Acronis Bootable Rescue CD

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by ErikAlbert, May 9, 2006.

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  1. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    I'm using "Acronis True Image Home Trial version 9.0 (build 3.567)"
    I created an "Acronis Bootable Rescue CD" and I did an experiment.

    Situation :
    Harddisk1 - Local Disk [C:] = winXPproSP2 + Application + Data (bootable)
    Harddisk2 - Backup Partition [D:] = MyBackup.tib (not bootable)

    Experiment :
    1. I rebooted with my ZERO CD.
    2. I ran the full erase with zeros on Harddisk1 [C:] = 20 minutes (so my harddisk1 was completely EMPTY after that)
    3. I rebooted with my Acronis Bootable Rescue CD
    4. Recovered my Harddisk1 with "D:\MyBackup.tib" = 10 minutes including verification
    5. Restarted Windows
    6. Everything OK, otherwise I wouldn't be here.
    So this experiment was very successfull.
    --------------------------------------------------

    BUT there is something wrong IMO with the screens of the restore program on the Rescue CD :

    Mistake #1 :

    Disk Partition Recovery from Archive
    From file : "C:\MyBackup.tib"

    WRONG, it should be :

    Disk Partition Recovery from Archive
    From file : "D:\MyBackup.tib"


    Mistake #2 :

    Restoring Partition
    Drive letter : C: -> D:

    WRONG, it should be :

    Restoring Partition
    Drive letter : D: -> C:


    After all I'm restoring from "D:\MyBackup.tib" to partition [C:].
    This is VERY CONFUSING and I want to see very clearly FROM where TO where, when I do a restore (or a backup).
     
  2. TheQuest

    TheQuest Registered Member

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    Hi, ErikAlbert

    They are not mistakes because,
    So the first Partition Ti seeing was D:/ but now is C:/ because you deleted [000] the old C:/.

    So it cannot restore to C:/, because it is C:/.

    Take Care,
    TheQuest :cool:
     
  3. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    So you don't think that this is confusing for the average user ?

    During the restore I thought that TI was restoring winXPproSP2 on drive "D:"
    and that drive "C:" would still be empty.
    That's how it looks on the screen.
     
  4. TheQuest

    TheQuest Registered Member

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    Hi, ErikAlbert

    Yes it is easy to be confused at first, but once you understand how Ti works it is not So Confusing :cautious:.

    Ti can not overwrite Itself on a restore.

    Take Care,
    TheQuest :cool:
     
  5. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    ErikAlbert,

    When I restore an image backup, (*.tib) I just restore to the original partition. There is no need to delete the partition. TI takes care of this during the restore process. No confusion with C: drive letters although the data drive letters may be different from what you see in Windows. It helps to have meaningful labels for the partitions.

    How have you done restores in the past?
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2006
  6. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    I never had a backup system in the past. I just copied my personal files on CD with the poorest method : DirectCD (Roxio) :D
    Each time I was in serious trouble with my system, I re-installed from scratch.
    But those days are over.

    I don't have any troubles with Acronis True Image and the Acronis Bootable Rescue CD, except that the drive letters weren't correct on the screen.
    Both work fine until now and I've tested them in extreme situations, especially the RESTORE, which is often forgotten by users.
    This is all NEW to me, but I'm learning quickly and thanks for the explanation. :)
     
  7. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Assign unique drive letters before disaster strikes!

    Imperative with any backup program is your assigning of unique volume names to your hard drive partitions. This is a "must do". If you haven't already performed this necessary chore, do it NOW.

    When working from within Windows Normal Mode, drive letters are usually a non-issue. However, when working in a recovery mode such as from a Recovery CD; or Powerquest DriveImage 7 boot disk; or Acronis True Image User Boot Disk or Recovery Module, then it is imperative for you to positively identify the correct drive.

    Many backup programs get drive letter assignments confused and your only drive identification is the unique name previously assigned by you. Most likely, this is because Windows XP allows the user to assign their own drive letter without following any specific format. When the user boots into a recovery situation, then the drive letters cease to be "user assigned". Instead, the drive letters are assigned by the system based on its own pre-determined format. Thus, system assigned drive letters can become confusing. If you do not believe this possible, just look at my true life examples listed below.

