What is the correct way to make a restore?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by jon1, Sep 1, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jon1

    jon1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Posts:
    42
    Hello.
    I am using Acronis True Image 10 build 4942.
    I hope someone can help me with a very simple question.
    What is the correct way to make a restore?
    1. Take backup of partition1.
    2. Restore to partition2.


    I was surprised to see most of my programs destroyed on partition1 because of a simple restore running from windows on partition1.
    The restore to another partition destroyed the original.
    I could not reinstall Acronis True Image because of boot problems, but had to start from scratch.

    I cannot use Rescue CD but I have a BartCD which works.
     
  2. Tabvla

    Tabvla Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Posts:
    649
    Location:
    London, England
    Hi Jon

    The important thing to understand is the Backup.

    In simple terms there are 2 types of backups: -

    1. A backup of the Files and Folders. This type of backup can be done with almost any backup utility, including the Backup that comes with Windows. One can think of this type of backup as being similar to "Copying" a group of files and folders and then compressing them with WinZip. This type of backup is suitable for data files such as documents; music; photos.... etc.

    2. A sector by sector Disk (or Partition) Image. For this type of backup you need a program like Acronis True Image. This type of backup is what you need to backup your Operating System and Programs. (If you make a Files and Folders backup of your OS you will not be able to Restore it in such a way as to create a bootable disk/partition).

    There is always an element of risk if you restore a backup back to its original location. For example, if you restore an Image backup of the OS to the boot partition the first thing that happens is that the backup process clears out the partition in preparation for reinstating the OS. If the restore goes wrong you will then be left with an unbootable system.

    If you provide some more information about your system and at what state it is currently in then we may be able to provide you with some guidelines as to how you can fix it.

    Hope that this helps.

    T.
     
  3. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Posts:
    2,295
    Location:
    Cromwell Country
    Jon1 - when you restore an image to a drive or partition the first thing it does is to destroy/delete the drive or partition.

    so if you have problem with your c: drive or partition and want to restore a good image the answer is you restore to partition 1. restoring will destroy C: and replace it with the good image
     
  4. jon1

    jon1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Posts:
    42
    Thank you both for the answers.
    What I was really wondering about is what is the best way to restore a partition backup to another partition.
    The question has come up because I have noticed that True Image is able to make a mess of it. I think the real problem lies in that there is not enough choice of parameters during a partition restore.
    It sounds so simple, but to me this has been a very difficult task.
    Thanks.
     
  5. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Posts:
    2,295
    Location:
    Cromwell Country
    jon1 - I have read a lot about problems and making and restoring images but have only ever had one restore problem ( caused by a bad USB cable).

    when I started with Acronis 6 I fortunately hadn't read about all the problems so I simply made an image and then made some changes to C: and restored it as a test - no problem.

    Today if the last image failed I would simply restore the one made before that and if that one failed the one made before that.

    As a test you could always restore to any other partition - but if it is C: you are restoring you will still not really know that it works because you will not be able to boot.

    Eventually you will either have to restore to C: or get another drive the same as you are using and restore to that.

    If your operation system may be in need of a reformat and re-install then I would say - back you your data and then restore C: to C: - the odds are very much that it will work. If it fails then go ahead and re-install your system.

    Even if it works you should re-install and get a nice clean system and then make an image. You will then never need to reinstall again.

    good luck
     
  6. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Posts:
    2,405
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    It is when the partition being restored (into a different partition locations) is a OS system partition that the trouble arises.

    If you restore C overtop C or D overtop D, etc. this type restore usually works. Likewise, if the partition contains all data, then both Windows and Acronis have no difficulty when this is restored into a new partition location. Usually, when restoring a full disk (all partitions being restored), this type restore works very well.

    Dual booting system seem to have lots of difficulty when partition is changed.
     
  7. jon1

    jon1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Posts:
    42
    Thanks Long View and GroverH.
    That was good info and confirms that there is a problem with system partition restore to another location.
    GroverH – I am impressed by your work and willingness to make others clever.
    I will study your guides and links deeply.
    You have given me all the information I need.
    Thanks.
     
