9.1 Workstation SATA2 recovery failure

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by geoffp, Dec 26, 2006.

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  1. geoffp

    geoffp Registered Member

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    Hi,

    I'm new here so don't beat me up too much. hehe

    I have built a new pc with 4 sata2 seagate 320gb hdd's.

    1 drive is purely for the acronis secure zone (~300gb).

    I have successfully imaged my c drive (30gb) & my documents (~100gb).

    When i hit f11 when rebooting to load the acronis boot software, none of the sata2 hdd's are recognised which is a s&*t and makes recovery from boot useless.

    I have read that there was a bit of a problem with acronis recognising certain hdd'd and controllers when loading the recovery software from boot (f11).

    Is there an update/fix to this and/or does the latest software version(s) now support sata2 hdd detection at boot reovery.

    I am currently running 9.1 workstation. This is the first pc I have built with no PATA hdd's (purely sata2 hdd's), hence my problem.

    I would have no problem in paying for an upgrade or purchasing a new version of acronis to achieve what I need as apart from this problem it has served me quite well.

    Thanks,

    Geoff.
     
  2. Tabvla

    Tabvla Registered Member

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    Hi Geoff, welcome to the Forum :D

    The most likely cause is that the Linux shell does not have the drivers that support your SATA disks. Not really Acronis' fault because Acronis - like all software manufacturers - is dependent upon the hardware manufacturer to write a driver for their hardware that will work under Linux.

    Suggest that you do the following: -

    1. Raise a support call with Acronis. They may have a driver.
    2. Raise a support call with the manufacturer of your SATA disks and request a Linux driver.

    PS... do you think Shane Warne could take early retirement.... like today?
     
  3. geoffp

    geoffp Registered Member

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    Hi Tabvla,

    Thanks for the prompt reply.

    My Acronis Secure Zone drive is a Maxtor 6L300S0 [Hard drive] (300.09 GB)s/n L60PX3CG, rev BANC1G10.

    My boot drive and 2 x data drives are all Seagate 320GB SATA2 ST3320620AS (320.07 GB).

    I take it we need the Linux drivers for the both types of drives to facilitate a read from the Maxtor and a write to the Seagate.

    I will do some hunting on the web first, then email Seagate and Maxtor now that I know Linux drives are required. If no luck I will then raise a support call with Acronis.

    As the Maxtor is older, I can always change the Secure Zone to a Seagate drive as well to reduce the need for a Maxtor Linux driver.

    :'( No not yet. Not EVER. LOL

    Cheers,

    Geoff.
     
  4. Tabvla

    Tabvla Registered Member

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    Hi Geoff

    Be a little careful with Linux drivers from the Internet. As you know Linux is an open OS which means that anyone can write a driver. Many members of the Linux community are competent, technically adept persons. But, like any community there are the cowboys.

    Your best course of action is to contact Seagate (who now own Maxtor) and ask them for drivers for both disks. The only really safe driver is one that has been written by the manufacturer, because only the manufacturer truly understands the subtle nuances of the hardware.
     
  5. geoffp

    geoffp Registered Member

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    understood - very valid point.
    Once I get the drivers, what do i do with them. Is there a way to install these into the MBR boot up option (F11)?
     
  6. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    The Linux drivers that you need are not for the hard drives but for the SATA chipset on your motherboard or SATA card. Contact the manufacturer of your PC/motherboard/SATA card for the drivers. With the right drivers, any hard drive will work on your system.
     
  7. geoffp

    geoffp Registered Member

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    thanks john :)
     
  8. Tabvla

    Tabvla Registered Member

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    Posted by JMK...
    Oops!! Agree. Apologies for directing you to the wrong source. (its that man Warne that has got me confused o_O )

    The best source is the manufacturer of the chipset, e.g. Promise.
     
  9. jelenko

    jelenko Registered Member

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    I disagree. TI is Acronis' product - to the extent they don't make drivers available to their users, it decreases the usefulness of their product.

    Of course, I'm not suggesting Acronis write the drivers, but they could be a LOT more aggressive in getting TI updated to include them.
    For example, IMHO, they should be continuing to update older TI versions with driver updates - otherwise, the only way to use your version 9 on new motherboards is to pay to update to version 10 [or whatever the latest version is].

    While I'm happy using my version 9 with the current pc's I have, I don't know what I'm going to do when it I build a new pc and the drivers aren't in.
     
  10. Tabvla

    Tabvla Registered Member

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    Linux is a community project. Much of what happens in Linux is provided by volunteers that create functionality in their own time for no reward.

    Software manufacturers don't write drivers for hardware products. It is up to the hardware manufacturer to decide which platforms they will support. If, for example, Promise or the Linux community have not written a driver for the Promise chipset on Linux then there isn't much that Acronis can do about it.

    Outside of Windows there are principally 3 boot options - DOS (e.g. FreeDOS); Linux or a simulated Windows environment such as BartPE. Acronis decided to go with Linux which may or may not have been the right decision. If your equipment is very new then you may have to wait sometime before a Linux driver is available.

    If you cannot wait then you will need to create a BartPE boot disk which is an Acronis supported plugin.
     
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