Acronis Image Saved to Desktop?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by rugmankc, Jan 11, 2008.

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  1. sparkymachine

    sparkymachine Registered Member

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    The other folders that have been 'restored' including the D within your documents can be deleted. Acronis has placed these things you describe in attempts two and three because it doesn't know where else to put them. I'm trying to answer quick because you need the info, i wish someone else would help too.

    I'm still on the case ok
     
  2. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    They can be deleted and, hopefully, Windows will allow them to be deleted.

    Trying to test a restore by restoring files & folders in this way is not good (especially when testing on "User" files or anything in a "System" folder). TI sometimes has problems when these types of files are restored from an image. You can also end up with files that absolutely refuse to be deleted.

    A much better test is to Mount or Explore the backup image and copy out the files & folders you want. Then paste them where you want them.
     
  3. sparkymachine

    sparkymachine Registered Member

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    It will be ok to delete anything that has been restored but nothing else. Vista folders seem to have a different layout than XP, which is annoyingly what I expect from microsoft.

    I suspect that your first attempt to restore have overwritten what you currently had in the Mozilla folder. The other backups you tried probably didn't affect it. Cancelling a backup will not roll back anything that already happened.
     
  4. sparkymachine

    sparkymachine Registered Member

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    I gave an example which did not include system files, obviously this did not come across.
    And on that one I don't agree Mud, it does not replicate or test doing a 'restore'.
     
  5. rwt325

    rwt325 Registered Member

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    In my opinion there is too much risk putting a C drive image on the same physical disk, even if in another partition. If your disk goes , so go all your images.

    The only safe way is to put your images on the second disk inside the box, if you have one, or on the external HD, or on the DVD.
     
  6. rugmankc

    rugmankc Registered Member

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    I do have my original Mozilla intact and I requested the three tests go to Ken/Documents. Upon further reading, I think the first two tests went correctly, just don't understand why it happened that way. Is mounting the preferred way of restoring individual files and folders? I guess if you were actually restoring something to it's original location you would have to think hard whether to use absolute paths or not. Guess I will stay away from that unless I get a lot better at this. Only confusing part is the D: restore. Can't figure out how that happened. And why my laptops C: drive went down the same amount of memory as contained in the D: folder in documents. Maybe it will come back when I delete those three folders. Don't really understand why the C and D folders were named that upon being restored to documents when it was only folders being restored. I read that Acronis may assign different drive letters to restored partitions when restoring full images. Haven't got that far yet. If my recovery partition was damaged it won't matter. I have recovery CD's and backups of programs/apps/files. Main reason I got Acronis was to image everything with the OS. May delete the recovery partition anyway after I get the external hd and image to it and save other data there. Should I put an SZ on the ext drive or just image my computer to it. Not sure how I want to implement that or which usb drive to get. Below is the help info I saw when I canceled the the third restore. Since my destination was documents, I'll hope the recovery partition on my laptop was not affected. It still shows on my laptops disk management, just don't know if I lost the info from it the contents showing in the D folder in documents. I doubt it. I'll post if any problems occur after deleting the three folders. Sorry for all the confusing posts.


    capture13.JPG

    Thanks,

    Ken
     
  7. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    My post was general in nature and not in any way referencing what your example was. Ken restored files & folders that were in Vista's "Users" folder into his "Documents" folder. This is what I was referring to. If you must restore this way, make a temporary folder (say c:\testrestore) and restore to that folder. Both the "Users" folder and the "Documents" folder are "System" folders as far as how Vista looks at them. Perhaps you have not read some of the threads dealing with the problems this can create. In some cases, it can be easier to just restore the partition image than try and fix it.

    Not sure I understand what you are referring to here. Maybe that Mounting or Exploring doesn't replicate a "Restore" test? If so, I agree. It is, however, in my opinion, the best way to get files & folders out of an image. It's also a lot safer since it's a regular copy & paste procedure.
     
  8. rugmankc

    rugmankc Registered Member

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    Follow-Up,

    I successfully deleted all three test folders. My laptop's C: drive memory returned to it's original value. All seems well.

    MudCrab,

    I like the idea of creating a test folder under C:. Sparky actually suggested that, but I didn't do it. If I actually restore files/folders, I'll do it through mounting as you suggested. I'll also post for advice before I do that or a full image restore if ever needed and before I start putting back-ups on an external drive. Will continue to study the Help Files. Acronis offers a lot of versatility if you know what you're doing.

