Why East-Tec, CyberScrub, etc. re: Ccleaner

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by MarcGabi, Apr 15, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. MarcGabi

    MarcGabi Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Posts:
    28
    Hello.

    I'm not sure that this belongs in this section.

    Can anyone say if there are any advantages to software such as East-Tec Eraser, CyberScrub Privacy Suite, etc. in relation to Ccleaner, particularly because Ccleaner is free?

    Do these other software programs offer any advantages over Ccleaner?

    Thank you again.
     
  2. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2011
    Posts:
    1,163
    No idea on the features .vs each other. Check out Privazer and donate if you can. Nothing says you can't use a bunch of free ones at the same time, either. You can use CCleaner, Clean After Me, BleachBit, and Privazer, at 6 hour intervals using Task Scheduler.

    Also remember that these things are for keeping a drive as clean as possible BUT THERE WILL STILL BE STUFF ON THERE. Encrypt the drive if you don't want ANY tracks available (and the drive is not mounted when examined).

    PD
     
  3. LinuxKungFu

    LinuxKungFu Registered Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Posts:
    11
    The only way to be sure is to physically destroy the hard disk even if the whole drive is encrypted.
     
  4. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2011
    Posts:
    1,163
    Brazilian Daniel Dantas' drives have revealed no information after being thrashed on, by the US FBI. While you are correct that an Acid Slurry would be best (If you don't want to use the drive any longer), it isn't always needed, IMO...especially if you want to keep using the drive, and are doing this for privacy reasons, related to completely legal activities.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Dantas


    PD
     
  5. clubhouse

    clubhouse Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Posts:
    180
    I remember reading on another site by a 'security expert' that the only way to ensure that files can't be restored or read from a hdd is to melt it to a liquid state:D .....If I ever had top secret documents that I wanted to 'destroy' its the method I would use lol.
     
  6. Taliscicero

    Taliscicero Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Posts:
    1,439
    One pass deletion is enough to wipe a drive, encryption once with truecrypt is enough. Dantas knows this and is not retarded enough to use a password less then 20 digits. Anything over 20 is secure to almost any attack be it dictionary or code, so long as you mix in lower/upper/num/symb. Anyone that thinks you need more such as acid or destroying a disk is not well versed.
     
  7. MarcGabi

    MarcGabi Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Posts:
    28
    Thank you for all of your responses. I appreciate it.
     
  8. anniew

    anniew Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2013
    Posts:
    92
    Great point.

    I do think the standard changes with time, as the ability/speed to crack passwords increases as computers gain in power.

    Today, 20 is theoretically much more than enough for anyone who is not a "high value target". Just don't use twenty zeros in a row or an easily "guessable" passphrase "Happy21stBirthdayMe!".

    With the use of password managers, does anyone know if it is now possible / practical to use passwords that contain "characters" that are not on the keyboard?

    IIRC, each keyboard character is a two byte combo, but not all two byte combos are mapped to the keyboard (i.e. are "type-able"). Seems to me that would certainly increase the "strength" of a 20 character password exponentially, unless password generators embedded in the PW manager programs take advantage of this already.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.