Acronis Startup Recovery Manager not bootable under BootItNG?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Baduk, May 13, 2009.

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  1. Baduk

    Baduk Registered Member

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    I can't get Acronis Startup Recovery Manager to boot under BootItNG. Acronis support told me they don't have a solution. Still I think this is rather weird. Is it true that there isn't any workaround?

    I know I can circumvent BootItNG by using an Acronis Rescue Media CD, but why should I, when it isn't really necessary?

    I'm using Acronis True Image Echo Workstation (build 8.206) and BootItNG 1.86a.
     
  2. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    I assume BING was setup and activated and then you activated the ASRM.

    Exactly what happens? Does the computer still boot directly to BING and you don't get the F11 ASRM prompt? Does the F11 prompt show, but then you don't get your BING menu?

    Have you tried setting up a boot menu entry to boot the SZ partition. If that works you might not need the F11 prompt. I haven't tried this so I don't know if it would work or not.
     
  3. Baduk

    Baduk Registered Member

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    It's some time ago now, that I installed ASRM.

    Anyway, I had BootItNG installed already and installed ASRM afterwards. I think ASRM deactivated the BootItNG boot menu, but I reactivated it with a BootItNG CD. Then I tried to boot from the Acronis Secure Zone partition, both directly and by creating a boot item. In both cases I got an error message telling me that the Acronis Secure Zone partition isn't bootable (edit: "non-system disk").

    Edit 18th May 2009: No one?
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2009
  4. Baduk

    Baduk Registered Member

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    Just a reminder: doesn't anybody know if and how this could work?
     
  5. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Baduk:

    I'm not familiar with how BING works so I'm stabbing in the dark here. Is your ASZ on a primary or on a logical partition? If logical, how does BING handle booting to logical partitions? With most boot managers you have to adjust the "Hidden Sectors" parameter in the logical partition's boot record before it will boot directly (i.e. change "Hidden Sectors" from the default value of 63 to the absolute sector number at the start of the partition).
     
  6. Baduk

    Baduk Registered Member

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    k0lo:

    The ASZ is the last Volume on an extended partition. It's on the third of four partitions.

    The type is BCh/188, which I can't find anything about. BING complains that the last volume of the partition should be FAT/FAT32. Also there is empty space before the ASZ volume. I think ATI placed the ASZ at the end of free space on the extended partition itself.

    The volume doesn't seem to be hidden and BING says it's bootable (apart from the above complaint).

    It doesn't help setting the ASZ active.
     
  7. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Baduk:

    Type 0BCh is an Acronis Secure Zone. In reality the partition is formatted as FAT32, but the 0BCh type will keep it hidden from Windows. You could try, as a test, changing the partition type to 0Ch (FAT32 LBA) to see if it makes any difference to BING:



    DD10-1.PNG DD10-2.PNG

    Active only has meaning for primary partitions. If you have a disk editor then try setting Hidden Sectors as described in post # 5.

    Depending on your needs there are alternative approaches. If you only want the function provided by the ASRM (being able to boot into the recovery version of ATI) and don't need the ASZ as a place to store images then you could try a workaround. Build a bootable USB flash drive with all of your ATI software installed. Test it. Dedicate a separate partition for holding these files, which should only occupy ~30 MB. Then use ATI to create an image of the flash drive. Restore the image to the new partition. Set BING up to boot into the partition.
     
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