    Anyone on a good external USB drive, 500GB, portable preferably. One that works well with a Sony Vaio with Vista and obviously Acronis.


    Thanks for all the help,

    Ken
     
  9. sparkymachine

    sparkymachine Registered Member

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    I tend not to read much to do with Vista but I wouldn't have thought my suggestion would have caused a problem. Surely Vista doesn't see folders and files in the Documents folder as system files - how stupid is that.

    Yes, your assumption is correct and I agree with what you say.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2008
  10. sparkymachine

    sparkymachine Registered Member

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    Hi Ken, glad you haven't ruined your system and may be we both learned something - certainly I will stay away from Vista probably more now than ever.

    When you don't use the original location during a restore then software will either restore everthying into the one location you specify or create the complete tree of folders in and under that location. So that is why you had a new D drive folder and so on.
     
  11. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    Just so it's clear, the problem TI has with restoring files & folders from an image is not limited to Vista. This problem also happens with XP. It has a lot to do with permissions and how Windows "locks" and "links" system folders.

    Mounting and Exploring is just an easy way to avoid this problem.

    And, to be fair, you could copy the files around in Windows and make a mess of things too.
     
  12. rugmankc

    rugmankc Registered Member

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    Sparky and MudCrab,

    Thanks again for all the help, everything seems fine.

    Sparky: You did recommend a separate folder. I didn't listen and am responsible for all I do on my computer. All your help is greatly appreciated. I like to fiddle with things and that is why I want Acronis. There is nothing on the laptop important that I don't have copies of.

    MudCrab: Again, thanks for all your advice. I am still learning and having fun doing it.


    Note: Still looking for advice on a previously mentioned external hard drive for my Vaio and Acronis. Any ideas?



    Ken
     
  13. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    All the external drives I currently use are built using standard drives and enclosures so I can't recommend any "Brand-name" external. I did it this way because I could get a five year warranty on the drive. Most "already built" units have much shorter warranty periods (or did when I built mine).
     
  14. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Not to push a particular brand, but the Seagate external USB drives (FreeAgent series) come with a 5-year warranty. I've had good luck with mine.
     
  15. rugmankc

    rugmankc Registered Member

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    Thanks Guys,

    KOlo,

    What laptop do you have? Wanting to find someone with Sony Vaio and Vista if it makes a difference. Want 500GB, portable (runs off laptop), and compatible with my laptop and Acronis. I can check with manufacturers of both when I get a good recommendation.


    Ken
     
  16. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Ken:

    Sorry; no Sony Vaio. I have a Lenovo X41T.

    I don't think that you'll have a problem with Vista and external USB drives; almost anything should work. The issue may be with the TI recovery environment, and it probably won't matter whose USB disk you use. Either the recovery environment will have the right USB chipset drivers for your laptop or it won't. The only way to find out is to make a recovery CD and boot your laptop with it. Check to see if you are able to see external USB devices while running the "full" version of TI. If so, you're good to go.
     
  17. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    If you want the USB drive to run off the laptop's power (no power cord to external drive), you may have to settle for smaller than 500GB. I don't think there are currently any that large that will run off USB power and, in some cases, USB ports on laptops supply even less power than desktops.
     
  18. rugmankc

    rugmankc Registered Member

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    Good point MudCrab on the power output. I will always run laptop from AC, if I have the drive connected. If that helps? The largest I saw was a 320GB Lacie. That should be more than enough for me, but you never know. Couldn't determine much about it in regards to Acronis. I think it is Vista compatible though. I may have to post a new thread on this, since my experimentation problems are resolved.

    Thanks,

    Ken
     
  19. rugmankc

    rugmankc Registered Member

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    Hi KOlo,

    Don't understand what you said about checking to see if TI sees my USB drive. Are you talking about TI's recovery environment. Do I have to boot from recovery cd before TI can see the ext usb as opposed to just bringing up TI on my computer and creating a backup loation. If so, does that mean that is the only way I can backup to an ext drive, through the boot cd. I did not boot from my recovery cd, just plugged in my thumbdrive. SanDisk Cruzer 4GB. Below are two snapshots. First is my computer seeing the drive. Second is trying to create a backup location through TI. TI doesn't show the USB drive to allow it to become a backup location. Is that what you meant, or like I asked above do I have to test it through the boot cd? If it doesn't work through the boot cd, then I can't backup to the thumbdrive through the boot cd or normal activation of TI. Is this the only way to check for compatibiltity, which would be after I purchase a USB drive. I can install and boot the recovery cd first if that is what you meant. I guess I am confused why I need to boot from recovery cd first.

