Making BOOT image from only one partition?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by fle, Aug 12, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. fle
    Offline

    fle Guest

    -One HDD is holding 2 partition.

    1 Making an image of only the first partition.
    2 install brand new HDD.
    3 Restoring the image.

    But is will not booto_O??

    //fle
  2. Menorcaman
    Offline

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

    Hello fle,

    You haven't really given us a lot to go on but my guess is you will find the answer in this previous thread titled <Restoring my C: drive>.

    Regards
  3. Acronis Support
    Offline

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

    Hello fle,

    Thank you for choosing Acronis Disk Backup Software.

    Menorcaman is correct advising you to read that thread.

    Actually you should do the following (depending on the type of the operating system) in order to make your restored operating system bootable:

    - Boot the computer from Windows 95/98/ME Startup Disk and run "fdisk /mbr" command;

    - Boot the computer from Windows 2000/XP Installation CD and run "fixmbr" command in Recovery Console.

    If you have any further questions please feel free to ask.

    Thank you.
    --
    Alexey Popov
  4. Artemisa
    Offline

    Artemisa Registered Member

    Using Windows XP-SP2 I'm confused with Acronis' recommendations, especially the remark in parentheses "(depending on the type of the operating system)".

    The Article by Dan Goodell says: Method #3 ("Kawecki's Trick"):
    If the clone has already been made ... we can fool Windows into thinking the previously assigned drive letters belong to partitions that no longer exist. Drive letters are remembered by partition signature, so by invalidating the previous signatures we can induce 2000/XP into releasing previously used drive letters for reassignment.

    One way of doing this is to alter or delete the DiskID in the MBR ... The easiest way to delete the DiskID is to use a Win98 boot floppy (aka, "Windows 98 Startup Disk").
    1. Boot the computer from the boot floppy, run the command "fdisk /mbr", remove the floppy, and
    2. reboot into 2000/XP.

    The NT/2000/XP "fixmbr" command replaces the MBR boot code but stops short of overwriting the four bytes of the DiskID that sits between the boot code and the partition table.
    The Win98 "fdisk /mbr" command will replace the boot code and zero the DiskID--albeit, unintentionally.
    As Kawecki points out, we can take advantage of that "mistake" because it has the effect of invalidating the partition signatures--since the signature is derived from the DiskID and Windows has to regenerate a new DiskID, it has to recalculate the signatures and assign new drive letters, abandoning any previous assignments.


    What I understand is: I have to use both:
    The Windows 98 Startup Disk AND "fixmbr" command in Recovery Console or at least reboot in XP in order to regenerate a new DiskID.

    My questions:
    1. Is this right?
    2. Is there a way to have this Windows 98 Startup Disk as a bootable CD (because I don't have a diskette drive with my laptop). How would I create this ISO?
    3. I downloaded the mbrautowrite_en.exe (CD version) from Acronis. What does it do?

    - Will it replace the boot code and zero the DiskID like the Windows 98 Startup Disk?
    - Or will it replace the MBR boot code and stop short of overwriting the four bytes of the DiskID, like the XP "fixmbr" command?

    Support from the experts would be appreciated very much.
    Thanks Artemisa
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2005
  5. Acronis Support
    Offline

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

    Hello Artemisa,

    In fact Both Windows 98/ME installation CD and Windows 2000/XP/2003 Installation CD have the same function that fixes MBR. The utility Acronis provides does the same thing as well and mostly used by customers who do not have full Windows Installation CD (some OEM versions can only restore the computer to the factory state but they do not allow you to install/reinstall Windows).

    Thank you.
    --
    Ilya Toytman
  6. Artemisa
    Offline

    Artemisa Registered Member

    Sorry Ilya,

    my question (besides questions 1. and 2.) was:
    What is mbrautowrite_en.exe (CD version) doing?
    - Will it replace the boot code and zero the DiskID like the Windows 98 Startup Disk?
    - Or will it replace the MBR boot code and stop short of overwriting the four bytes of the DiskID, like the XP "fixmbr" command?

    It would be very helpful for me if you/somebody else could help/answer this question.
    Because if it will replace the boot code and zero the DiskID, I wouldn't need a Windows 98 Startup Disk (that I can't use because of not having a diskette drive in my laptop).

    Artemisa
  7. Menorcaman
    Offline

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

    Hello Artemisa,

    There is no need to run both. If you think you have a Disk ID problem then boot from a Windows 98 Startup disk and run fdisk /mbr from the DOS prompt. This will zero-out the ID bytes and repair the MBR at the same time.

    I've just created an ISO of a Windows 98se startup floppy using Nero and WinISO. If you want, send me a forum Private Message containing your e-mail address and I'll forward it to you (approx 3.2MB).

    The latter.

    Regards
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2005
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.