Acronis Migrate Easy

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by asimof, Nov 1, 2008.

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  1. asimof

    asimof Registered Member

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    Hi,
    I use Acronis True Image, which i presume would clone a HDD to enable me to put everything onto a new HDD. So why would i need Migrate easy when it does the same thing.
    Thankso_O o_O
     
  2. bodgy

    bodgy Registered Member

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    If you have TI 2009 or V11 then Migrate Easy has now been renamed and combined into the imaging program.

    So the stand alone program is not required, and as it's the same program, that's why it does the same thing.

    I don't think the Website/Marketing people have quite caught up with the technical programming side as yet.

    Colin
     
  3. asimof

    asimof Registered Member

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    Thanks for that info.
     
  4. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello All ,

    Thank you for your interesting in Acronis True Image

    Both Acronis True Image Home 2009 and Acronis Migrate Easy 7.0 can clone hard drives, the procedure is the same. Though there is a little difference, first is in price, Acronis True Image Home 2009 costs $49.99 and Acronis Migrate Easy 7.0 $39.99. So if your aim is just clone hard drive then Acronis Migrate Easy 7.0 is your best choice. Second difference is in supported operating systems.

    Acronis True Image Home 2009 supports the following operating systems:

    - Windows Vista (including x64 Edition);
    - Windows 2000 Professional SP4;
    - Windows XP SP2;
    - Windows XP Professional x64 Edition.

    Acronis Migrate Easy 7.0 supports all versions of Windows since Windows 98 Second Edition and including Windows Vista.

    Acronis True Image Home 2009 doesn’t support Windows 98 and Windows Me.

    Best regards,
    --
    Dmitry Nikolaev
     
  5. Ed Every

    Ed Every Registered Member

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    Dmitry, while you indicate that ATI 2009 supports Windows 2000 Professional, the current data sheet does not. Perhaps there has been a change?


    Refer to the current datasheet:
    http://eqca.download.acronis.com/sl...HAmhEs/p/pdf/ATI_2009_Home_Datasheet_0209.pdf

    It indicates that just these operating systems are supported by Acronis True Image 2009:

    Supported Operating Systems
    • Windows Vista
    • Windows XP SP2
    • Windows XP Professional x64 Edition

    (Windows 2000 Professional isn't mentioned.)
     
  6. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello Ed Every,

    Thank you for your interesting in Acronis True Image

    Thanks Ed Every, according to the following article in public knowledge base Acronis True Image Home 2009 doesn’t support Windows 2000 Professional SP4.

    Best regards,
    --
    Dmitry Nikolaev
     
  7. Ed Every

    Ed Every Registered Member

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    Actually the article you referenced (http://www.acronis.com/support/kb/articles/453/index.html), does say this: "After installing any of the Acronis True Image product under the supported operating system you will be able to create/activate a standalone version of Acronis True Image product that doesn't require any operating system to be running. This will allow you to back up any unsupported operating system."

    I assume they are referring to the True Image Rescue CD. Can the rescue disk be prepared on one computer (having XP or Vista) and then used in a second computer to back up or transfer Windows 2000 to a new hard disk?
     
  8. bodgy

    bodgy Registered Member

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    The rescue CD uses Linux so is independant of Microsoft OS'.

    As W2K uses NTFS same as Xp etc, I don't see why this wouldn't work.

    The main thing to check would be that Linux can see all the drives and that all the drives have meaningful labels to make it easier to see what is what in the Linux environment - in fact - I did have a W2K partition on my PC and TI in Windows XP had no problem imaging that partition and my rescue CD (then version 9) had no problem seeing my partitions etc.


    Colin
     
  9. Ed Every

    Ed Every Registered Member

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    Let's assume that I have Vista on Computer A and W2K on Computer B. The two computers are also physically different (different configurations).

    My goal is to get a True Image Rescue CD created that will be able to restore W2K on computer B should the need arise.

    As I understand it, the only way I can generate a True Image Rescue CD would be on my Vista computer, Computer A. I suppose I could (physically) remove and install the W2K drive from Computer B in computer A and (under Vista) create an image of it there.

    But since in this case the drivers for computer A would be different than those for Computer B, I'm concerned as to whether that True Image Rescue CD that was generated in Computer A can be used in Computer B to restore the image (that we moved to Computer B) to a new hard disk. In other words perhaps the True Image Rescue CD will not work in Computer B since it would have Computer A drivers?

    Maybe a solution would be keeping the image in Computer A, using the True Image Rescue CD to restore the W2K image to a new hard disk that is temporarily installed in Computer A, then move that new disk to Computer B.
     
  10. bodgy

    bodgy Registered Member

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    The CD once made will work in any machine - assuming that the kernel understands the chipset of the other machine.

    It doesn't matter which machine you make the CD from - the CD made on my desktop machine (XP) will quite happily work on my laptop (Vista). As I said the only proviso is that the Linux kernel has the correct drivers for the chipset and drive method of the other machine.

    If you restore an image to a different machine, then you most likely will get a HAL error or a BSOD, the easiest way of solving this is to have an XP/Vista install media handy and perform a repair - this will sort the booting problem out.

    Colin
     
  11. Ed Every

    Ed Every Registered Member

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    I'm not a Linux guy but I understand that some new Linux versions can have some problems with older computers - (like the computers that are likely to be running Windows 2000).

    I tried a demo (free) version of Paragon's Drive Backup (called Drive Backup Express) on an old Windows 2000 machine and used it's bootable CD to create a drive image. It had delays of 9 seconds between mouse movement and screen reaction and the image (17.7GB) was created very, very slowly (134 hours for 17.7GB). Paragon's support said that this was due to a new version of Linux being used in the CD and the age of the PC.

    This might also be the reason that newer ATI versions (2009) may have problems with some of the machines old enough to be likely running Windows 2000.

    If that was the case some W2K machines would work well using these bootable Linux CDs and some might have problems.
     
  12. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello all,

    The CD which was created on one PC can be used on another, but please be aware that according to Acronis software licensing policy, you should purchase one copy of Acronis program per each machine it will be used with.

    Acronis True Image Home can restore the image from one computer to another only if both computers have absolutely identical hardware configuration. If hardware configuration of your computers is different, we recommend you to use Acronis True Image Echo Workstation with Acronis Universal Restore option With this option you will be able to restore one image to computers with dissimilar hardware.

    Thank you.
    --
    Alexander Nikolsky
     
  13. Ed Every

    Ed Every Registered Member

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    Looking at the data sheet, I notice that Acronis Iniversal Restore has drivers for SCSI and IDE. (No mention of SATA controllers.) Looks like you may have to locate your own SATA drivers?
     
  14. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello Ed Every,

    Thank you for your interest in Acronis Corporate Products

    Actually, Acronis Universal Restore doesn't have its own driver database. If you select the default value, AUR excludes the drivers from Windows database. Also, you can place the required drivers to a separate directory (to a diskette, a CD disk, etc.) and specify the selected path during the recovery.

    Thank you.

    --
    Oleg Lee
     
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