Which Mint Desktop?

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by Wendi, Sep 16, 2010.

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  1. Wendi

    Wendi Registered Member

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    Hi guys,

    I'm very comfortable with Windows (still running XP) and I know nothing about Linux. However, I'd really like to get aquainted with Linux by using a live CD version.

    To that end, someone suggested Linux Mint (http://linuxmint.com/download.php) but once there I got totally confused with all of the 'Desktop' variations. Which one should I go for?

    Also, do these live CDs come with a web browser and email client? If not, what do you suggest?

    Thanks in advance for any guidance.
     
  2. Eice

    Eice Registered Member

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    For Linux, the graphical desktop (among other things) can be swapped at will, and due to this you have a choice of different graphical desktops. They'll look, feel, and operate rather differently from each other, but underneath it's the same flavor of Linux.

    Basically it's a matter of personal preference. GNOME is the default desktop, so go with it if you're unsure. You can in fact switch between desktop managers without having to redownload the corresponding ISO and install it, but I suppose that will come later if you're entirely new to Linux.

    And yes, Mint comes with a browser (Firefox) and email client (Thunderbird).
     
  3. Wendi

    Wendi Registered Member

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    Eice, thanks so much for your quick reply. As I am comfortable using Windows, would any of the Mint desktops appear more familiar than the others?
     
  4. Eice

    Eice Registered Member

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    Hard to say. UI-wise, the KDE interface looks pretty similar to Windows ("Start menu" at lower left, taskbar at bottom, systray at lower right), but once you really start delving into things, it's a different story. But then, that's pretty much the whole point.

    The GNOME desktop for Mint has been customized to resemble the Windows layout as well, though. Have a look at the screenshots on the Mint website.

    My personal preference? I like GNOME, but plenty of people swear by KDE.
     
  5. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    take a look

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fho-Q9w_gdo

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHS0GItw-X8&feature=related

    it running on virtual machine you can also check while using live cd

    youtube is full of it you get an idea of look i use gnome but there are people who love kde its up to user choice


    http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Linux Mint 9 Isadora

    also for kde

    http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Linux Mint 9 kde

    there are planty of videos just get a look you get idea about linux
     
  6. Wendi

    Wendi Registered Member

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    Hey guys, thanks again. I think I'll download a few different Mint-live desktop variants and see how they work for me. After all, it just costs me a few CDs. :p
     
  7. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    you are welcome windy

    try kde and gnome they are main distros

    while fluxbox lxde xfce are light weight distro made for old system or to make system run pretty fast but you get some problem using them as they are not as user friendly as main distro

    so if your pc is above Pentium 4 (ie dual core core 2 duo quad core or i3......etc) i recommend you try kde and gnome also leave Debian base distro its not for newbie you find more trouble with that flavor
     
  8. Wendi

    Wendi Registered Member

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    Thank you for that insight (my PC is a 5-year old Pentium 4 with 1GB RAM + a Matrox 32MB graphics card) ...and btw, it's Wendi, not windy! ;)
     
  9. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    ops sorry

    hmmm gnome or xfce would be nice.......kde would be little heavy :p

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWyX1Xkqi3Y
     
  10. Eice

    Eice Registered Member

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    You can use UNetBootIn to burn the ISOs to a USB drive instead of CD. Google for it.
     
  11. Wendi

    Wendi Registered Member

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    mack_guy, thanks for the youtube link!


    That's pretty cool Eice (and certainly convenient)! Would a live OS run faster from an external USB drive than from CD?
     
  12. cgeek

    cgeek Registered Member

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    KDE is not as heavy as you all may think. I have Arch running on a P4 3.0 1.5gb ram and a ATi X850XT PE.
    @ Wendi
    If you have the time you can look at this site to see all the different distros that are available.
    Welcome to the Linux family and enjoy your stay! :) If you ever have any questions don't be afaid to ask. We will be glad to help.

    Kind Regards,
    Cgeek
     
  13. Wendi

    Wendi Registered Member

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    Thank you for the welcome and the offer of support - I'm sure to have many noob questions!

    I've downloaded Mint & PCLOS (both with xfce desktop). This evening I'll burn them to CDs (hopefully at least one of them will like my 5-yr old PC). :doubt:
     
  14. Wendi

    Wendi Registered Member

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    Eice, unfortunately my old PC's BIOS doesn't support booting from USB (and there are no more updates)! So I'll have to run Linux from CD afterall.
     
  15. Longboard

    Longboard Registered Member

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    Should be no prob depending somewhat on HW specs

    If you want to put Ubuntu or Mint on a PC with easy removal and no partitioning issues: For Ubuntu:Wubi
    http://wubi-installer.org/
    Simple install proceedure to HD, installs as a "file" and "programme" as per any other executable ( better than most installs infact)and can easily be cleanly removed from add remove panel.
    For Mint: mint4win
    Dont sweat any/the "performance loss" likely still faster than MS on older HW

    To get to mint4win, burn Mint.iso to Cd and explore CD:
    Run the "mint4win" program located in the CD image.

    OR:

    Download .iso use virtual clone drive ( -http://www.slysoft.com/en/virtual-clonedrive.html- a very useful tool) in windows to mount and explore drive...full tutorial here:
    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/20079/install-linux-mint-on-your-windows-computer-or-netbook/

    My experience with wubi and m-4-win has been very good: easy install and more importantly easy uninstall.
    Moderately annoying having to reboot to get back and forth but small price to pay.

    Wendi: have you given some thought to VBox or VM Player: also great tools to learn *nix and easy to run, intuitive and FREE.
    Can have Linux VM up and running in Windows without rebooting.
    :thumb:

    PS:
    Sorry..cant help myself: one of the.best.primers.anywhere. re VMPlayer:
    http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/vmware_player.html
    Lots of other quasi-useful shyte on that site :D LOL
    Good info re VBox
    Lots of ready made linux VMs for the free VMplayer here:
    http://www.vmware.com/appliances/directory/cat/508
    There might be HW strains on an older box ?
    Other standard advice here is to make a system image for recovery JIC.
    :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2010
  16. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    Last edited: Sep 18, 2010
  17. katio

    katio Guest

    When it comes to ease of use (and support!) for a linux beginner I'd say:
    gnome>xfce>kde>lxde>fluxbox
    When it comes to most important part of any Desktop Environment, the Window Manager (because the rest of the software stack can be swapped pretty easily*):
    lxde (openbox) > fluxbox > kde (kwin)> gnome (metacity with compiz) > xfce (xfwm)
    when it comes to integration of software and the DE:
    kde (but not with gtk apps like firefox and openoffice!) > gnome > xfce > lxde > fluxbox

    All IMO of course...

    If you want my honest opinion, the way to go is starting with vanilla ubuntu, no X, no WM, no DE and then add whatever you want to get your own optimised system.


    * though you can also do stuff like run gnome together with openbox for example
     
  18. Wendi

    Wendi Registered Member

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    Thank you all so much. I'm almost ready to dive-in.
     
  19. cgeek

    cgeek Registered Member

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    So, which one did you pick?
     
  20. Cvette

    Cvette Registered Member

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    This thread has been quite helpful, I was for a while using Mint 9. But will now be switching over to Mint 9 KDE (I'm a sucker for eye-candy). Thanks everyone!
     
  21. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    you dont need to install another kde you can add kde desktop as well in your system you can switch between both
     
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