Windows 7 a Linux Killer .. ha..ha

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by Ocky, Jan 21, 2009.

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  1. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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  2. Arup

    Arup Guest

    Point is why do they even bother to compare. Exactly what new grounds is Windows 7 breaking may I ask? Same old file system, same old registry, same old vulnerability to virus and spyware and keyloggers. I don't see the logic at all, there is absolutely no comparison.
     
  3. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    My thoughts exactly - you hit the nail on the head Arup. :)
     
  4. FastGame

    FastGame Registered Member

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    Some Linux users never lose their sense of reality (myself included), MS Windows is #1 by a huge margin on the desktop/work station....they don't need a "Linux Killer".

    MS needs the XP Killer, IMO Windows 7 will do the job that Vista couldn't....
     
  5. lewmur

    lewmur Registered Member

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    I've installed the Win 7 beta on one of my machines and I really don't see what all of the fuss is about. All it has succeeded in doing is making some of my hardware inoperable. IMO it is nothing more than than Vista SP2.

    First of all, the author claimed it would allow MS to use it to replace XP in the netbook market. How? Win 7 required a minimum of 8gb just to install. I have Puppy installed with a 1/2 gb and that is far more than is necessary.

    Also, you can buy a 4gb Asus eeePC for $350 and put a full OS and Office suite on it for nothing. To put Vista Home OEM and Office 2007 would make it cost around $750. I realize there are people who will pay that, just as there are people who will pay $2000 for a Mac. But it still leaves a big gap for those who have better things to spend their money on.
     
  6. rdsu

    rdsu Registered Member

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    We still have to wait for 01 April 2009... :D:D:D
     
  7. loli22

    loli22 Registered Member

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    spot on:thumb:
     
  8. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    What happens on April 1, 2009 - except the usual stuff, that is?
    Mrk
     
  9. ambient_88

    ambient_88 Registered Member

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    I think Microsoft is going to develop a netbook edition of Windows 7. Also, certified netbooks (those that meet Microsoft's requirement for Ultra-Low Cost PC) have at least 60GB of hard drive space (HDD), so 8GB is really not that much.
     
  10. lewmur

    lewmur Registered Member

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    Which proves Win 7 won't kill Linux in the netbook market because most netbooks won't meet that criteria. Most desktops in the ULC market will meet that criteria, but what buyer in that market is going to want to spend twice as much for software as they did for the hardware?

    Let's face it. MS can't compete with Linux in the low end market simply because of cost. Right now they still dominate that market for the simple reason that most people aren't familiar with Linux. But that is changing on an accelerated curve.
     
  11. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

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    Sorry It's not just familiarity. when main line commercial software houses write programs for Linux things might change. Until then I can't see Linux as a serious business alternative. I and many millions of others need windows to run a business. Give me real work programs and I will use Linux.
     
  12. lewmur

    lewmur Registered Member

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    Win 7 isn't going to change that dynamic. It already exists. But what will change it is the adaptation of Web based applications. Those are platform independent. It is inevitable that MS's strangle hold on the industry will dissipate.

    Right now I could set most businesses up with Linux running 90% of their apps and the truly MS dependent ones running in a virtual session. The only market I can see that will really be dependent on MS is high end gaming. And that will only last as long as the game writers continue to tie themselves to DirectX.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2009
  13. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

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    Let me put it another way. Linux is great BUT can you really see anyone but enthusiasts wanting to use Linux with a virtual session just so they can run their windows programs ? Web based may make a difference but so long as we have a desk based market and linux does not get real commercial software support I can't see it as a serious threat. Windows 7 doesn't need to be a linux killer.
     
  14. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    It's interesting that anyone should even mention a "linux killer" as that would imply that MS is in some way threatened by Linux, which I seriously doubt.

    I think Arup is right, there is no comparing the 2 anyway.
     
  15. Arup

    Arup Guest

    Why even kill each other, useful co-existence, thats the key. Windows can learn a lot from Linux, the darned registry has to go. Windows desperately needs a more improved file system, one that would't fragment after heavy use. Terrabytes are becoming commonplace, fragmented disk would make data painfully slow if one has to go through 2TB of data.
     
  16. lewmur

    lewmur Registered Member

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    Doesn't have to be an Linux "enthusiast." Just anyone who tired of being ripped off for an OS that is continually being attack by malware.
     
  17. Dark Shadow

    Dark Shadow Registered Member

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    Linux is what windows 7 will never be.Linux is linux and windows is windows and thats that.
     
  18. Arup

    Arup Guest


    Hype...............:D
     
  19. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hi mate,

    Linux is a great commercial success. Amazon alone has some half a million servers. Google more than a million. IBM, HP, Intel, Novell, another half a million servers or more ... it's the desktop that is not yet mature ...

    The commercial world belongs to unix/linux ... the desktop is MS domain, for now.

    Regards,
    Mrk
     
  20. tlu

    tlu Guest

    What are you missing?
     
  21. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    Why do you think you need Windows ?
    Why do you think Linux needs commercial software ?
    What real work programs do you need ?

    What's wrong with Dual booting, or having 2 separate machines ?

    Why do you think commercial software support is so important to the success of Linux ?
     
  22. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

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    Paperport, Quicken, WebResearch..........
     
  23. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

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    My comments relate only to desk based users. It's the desktop that is not yet mature is another way of saying the same thing. The desktop is MS domain for now - again I agree. Having commercial programs written for Linux rather than just MS and occasionally Mac wouldn't hurt though would it ?
     
  24. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

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    Roboform, Omniform, Quicken, WebResearch, Paperport.....
    Perhaps I'm mistaken but I thought almost all end user software had an MS version, some work with Mac and Linux ...... was kind of a DIY OS.

    From what I have seen of various distros it all looks fine but I can't see the average user ( me) switching until any program that I want will run on linux.
    Dual booting, separate machines ( I have 7) and virtual are all very well for some but for the mass market - I don't think so
     
  25. lewmur

    lewmur Registered Member

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    YOU don't think so? That's nice. But you obviously don't understand "virtual." You can have a "Quicken, PaperPort or Webresearch" icon right on your Linux desktop and not even know they are running from a Virtualbox XP session.

    Yes, it would be better if co.s like Quicken made Linux versions of their product. But people like yourself are delaying that time by sticking by Windows "through thick and thin." It is a catch 22. People won't switch to Linux because it doesn't support their favorite toy. And the toy co. won't write a Linux version because there aren't enough people using Linux.

    But that catch 22 is being broken. More and more people are switching to Linux and either finding a Linux toy to replace the Windows one, or running their Windows toy in a virtual sandbox. Either would be preferable to running Windows natively just because of the malware factor.

    It would also help if the educational system would recognize there are alternatives to Windows. There are classes, and even schools, that demand their students have Windows based computers. That should be enough for the Justice Department's Anti-trust division to sue MS. But even in that realm things are changing. Computer departments are now teaching students that the future of coding is in web based computer languages. (And note that these languages can also be used to code programs to run locally. Not just on the web.) That means the programmers of the future will be writing platform independent programs.

    Is Windows going to die? Of course not. But it IS going to lose its monopoly position. And it won't be just because of Apple.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2009
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