what makes a curse word

Discussion in 'ten-forward' started by cheater87, Nov 29, 2005.

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  1. cheater87

    cheater87 Registered Member

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    what makes a word bad to say?
     
  2. Rico

    Rico Registered Member

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    How About

    Abusive, vulgar, or irreverent language.
     
  3. beetlejuice

    beetlejuice Registered Member

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    The word "work" is the worst 4 letter curse word I know of. ;)
     
  4. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    As a foreigner, I don't feel English words like I do in Dutch. All English words are the same for me.
    In Dutch we also have dirty words of course, but they aren't always vulgar.
    In English I can't make that distinction, that's why I avoid dirty words as much as possible.
     
  5. Primrose

    Primrose Registered Member

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    Whether you hit your finger with a hammer..or post some of those words at Wilders.. you usually know soon enough.;)
     

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  6. big ed

    big ed Registered Member

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    How in the &%*$*@#*%$#@ do I know?

    Oxymoroning in Oxford, Oy ed
     
  7. Firecat

    Firecat Registered Member

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    A word is bad to say when it causes negative effects on a wide variety of people. ;)
     
  8. big ed

    big ed Registered Member

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    How about if I called Bucky a bad word (not that I ever would)? How many people would that affect?

    Just wondering, Uh ed
     
  9. AnthonyG

    AnthonyG Registered Member

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    A teacher once explained this to me in school (im now 25 so this shows how long ago it was) it was about 13-14 years ago so my memory of what was said is a bit hazy.

    But what makes a curse word in the english language is. It is apparently words that were used and part of the Anglo Saxon language. And when the Romans came over and conquered us (England) they forced us to use their language. So it was deemed highly offensive and taboo to use the old AngloSaxon language at this time.

    Hence the word offesive language.

    If this is true i really wish the Romans had the F-Word in their language as i personally find it the most indespensibe word in the english language that can be used as a verb, noun or for what i use it for. As a word to place empisis pr urgency on the word following it or the statement being said.

    Can some historians please say if this is correct as i have always been curious if it were true or not (it was my Geography teacher which told the class this so therefore i took it with a pinch of salt).
     
  10. Cochise

    Cochise A missed friend

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    Mmmmmmm!....."What makes a curse word"........It's just a guess here but I would assume.........anything you can clue together using letters from the Alphabet.......that sound rude......or very naughty....


    Cochise,:cool: Kursing in Kutsk...
     
  11. MikeBCda

    MikeBCda Registered Member

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    My late mom had an interesting theory about a link between profanity and the rise in street violence. Never heard this from any sociologists, professional or wannabe, but it sure makes sense.

    Back when I was growing up, in our house there were degrees of profanity. Drat and heck were relatively safe anytime, anywhere. Damn and s--t were much stronger, and reserved for extreme provocation (preferably under your breath).

    And the f-word was the ultimate, right off the scale. I heard my mother use it only once in my life.

    She noted the increase in the number of "street kids" (and others) using the f-word every third or fourth word, with no emotional content at all. And her theory was that when they got really angry, they'd already run out of words for their anger and had nowhere to go but to get physical.
     
  12. Cochise

    Cochise A missed friend

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    Makes sense to me Mike......


    Cochise,:cool:
     
  13. AnthonyG

    AnthonyG Registered Member

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    Well theres also the C-Word that i use for rare occasions of severe annoyance.
    That is usually deemed as the ultimate curse word that is still banned to this day from ever being said on british terestrial television. Notice the F-Word is basically said in everyother program and film but this is always still cut out of movies when being shown on TV in the uk. (if it is ever said).
     
  14. Marja

    Marja Honestly, I'm not a bot!!

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    I like your mom's take, Mike! Makes sense to me too.........

    ANY word - depending on how you use it- can be offensive to someone, try to think before ya say it........try'n that myself:rolleyes: :D

    People have insulted their counterparts for eons, without 'cursing' as we know it! Some are pretty funny to us, but, not to the people who use them.......

    Gonna have to find some and post them, bet Primmy can find tons!! :D;)




     
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