What's keeping you from transferring to Linux?

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by Infected, Jun 19, 2020.

  1. chrisretusn

    chrisretusn Registered Member

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    Hehe, This applies to me also, except it's with Windows.

    I've been using Linux for ages. I do have Windows 10 installed in a VirtualBox virtual machine. I don't feel comfortable in Windows. The last time I felt okay with Widows was maybe Widows XP or Windows NT, even Windows For Work Groups. LOL.
     
  2. Stupendous Man

    Stupendous Man Registered Member

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    What kept me from migrating to Linux, for a few years, was the fact that I thought there would be a steep learning curve. Therefore, I collected helpful documentation, for some time. When finally, January 2020, I migrated to Kubuntu, I noticed there was hardly a learning curve, just some things that were different, like the filesystem. The only thing that puzzled me, before migrating, was what mount point to assign to my second internal drive. But that proved simpler than I thought. (I chose to assign mount point: /home/[username]/[label for second drive], and next changed that second drive's ownership to user, using Krusader file manager in root mode.)
    Almost half a year using Kubuntu, it feels as much at home as Windows 7 did, if not more. And it's much easier housekeeping. :)
     
  3. wat0114

    wat0114 Registered Member

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    The way I see it, it's nice to have another option, and to be reasonably competent with the use of either one. It gives one a choice at the drop of a hat. I keep Win 10 Pro as another option in my dual-boot laptop setup. I have become very comfortable with Linux and since my home needs are simple, I use it primarily for most of the following reasons:

    1. Privacy - does not leak info like Windows
    2. Security - Little required, easy to set up and less to worry about than Windows, though I took things much further using Apparmor.
    3. Updates. Very fast and seamless
    4. Stable and fast using Debian
     
  4. JEAM

    JEAM Registered Member

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    That illustrates the sort of thing that IMHO deters a lot of "normal" people from making the transition to Linux. In Windows, we have drives C, D, etc. and don't need to think anything more about it. In Linux, we're talking "mount points," "ownership," "root mode" and the like. Most of these concepts also exist in Windows, but they are (mercifully) largely hidden from non-techie users who would rather just get on with their work or play. Linux won't achieve widespread adoption until it becomes as simple to use as Windows or Android.

    Windows is for people who want to hop in the car and drive to their friends' house. Linux still seems to be more for people who are just as happy staying at home tinkering with the car. :)
     
  5. RoamMaster

    RoamMaster Registered Member

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    The biggest reason is file system. If I could install Mint to an NTFS file system, I wouldn't mind dual booting. But I don't want to have a lack of common files. I need Windows period, so the question is more "dual boot, or only windows". I go with "Only windows" because Linux is almost impossible to integrate alongside Windows.
     
  6. Stupendous Man

    Stupendous Man Registered Member

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    I think most 'normal people' won't do much tinkering at all, most users will use their computers with more or less default installation.
    The group of people that want a personalized installation will need to learn how, I don't think that is much different with Windows, Linux, or any OS.
    For instance, before I found my way around Windows, assigning Windows' special folders Documents, Downloads, Music, Pictures and Videos to another drive was just as puzzling as assigning the correct mount point to a second internal drive in Kubuntu. Once you know what to do, it's both simple. It's different, that's all.
     
  7. The Hammer

    The Hammer Registered Member

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    Mac OS just does it for me.
     
  8. Bertazzone

    Bertazzone Registered Member

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    No explanation needed. :thumb:
     
  9. Circuit

    Circuit Registered Member

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    What's keeping you from transferring to Linux?
    Too lazy and old to learn.
     
  10. SAustn2

    SAustn2 Registered Member

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    I think the hardest part for me was partitioning the drive since I wanted Ubuntu and Windows Xp, was never sure about how to make the swap partition since it was different than ext 4 journaling file system. But actually since Xp was installed first it wasn't really that hard. Back then Ubuntu came with a pretty good installer.
     
  11. SAustn2

    SAustn2 Registered Member

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    Aww come on Circuit, I'm 55 and still learning. :D And lazy too most of the time! You can do it if you really want it or are interested enough. :)

    BTW like your location send me some Almonds.
     
  12. Iangh

    Iangh Registered Member

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    Yes, but as somebody who came to Linux a few years ago it isn't as straightforward as Windows, it's more akin to MS-DOS, which I can vaguely remember (just about). I found it confusing learning sudo, sudo nano, sudo rm -r, taking ownership, etc., because learning it involved coming across a problem and googling to seek a solution. If you're a noob it's very easy to throw in the towel because the solution presents more questions as the answer usually involves a discussion between people who already know Linux command-line. I don't come from a programming background, and on my elec eng degree back in the early 80's I hated the programming electives because I was useless at programming. Anybody switching from Windows to Linux, who doesn't come from a techy background, needs the grit and gumption to persevere in learning the basics of Linux command-line. We really need a "The basics of Linux command-line: what noobs to Linux need to know" article. Mrkvonic would do a really good job at this.
     
  13. SAustn2

    SAustn2 Registered Member

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  14. Iangh

    Iangh Registered Member

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    I was wondering whether there is a concise, pithy 5-pager "must-know" for the noob.:) Have moved it to my Linux folder, which contains instructions on how to install Kubuntu, such as how to auto-mount a network share, etc. Next time I have a "what the" command-line question I shall consult my new oracle.
     
