Your take on enabling Backports - Ubuntu

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by Ocky, Dec 17, 2008.

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  1. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    I use Hardy, let's say I want the latest VLC, Firefox or OpenOffice, I would need to enable 'Backports' in the repos ? Probably not such a bright idea but I
    would like to ask anyway. They will break the 'stable'(S) in an LTS release. :D
     
  2. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    I would stay away, if you ask me. Having the latest and greatest might not be worth the chance of pain. If you have nothing to lose, don't mind being at the bleeding edge, then sure, go for it.

    I prefer stability over anything else.

    Mrk
     
  3. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    I have backports enabled, I see it of being of value when Hardy is 12 months old, they don't have a habbit of just throwing the latest software in (eg latest open office is not in).

    Cheers.
     
  4. Arup

    Arup Guest

    If you are adventurous by all means go ahead, I go for stability and thus 99% of my stuff is installed from regular Ubuntu repos, only Open Office 3 is from launchpad.
     
  5. Beavenburt

    Beavenburt Registered Member

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    I agree. Thats the main reason I left Arch in the end and went Debian. Breakages are just too much of a pain in the ass to rectify.
     
  6. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    Good thing about back ports is they dont alter any of the system or libraries so chances of breaking anything apart from what you are install/updating are slim.
     
  7. lewmur

    lewmur Registered Member

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    With the size of today's harddrives there is really no reason why you can't have your cake and eat it too. I have two partitions for my main distro. One stable and one experimental. When something new comes out, I install it on the experimental copy and test it thoroughly before I install it on the stable copy. If it does break something, I don't have to worry about diagnosing the problem. I just copy the stable version to the experimental partition and I'm back in business.
     
  8. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Nifty way ! Probably better than testing in VirtualBox as there is absolutely no
    guarantee that things working in VB will also work on the real HD. :argh:
     
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