Why I’m staying with Debian

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Pedro, Sep 10, 2007.

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  1. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

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    by Bruce Byfield

    Good read for anyone considering Debian. I don't have his experience, but already i get the feeling this is it for me.

    There is no corporation, only a huge community, which is what i expect GNU/Linux to be. That's another thing, they specifically state it's Debian GNU/Linux, giving full credit to the bigger and older project. They defend free software.
    I have the impression this is NOT always true for all distros.

    From what i read, others state Arch is best for the experienced, but i don't exactly understand this. Debian has everything, and you can install a fairly basic system if you want. If not, Debian does make it simple for most things.
    You can choose how stable or how recent you want your OS, easy to maintain.
    I'd like some Arch/ Slackware user to comment this for more detailed input though. Correcting what i got wrong.

    Just wanted to share this blog with you good people, and to say i'm sticking with Debian. Love it :D
     
  2. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

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    Here's a quote from the arch wiki in regard to debian:
    From my experience, I have found a slight speed advantage in arch (due to optimizations and using the latest packages), but I have also found the system to be simpler. I just love how simple everything is, and how much of it can be managed directly from the rc.conf file. Also, the build system is nice for packaging up packages you built from source, and it is very similar to a bsd ports system. It is the distro that best fits me, but if I ever feel like the stable and stringent testing sector, I always have openbsd for that :p . Both are two of the best linux distro's, and you can't go wrong with either one of them. Just try them out, and see which one you prefer and feel more comfortable with. Also, see which one's goals correlate to what you want and desire, and choose from there.

    --edit--
    I forgot to talk about the release systems. Not having too much experience with debian, I am pretty sure everything is released based (don't know if they have a "current" branch), but I much prefer rolling release type systems for a desktop. It makes it easier not having to worry about doing a whole set of changes at once, but instead do them each time you update once every two weeks or so. Arch is great since having the entire the system update just involves typing pacman -Syu, while for openbsd or freebsd, I choose to follow the current branches which incorporate the latest and greatest (including some bugs :p), so I just install snapshots every two weeks for openbsd and build world every two for freebsd. Just a personal preference though and there are pros and cons to each approach (for a server I would just follow the stable branches or something like debian though)

    Cheers,

    Alphalutra1
     
  3. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    After playing with more than a dozen distros and a few BSD variants for over 10 months, I finally decided on Debian also. For me it just seemed best. I am on Win now, but if and when I run Linux, I will run Debian.
     
  4. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

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    This makes me choose Debian too. It's not that i'm a fanatic over night, and i have nothing against other perspectives, but reading from Stallman makes me understand the importance.
    Curiosity is rising. Once i looked around enough in Debian, i'll get Arch and try it. Then OpenBSD (next year :p ). You sure have a way to put things.
    How does Arch handle dependencies? Like Debian it will solve that, or it's up to you?
    By rolling you mean only one version, the current one?
    In Debian you can get the latest, but since it wasn't tested enough by Debian community, it's not "stable".
    I agree with you that it comes down to personal preference, and it makes this world more colorful. Our systems are compatible, but each is different. Nice.
    Good to hear from another Debian user here. It could prove helpful.
     
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