    This situation occurs most frequently when booting into a system recovery or other maintenance situation. If you choose the wrong restore location, you can cause yourself lots of grief. Choose the restore location based on your unique names--not the drive letters assigned by the backup program.

    Go into drive properties and add your own unique volume names. Make sure the unique names you assign (8 character limit) are those which will positively identify the specific partition should the Windows disk naming convention get messed up. I recommend including the drive letter as part of your unique name. Seven personal illustrations pictured on my pdf linked below:

    http://206.128.27.80/name-drv/index.htm
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2006
  8. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    AFAIK disk labels should be 11 characters or less. This is the way it's been since the DOS days and I'm not aware of any change in the spec but I'm willing to learn.:D

    Apart from the issue of the Linux recovery envirnoment assigning different drive letters, I have given up trying to keep my PCs the same. I agree with using volume (partition) labels to keep things straight. With Window's mouse environment, you rarely even need to know what the letter is, but you do need to know you are in the right place!
     
  9. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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  10. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    Meanwhile I bought ATI and I sincerely hope I won't regret it after reading all the troubles with ATI at Wilders.
    The issue with the drive letters wasn't important enough for me and yes, I use good volume labels to identify the partition letters. I'm new, but not stupid.

    I wished ATI would mention my volume labels also instead of displaying such a poor info in the restore program of the Rescue CD and yes there was place enough to mention these volume label names.

    "Restoring Partition
    Drive letter : C: -> D:" :)
     
  11. Chutsman

    Chutsman Registered Member

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    I wholeheartedly agree with those recommending volume NAMES. I do this myself. For example if I have a Western Digital 160 gig drive which is partitioned in 3, I would use something like this for the volume names:

    1. WD160pt1
    2. WD160pt2
    3. WD160pt3

    This way there is absolutely no mistake which is which.
     
  12. Menorcaman

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

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    Nice link Brian. I'm not a Ghost user but found it an interesting and well reasoned thread :cool:.

    Regards
     
  13. aarond38

    aarond38 Registered Member

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    Great information & point well made! I am using Windows XP PRO & when I go into "my computer/view/details" I cannot locate the screen shown (pdf)
    "System Drive Properties" to change the disk volume names. Would someone please describe how I can locate this area on my computer.
    Thanks & have a great day.

    Aarond38
     
  14. Chutsman

    Chutsman Registered Member

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    Aarond, to rename your partitions, double click the MyComputer icon to show all the devices.

    R-click on the partition you want to rename. Rename it. Don't worry about the drive letter, it will re-appear after the rename.
     
  15. aarond38

    aarond38 Registered Member

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    Thanks a lot for the quick comeback Chutsman, I'll give it a try now. And also a big gratuitious thank-you for answering other posts I have made in the past!
    Have a wonderful week-end!

    Aarond38
     
  16. aarond38

    aarond38 Registered Member

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    OOPS, I am not given the opportunity to see all the partitions on my computer (Windows XP). I was able to rename the C drive but the only place I can find the partitions is in my "Computer Mngt. area but it will not let me make any changes there! What am I not seeing or what do I do next to change the partition names etc?
     
  17. Menorcaman

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

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    Hello aarond38,

    When you are in "Computer Management" > "Disk Management", do all the partitions that you see have drive letters? If not then, whilst still in "Disk Management", right click on a partition without a drive letter and select "Change Drive Letter and Paths". Click the "Add" button and select the appropriate drive letter.

    If all the partitions do have drive letters then they have probably been set to "Hidden", in which case you wouldn't be able to see them in Windows Explorer either. If that's the case then you will need a partition management utility or Windows "tweaking" tool to make them visible in Windows Explorer/My Computer again.

    By the way, when in "Disk Management", you can change a partitions Volume name. Just right click on a particular partition and select "Properties". On the "General" tab you will see the current Volume name, which you can amend accordingly.

    Regards
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2006
  18. aarond38

    aarond38 Registered Member

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    Thanks a lot Menorcaman, I'll head on over to disk mngt. & attempt to input your information. Have a great day!

    Aarond38
     
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