    Ken

    capture3.JPG




    capture4.JPG
     
  20. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Ken:

    I was only referring to the recovery environment. While you can create a backup from the Windows version of the program, when it comes time to restore you will need to have the recovery version working. So that's why I was suggesting that you check it now.

    Boot your PC from the recovery CD and make sure that you can see your internal hard disk and external USB devices when running the "full" recovery version of True Image.

    I'll defer to others about the backup locations; that's a feature that I don't use.
     
  21. rugmankc

    rugmankc Registered Member

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    KOlo,

    1. I booted TI from the recovery cd and Acronis saw my thumbdrive. Why did it not see it when I ran TI from Windows. You should be able to restore from windows as long as you can boot from windows. Not sure what we just did. I guess we ascertained my laptop is OK with Acronis and USB devices.

    2. I researched Seagates and found the 500GB standard one and the Pro version. Says they work with Acronis and Vista. Mixed reviews. But seems to be what I want. The standard has no backup software the Pro version does. Pro version seems to have a lot of features I don't need. What will not having backup software mean to me when it comes to restoring my full image from the Seagate back to my laptop? If the USB drive doesn't have it can you download backup software for it. Do you have backup software with yours?

    Ken

    capture5.JPG


    capture10.JPG
     
  22. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    Ken:

    When you start a restore from Windows, your PC has to first shut down Windows and then boot into the recovery environment, so you just got a preview of the recovery environment. You saw your USB flash drive. Were you also able to see your hard disk? If so, both of these are good signs.

    If I'm not mistaken, the backup software furnished with certain Seagate drives is a version of True Image. Since you already have True Image then this should not be a factor in your decision. The other features of the Pro version are eSATA and FireWire interfaces. Since you are going to use USB then you won't need the other interfaces. I would go with the standard version if it were me. Actually, that's the drive that I did purchase :). The cost was $120 last summer so they should be less expensive by now. Although reviews have been mixed, the reason is that some other brands are faster. However, I was more interested in reliability and the 5-year warranty meant more that a little more speed, and I've had a good reliability history with other Seagate drives.
     
  23. rugmankc

    rugmankc Registered Member

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    KOlo,

    I saw the the thumb drive and C: drive of the laptop and some other stuff. I assumed I was seeing the info on the bootable cd as far as the C: went. Was what I was looking at my actual laptop C: drive? It didn't appear to have the same hierarchy. I started to do some backup functions for test only, not going all the way through with them. I found it hard to figure out how to do it. Still have A LOT to learn.

    I think I'll pursue the same drive you have. What about the backup software for it? Can or do you image and restore your computer. That would be my main usage along with duplicating my thumb drive and windows backups I do monthly. I figure those could be drag and drop if that works between drives.

    I also checked on my Notebook Forum and several Sony/Vista people are using Acronis and Seagate and Western Digital drives. I hope I don't have to mess with downloading drivers.


    Ken


    Ken
     
  24. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    It probably was your laptop's actual C: drive. You should be able to tell by looking at the number reported for "size" of the drive.


    Acronis True Image is the backup software that I use and yes, I have used it with the external USB drive to image and restore my PC. The performance is not too shabby; it will back up to the external drive at a rate of 1 GB per minute, so it takes about 10 minutes to back up or to restore the entire C: partition. Your times will vary depending on how much "stuff" is on your drive. The 1 GB per minute figure refers to the size of the image file in Gigabytes.

    Good luck; it sounds like you're well on the way.
     
  25. rugmankc

    rugmankc Registered Member

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    Thanks KOlo,

    I understand now that TI is my backup software. I thought people were talking about additional backup software to put on the external drive. I'll get the Seagate 500GB one, standard version. Can't get a better testimonial than you using the same one. The rest is going to be trial and error and lots of questions. My oldest son is very much into the computer field (software engineer). I'll see if I can get him over when I first set up the drive and start backing up.

    I have already created a SZ on my internal laptop's hard drive. Can I create another one on the Seagate or just do a full backup and assign it it's own name and just leave it there until needed and create other folders for app and data backups?


    Ken
     
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