Why is Windows considered to have a lack of privacy?

Discussion in 'privacy problems' started by DesuMaiden, Mar 31, 2014.

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  1. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    Its easier to just go Linux and forget all this activation stuff.
     
  2. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    or use a version of Windows that:
    1, doesn't require online activation.
    2, doesn't call home for anti-piracy or other reasons.
    3, doesn't require an external device to block access to open ports.
    4, doesn't store extensive user activity records.
    5, runs fast on hardware that can barely power newer Windows OS at all.
    6, doesn't require 3rd party tools or separate operating systems to access every file and folder.
    7, doesn't complain when moved to different hardware. Just install the needed drivers and go.
     
  3. MisterB

    MisterB Registered Member

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    I wouldn't worry too much about activation as a privacy threat. If that is really a concern, just use a windows computer that uses slic activation. That would be any computer that comes with Windows pre-installed and pre-activated by the manufacturer. There would be no distinguishing mark to differentiate that copy of Windows from all the others that were installed in the same model. All come with the same PID from the same OEM image that the manufacturer used.

    I would be more concerned about the logging and knowing what gets logged and where the logs are located and how to disable the logging services.
     
  4. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    Yeah that's what I did. And there is so many distros to choose from that your are bound to find something you like.
    I still keep Windows 7 netbook as a back up for those rare occasions when customer support tech argues with me that the reason why XYZ is not working is because I use Linux.
     
  5. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    I use a 7 Ultimate VM to do stuff with. I am growing with Linux but I still run into those things that I don't have the "skill set" to conquer yet. That list gets shorter every month. It makes me mad when I have to use a windows VM because I am too stupid to do something in Linux. LOL!!!
     
  6. Gitmo East

    Gitmo East Registered Member

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    Heres the I-BlockList for
    I haven't used peerblock for years but it"s good to see the block lists still been updated.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2014
  7. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    What people say that please?
    Mrk
     
  8. wat0114

    wat0114 Registered Member

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    I need Windows for Netflix :D
     
  9. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    No you don't.
     
  10. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    Ubuntu should work right out of the box. What things are not working out for you?
     
  11. wat0114

    wat0114 Registered Member

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    You mean there's an easy way as in simply launching the browser? But if you mean with Wine or some other convoluted approach, then that's not an option for me.
     
  12. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    The biggest issue for me is printer drivers. e.g. - when my printer is low on ink, or if I want to scan and save something. As long as my printer is "perfect" then I can print fine in linux. When my ink is low (often, since I am cheap) linux just refuses to print. It may be my novice skill set. I am going to buy a new printer when my ink runs out. I only need monotone and I use it at home for less than 20 pages a month, but when I need it I need it. I never stumble across a "home category" printer where there is a REAL Linux driver supporting the device. For me its the weak link to a 100% transition from windows to Linux. I literally print 100 pages out of my cartridges after the ink warning goes off. It is also probably due to the fact that my volume of printing is low on a per month basis.

    I have a few other things but I know those are because I use my windows VM as a crutch. If I didn't have the windows VM available I would be forced to develop some more linux skills at a faster pace. Things some don't do much but I do all the time. e.g. - filesystem wipes of free space, etc.... Yes, I know linux does those things but I use well developed software that I trust and am quite familiar with.

    For now, got an answer on the printer driver? Not just print a page when all is well, but over-riding the error and printing anyway. Any windows drive will do that all day long.
     
  13. Pfipps

    Pfipps Registered Member

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    Printer and scanner issues are a reason why I still use Windows. For example, Brother makes scanner drivers available for linux, but they are VERY limited.
    I can't even do duplex scanning.
     
  14. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    Hmmm I don't have a printer or scanner so I don't have much say on this subject. However I do keep a small netbook for those few situations that I need to do something that Linux is not good at.
     
  15. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    For me, printing is a non-issue. IMO, a computer should replace paper, not provide an easy means to use more. I loaned my printer/scanner to a friend who has thousands of old pictures to scan and convert to files.

    If I had the patience and spare time to start over, linux or BSD would be an option. As it sits now, I've got more to do than I have time for. I can't afford to spend months or years learning to harden and strip linux to the same extent as I can Windows. Even if I could, I question just how much it would gain me.
     
  16. act8192

    act8192 Registered Member

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    Big rant
    There are printer needs here. Often we have to submit something on paper to a bank, government, or some other institution.
    The lack of printer driver is keeping me off Linux. Linux just incapable of doing it. I asked on this forum several times. No answers. Searched some Linux forum. No answer other than for a printer I don't have.
    My printer is Canon MP970. Canon doesn't do Linux drivers for my printer. They don't care.
    Linux creators/gurus/experts people don't either. They don't care.
    Printer doesn't require much - some internal translations which I don't understand of course. TCP connection out. UDP both ways so that the printer can print and also tell me it's out of paper or out of ink. None of this is possible in Linux. I tried both in Mandriva and now Linux Mint. No go.
    And as noone-particular said now or before, no application firewall. Unknown security/privacy status other than anecdotal stuff about how safe it is. Just like Mac.
    End of rant
    Staying with Windows allows me to do what I need to do. Activation or no activation.
     
  17. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    Why change what ain't broke?
    For me Windows was inevitably broken by the NSA so I said goodbye to it.
     
  18. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    The current versions of Windows
    Regarding the current versions of Windows, I totally agree that they're broken and open to the NSA by design. The extent to which other current operating systems (linux, BSD) is unclear at best. IMO, all current operating systems are vulnerable to compromise or deliberate weakening via their update mechanisms, either through compromising the servers, MITM attacks on the traffic, or coercing specific individuals from the companies. There's another lesson that needs to be learned from the Snowden leaks. Update servers, repositories, and the infrastructure that links them to our equipment is part of our attack surface and is vulnerable. Since my operating system is officially unsupported, that part of my attack surface has been largely eliminated.
     
  19. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    For me windows is broken for the ethical reasons. My laptop is probably hacked by the three letter agencies just because I browse this forum. But at least I am not paying for it nor am I supporting financially companies that allow this kind of behavior.
     
  20. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    You know that last statement is a product of your fiction, right?
    Mrk
     
  21. Pfipps

    Pfipps Registered Member

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    If we are going this far with chances, I'd venture to guess Linux has "safety valves" as well. Linus Torvalds has said that only a few people really know the kernel very well.
    Some backdoors in a BSD distro I forgot comes to mind, and I wouldn't be surprised that the SSL "heartbeat" vulnerability in OpenSSL wasn't a mistake.
     
  22. MisterB

    MisterB Registered Member

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    I don't use Linux on laptops due to driver and convenience issues mainly. I do a lot of document preparation work and having a good printer scanner setup is an absolute necessity. The other thing that I couldn't get working fully with Linux was ACPI. I never got Linux to suspend and hibernate properly and I use those features in Windows a lot.

    On the server side of things, I only use Linux and would never host a website on a Windows server. I do have one project that I would like to use Linux for at the moment: I would like to set up the open source Softether VPN server on my home internet connection so I could have a secure VPN connection through my own home connection and use my home IP when I'm not at home. For that project, I would like the most minimal hardware and Linux distro that would do the job. Something like the bottom half of an old Thinkpad would do but an even smaller and more minimal box would be better.
     
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