutions to the privacy risks imposed by the operating system.
     
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