What’s the rule when installing programs?

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by sweater, Mar 4, 2006.

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  1. sweater

    sweater Registered Member

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    Actually, I don’t have any problems with this thing that I am talking now. But it just confuses me a bit. Is there a rule to follow when we are installing certain types of programs in our pc? I mean, maybe, some programs will functions more efficiently and effectively if they are installed in the default C drive instead of installing them in D drive? :rolleyes: :cautious: :blink: o_O

    The other thing that made me think was that…is it more important to have more free spaces in C drive than in D drive coz Windows was installed in that drive? :rolleyes: o_O
     
  2. trickyricky

    trickyricky Registered Member

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    It really depends on the program, there isn't an answer that covers all programs.

    If a program offers you a choice during setup, then it's entirely up to your where you decide to put it. If you have an almost-empty D drive, then put them there if they will let you.

    Some programs, on the other hand, won't let you choose where to install them and trying to force them into another location is asking for trouble.
     
  3. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    I don't know any global rules, I know my rules:

    Create a system restore point before installation.
    Install program.

    I keep all programs on the same partition as Windows.

    Mrk
     
  4. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    I don't have a sequence, because I install my software without internet connection.

    What I don't like is that some softwares require an internet connection for installation.
    Every software should have the possibility to be installed without requiring an internet connection.
    I only know two examples : MS AntiSpyware beta1 and A-squared (A2), but there are probably more of them.
    You can't install MSAS and A2 without being on-line.
     
  5. sweater

    sweater Registered Member

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    That's why I have ERUNT...:D it saves me many times. The registry I think is the most important thing that was affected during installations of any programs.

    It just got me to think if some programs will functions more better if installed only in the default C drive. Some of my programs like my antivirus was installed in D drive and still works fine...:cool:
     
  6. WSFuser

    WSFuser Registered Member

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    with all those files that need loading, games are a good example of software that would benefit from a seperate partition or drive. ur download folder for p2p could also be on a seperate drive. for most software tho, i think the installation location makes little difference.
     
  7. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    Right on!
    Separate partitions for games / p2p. And even page file on the main partition of the other hdds (when possible).
    Mrk
     
  8. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    I thought PageFile was only ONE object.
    Can you copy this object on each main partition of FOUR physical harddrives, if you have them ?
     
  9. crofttk

    crofttk Registered Member

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    You definitely don't want to try copying them but, in the dialogue illustrated below, :

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v351/crofttk/Page.jpg

    I can specifiy a pagefile to be maintained on any one, more than one, or ALL of these drives (including the drives further down the list :cool:) if I want to.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2006
  10. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    Meanwhile I have been reading about the pagefile and I don't want to copy it anymore as an "User of a lesser God". :D

    I guess you do it this way :
    At Control Panel | System | Advanced, click Settings in the “Performance” Section. On the Advanced page of the result, the current total physical size of all page files that may be in existence is shown. Click Change to make settings for the Virtual memory operation. Here you can select any drive partition and set either ‘Custom’; ‘System Managed’ or ‘No page file’; then always click Set before going on to the next partition.

    But my new RAM = 2048 MB. So I don't need more than one pagefile.
    I'm just going to move the pagefile to the first partition of my second harddisk and the second partition will be used for personal files.
     
  11. crofttk

    crofttk Registered Member

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    I expect those users that actually need more than one pagefile are few and far between.

    In addition, when you're at the 2048 MB of RAM, you'd need a good reason to allow a pagefile as large as the Windows recommended amount -- usually about 1.5 times the amount of RAM you have, as in my case with 2048 MB of RAM. Even my 2048 MB pagefile is a stretch except that I occasionally load huge graphics files into Adobe Photshop Elements and this size is "just in case".
     
  12. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    On my gaming rig, I have two hdds with separate heads. So I use the main partition of the second drive for page file as well, because then resources are used off that head rather than primary head, making for better utilization. But making several page files on the SAME hdd but different partitions is a waste of space. But if you have enough space (300+ Gb), you can easily afford to put away 4-5Gb for page file. That plus 4Gb system restore plus 1-2Gb recycle bin hardly ammount to about 3% of the overall space.
    Mrk
     
  13. eurekamind

    eurekamind Registered Member

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    We can perform the registry backup/restore using REGEDIT command feature from : Start>Run>regedit....(within it Import and Export utility is given)

    then what is the benefit of doing it using ERUNT?

    does ERUNT takes the registry backup automatically before any installation?

    Is ERUNT compatible with WIN-9x?
     
  14. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    Erunt can restore your registry from DOS. Imported / exported regs need a working environment to be used.
    Mrk
     
  15. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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    Hi sweater,

    As already mentioned by others:
    set a restore point prior to installation or
    use ERUNT to save the Registry prior to installation

    Other than that, you can also use a tool like:
    Total Uninstall (v2.35 is freeware) which takes a snapshot of important system files prior to installation, do the installation, and if at a later date you need to uninstall it, Total Unistall will remove all the remenants that were installed.
    Or Installwatch (which does the same thing).

    -- Tom

    P.S. See page 11 here for Total Uninstall (freeware version): http://www.321download.com/LastFreeware/page10.html#Total Uninstall
    Installwatch v2.5: http://www.episonsquared.com/ (freeware)
     
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