  15. JEAM

    JEAM Registered Member

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    Back in the '80s there were several manuals (not too thick) that nicely categorized and explained the different kinds of MS-DOS commands, their syntax, what they each did and in what situations they were used. Peter Norton's guide was my favorite one. Could even page through it while sitting on the throne. ;)

    Wonder if there is anything for Linux, printed on paper, that's as handy and concise as Norton's guide. One problem is that there are so many different versions of Linux and they don't necessarily use the same CLI commands, so any attempt at explanation becomes that much more complicated. Lotta stuff (relevant or otherwise) to wade through. And less need to learn it, too, since nowadays one can do most things via the GUI.
     
  16. Sm3K3R

    Sm3K3R Registered Member

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    The annoying thing is the way things were directed, as such that a user to not be able to have them easily in a dual boot, Windows and some linux distro i mean.In my experience, at some moment in time, some updates (BIOS, linux or Windows) will kill or bug the other/linux installation.
    So having 2 machines(one with windows and one with a distro) is needed, if linux is seen as an alternative .The BIOS "bugs" will force users most of the time to drop efforts in keeping both on the same machine. After some time the user will keep ON the Windows one most of the time, because it gets most of the jobs done.If the user likes 3d gaming the choice is still Windows for compatibility and lag freeness.
    In a corporate world is hard to see linux winning space, unless included in "the game" (this will make developers to love it), but then it will be the same story ?! :)
     
  17. StealthyTrojan

    StealthyTrojan Registered Member

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    Gaming is better on Windows, I use Microsoft Office for work, I like Windows, why would I change.
     
  18. reasonablePrivacy

    reasonablePrivacy Registered Member

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    I specifically referred to line "who understand a bit more about operating systems".
     
  19. chrisretusn

    chrisretusn Registered Member

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    Yes, agree. I am a Linux full time user, I do have Windows 10 in VirtualBox, BUT a virtual machine just doesn't cut it for games.

    I have a game I play daily on my cell phone, the vendor PC version, however, it only works on Windows and MAC.
     
  20. chrisretusn

    chrisretusn Registered Member

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    Yes, this is a quite common excuse. I'd say it is a no longer a valid excuse The need to use the command line is on part with using the command line in Windows for most of the major Linux distributions these day.
     
  21. summerheat

    summerheat Registered Member

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    I couldn't agree more. Everything a user isn't familiar with looks difficult at first.
     
  22. summerheat

    summerheat Registered Member

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    That's hardly possible as this depends on which distro you're using and what your needs are. In most distros a newbie doesn't have to access the console normally as most things can be done via a helper application in the respective desktop environment. I have friends (and my wife) using Kubuntu who don't know that the console even exists. ;) So you can take your time to gradually learn what you need. If you're planning, e.g., to write your own bash scripts in order to automate some tasks or whatever you have to dig a bit deeper. But for a newbie that's hardly necessary. Learning by doing is the secret :cool:

    And by the way: Although I've been using Linux for many years I frequently stumble upon commands and/or tricks I hadn't been aware of before. And you know what? This didn't stop me using Linux all the time.
     
  23. Stupendous Man

    Stupendous Man Registered Member

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    True.
    However, in Kubuntu, there were a few things for which I had to use the command line, for which I think a GUI option should be available.
    LibreOffice offers a lot of extensions in its Extension and Templates Repository, but for installing Dutch spellchecker hunspell-nl I had to use the command line. Also, I had to use the command line to install libdvdcss to be able to play encrypted DVDs. And I had to use the command line for the fix for "cdrecord has no permission to open the device" in K3b.
    I think those things are too basic to justify the need to use the command line.
     
  24. longshots

    longshots Registered Member

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    This is a recurring reason and it can not be dismissed - there is no [business friendly] Linux alternative.
    And when they've finished tinkering and decide to go for a drive, it's not the smooth auto of Windows but a six gear box with a dodgy clutch.

    Nevertheless, and notwithstanding all of the above, I am very happy with my current Ubuntu Mate setup. After trying about 7 of the 83 Linux variations available, I found Ubuntu Mate to be the easiest to use, and the closest to a Windows setup that I could find. I still have W10 on my laptop but am using it very sparingly these days.

    And finally, @Circuit, I'm 70 this year so "too old" is not going to cut it here.
     
  25. Iangh

    Iangh Registered Member

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    My wife doesn't use the command-line because I set it up for her. BTW, I'd love to know of an app to auto-mount network shares. I think there's a big difference between using and setting up, or should I say gap. One is a lot easier than the other. It's making it as easy as possible for the house techy to 'do' Linux, where the house techy is the recognised PC support person in the house, the setter-upper. I think I'm quite techy and it took me a while to get used to Linux command-line. I believe the 2% could be a lot higher with more attention given to teaching the command-line. I agree, once it's set-up for somebody it's dead-easy and I find Kubuntu a lot more pleasurable experience than Win10.

    As to a 5-pager, I looked at what I did in Windows and then set out to replicate it in Kubuntu. Issues I discovered over time we're:
    Network drive auto-mounting;
    Taking ownership;
    Using sudo to remove;
    Using sudo nano to edit.
    If an expert did a 5-pager on command-line stuff you need to know when moving from Windows to Kubuntu that would be brilliant. Somebody else could customise it to another distro.
     
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