  8. alexmelo

    alexmelo Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Posts:
    12
    Hi,
    I'd like to elaborate a little bit on this question posed by Jon1, in what concerns MBR and Track 0.
    I am also confused with restore using ATI 10. (I have Vista). My idea of purchasing ATI 10 is to make periodical backups of C:, thinking of possible problems after installing a software, etc., then returning to a previous good situation. I don't want/need to backup all partitions of my HD. Just my good C:, today, which might become bad after some problems. When you backup, you can just choose C: only (not Disk 1). However, when you begin the restore wizard of that image you made of C:, you have the option of C: PLUS MBR AND TRACK 0. First question is: Why do MBR and Track 0 appear in the restore wizard ?
    You have to select one or the other, not both simultaneously. A few days ago I did one restore of C:, just selecting C:, and over C:, which required me to do a repair of Vista, which scared me, and now I'm insecure to do any restore, and already thinking to buy another backup software and abandon ATI 10.
    The second question is, I really don't know if I have to select C: AND MBR and Track 0 (however, both can not be selected at the same time), or only C:. (Or what, eventually)? The ATI 10 manual just says in a language that is not for the usual computer user: "Disk and partition images contain a copy of track 0 along with MBR. It appears in this window in a separate line. You can choose whether to restore MBR and track 0 by checking the respective box. Restore MBR if it is critical to your system to boot". (o_O) This is alien language to me, unfortunately. (I have a friend who uses Acronis 8 with Windows XP and this option of MBR and track 0 does not appear when restoring C: to C: and everything works for him. I'd be very grateful for any help. Thanks, Alexandre.
     
  9. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Posts:
    2,591
    Location:
    State College, Pennsylvania
    If you first select one of the choices, then continue along with the restore wizard, you will eventually be asked if you want to select any more partitions to restore. Then you can select the other choice. This will allow you to restore both simultaneously.
    That was a one-time issue. The next time that you restore your C partition this won't happen again. The reason that it happened is that TI moved the starting sector of the partition slightly when restoring, to conform with what has been the standard for many years now. Moving the partition causes the Vista bootloader to lose track of the location of the starting sector of Vista. Running the Vista repair operation from the DVD fixes the bootloader. There is more information in this very long thread if you like technical details.
    If you're only running Windows then you will probably never need to restore track 0 and the MBR. TrueImage will create a standard Master Boot Record (MBR) if needed. You made a correct choice when you restored only the C partition.

    This option is there for people who run Linux, or use a boot manager to boot into multiple operating systems. It enables them to restore their boot manager if it gets damaged or replaced. Simply running a Microsoft repair product (fixmbr on XP or doing a Vista repair with the DVD) will overwrite third-party bootloaders and replace them with Microsoft's bootloader. Restoring track 0 will restore the original bootloader.

    Again, if you only run Vista then you won't need to use this feature.
     
  10. alexmelo

    alexmelo Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Posts:
    12
    K0lo,
    Thanks a lot. Very concise and clear explanations. Regards, Alexandre
     
  11. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Posts:
    2,405
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Alexandre & Jon1:

    In addition to the excellent info by Mark
    Should you have a drive failure and need to replace the drive via an imaging restore, usually your best results and fewest problems are when you are working from a full disk archive where the "Disk" option was tick marked and this type backup includes all partition--both hidden and diagnostic.

    Some of the more knowledgeable forum members can find ways of restoring a single partition (system) backup to other partitions thru a variety of special procedures but for the normal user, restoring the full disk usually works the easiest. That's why I always suggest that the user make and retain a full disk backup where all partitions are ticked(disk option ticked). If you do backups weekly, then maybe once each month, tick mark the "disk" option. Backing up individual partitons can be part of a backup routine--just include the full backup option (disk ticked) as part of that routine.
     
  12. jon1

    jon1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Posts:
    42
    How to restore a system partition to a different partition.
    Moved to new thread.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2007
  13. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Posts:
    8,634
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    jon1,

    What is your plan? Do you want two WinXP partitions on the one HD?
     
  14. jon1

    jon1 Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Posts:
    42
    Yes, that's correct and more than just two.
    Thanks.
     
  15. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Posts:
    8,634
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.