a bit of help needed - acronis true image corrupt

Discussion in 'backup, imaging & disk mgmt' started by steve10001, Oct 31, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. steve10001

    steve10001 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Posts:
    5
    Hello all,

    Wondered if anyone knew of a tool to extract anything out of a corrupt true image 11 home backup - it showed as being fine once the backup was made and it also validated ok, but now when i go to mount it, it says the image is corrupted.. a real bummer, any help would be greaty appreciated.

    thanx

    steve
     
  2. Osaban

    Osaban Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Posts:
    4,222
    Hi Steve,

    I have backed up many images and restored them successfully for years; in my experience validating images doesn't guarantee a successful restoration of the system. IMO you should try to restore when ever you backup your image. If you can't mount the image, that's it, usually one tries with another image.

    Perhaps you can try to post on the Acronis forum, they might have a tool to do what you are asking....

    http://forum.acronis.com/forums/acr...ce-products-discussions/acronis-true-image-ho
     
  3. layman

    layman Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2006
    Posts:
    217
    I've had more than a little experience of this particular headache, and it can be difficult to pin down the root cause. In my case, it turned out to be a machine (from Velocity Micro) that was dropping bits. The corruption always occurred during file movement, but I could never pin down the cause (the machine could run diagnostics for days on end without revealing any problem - I eventually just had to consign it to the scrap heap.) Unfortunately, Windows native facilities do not detect corruption during copy (no CRC checking occurs.) For moving large files, I began using CopyLargeFiles (from Gatherbird Software.) This served to ensure the integrity of a copy, but produced a highly fragmented file in the process.

    In our small business, we keep multiple copies (on different disks) of all backup images.
     
  4. Bob Bloch

    Bob Bloch Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2004
    Posts:
    28
    Hi Osaban: i assume your post implies that -

    (1) a disk image can verify/validate successfully but for some unknown reason not restore properly (therefore restore is ONLY true test of backup)

    (2) if validation/verification fails, the image is corrupted and will never restore

    If (1) is true (restore to be sure) there is risk involved with restoring an untested backup to a working HD. Can this risk be eliminated/minimized ?

    Thanx.
    Bewildered Bob o_O
     
  5. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Posts:
    8,647
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    Bob,

    My experience with imaging software is different again. Over the years I've restored thousands of images to the same and different HDs. I haven't seen a failed validate or restore and I've used a variety of apps. I've seen threads where one app could create and restore an image and another app couldn't. Bad RAM was blamed and the problem was fixed when the RAM was swapped out.

    Edit.. I did have one failed restore but that target HD failed the next day.
     
  6. Osaban

    Osaban Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Posts:
    4,222
    Hi Bob,

    I have never had a failed restore, and perhaps what I wrote in my previous post wasn't completely accurate. In the beginning I used to validate every image with Acronis 9 (I still use this version on one machine). Nowadays I don't validate backup images anymore (with Acronis TI 9 it is really time consuming about 20 minutes). I use Acronis on one machine, ShadowProtect Desktop on 2, and Paragon on 1. Restorations have always worked flawlessly with all of them without validation.

    When Wilders used to host the official Acronis forum, I remember one of the most common complaints was failed restorations from images which had had a successful validation. Brian K is probably right, there could be all sorts of other reasons for images to fail including hardware.

    I think the only way to know whether your image restores properly is to test it on a healthy system even though the first time it might give you some anxiety. If you have the time and inclination to validate, and the process fails then I wouldn't rely on that image.
     
  7. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Posts:
    8,647
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.