w7 many services,which did you shut down?

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by mantra, May 9, 2010.

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  1. mantra

    mantra Registered Member

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    Hi
    w7 has a lot of services
    which did you shut down or set manual
    in the task manager there are a lot active(running)

    i used pserv2 to edit my services and it's cool because can save profiles, so it's easy to load defautl and so on

    it's free -> http://www.p-nand-q.com/download/pserv_cpl.html

    would like to share with you your advises and feedbacks

    thanks
     
  2. lodore

    lodore Registered Member

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    Windows 7 has less services running than in vista due to trigger services being implemented. services should run only when needed.
    I haven't bothered adjusting any standard services. if you have an nvidia graphics card and dont have a 3D monitor who does ?? then you may want to remove the drivers for it. it has its own entrie in add/remove programs only takes around 5 seconds to remove and gets rid of that service.
    part one
    part two
    I hope more and more software makes use of trigger services.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2010
  3. mantra

    mantra Registered Member

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    thanks
    i compared to my xp
     
  4. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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  5. Escalader

    Escalader Registered Member

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    W7 is quite different services wise than xp sp3.

    I used the blackviper web site as the source and first did his safe settings then a few of the tweaked setting that seem to be a fit for my set up.

    Excluding 3rd party appliications I have about 48 windows 7 services running.

    On my xp sp3 I have 24 services active.
     
  6. adik1337

    adik1337 Registered Member

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    you can use windows 7 manager to tweak windows 7 services running on your pc ... after using it I only have 39 services running including third party services. It will all boil down to your own needs though.
     
  7. mantra

    mantra Registered Member

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  8. mantra

    mantra Registered Member

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    thanks
    do you mean
    is task manager?

    by the way the freeware i posted is really great and can export and import settings ,it's really useful
     
  9. mantra

    mantra Registered Member

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    i used the blackviper too
    but i did not find w7 more light , i mean with the safe setting it consuming the same ammount of ram
     
  10. adik1337

    adik1337 Registered Member

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    nope not win task manager ... this one http://www.yamicsoft.com/windows7manager/ ... it's not a freeware though. Shoot me a PM if you want this app.
     
  11. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    Unlike with XP, I don't bother shutting down services in Win 7. I had a look at doing this a while back but just can't justify bothering with the few candidates I found.
     
  12. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    I can't justify messing with it in 7 either. There is really nothing to be gained.
     
  13. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    I feel it is a mixed bag with 7. Some services, I just don't need. Anything to do with indexing and searching, I turn off. I know where my things are, and I rarely search anyway. IMO these types of services are using resources, cpu/ram/disk. Shutting them down provides a neglible "feel" of difference, but can be perceptible, for me mostly on disk accesses.

    I like the fact that many services are capable of remaingin in "neutral" until needed, but not all do that.

    I can't say that I would be able to notice many of the service tweaks if I weren't specifically looking for the differences. To the untrained eye or casual user, I agree that there is probably not much difference.

    When you have sufficient ram, I think the old school mentality of "I need to conserve that ram for other things than stupid services" is hard to drop. Having kept a close watch on my memory for about the whole time I have been using windows, it used to be imperitive that you shaved it off for max performance. Since I have had 2gb + in my last few rigs, and now being at 4gb, it is just a stigma that the OS should not need to use all those resources if it is doing nothing but browsing.

    But today, browsers consume 100+ mb of ram, the OS consumes 1gb, a game will consume 1+gb likley. It still leaves memory left over. So, if you have the memory, what is the drawback to it being used? More and more from daily use, I don't see it as much of a problem.

    I believe then that the services tweaking in 7 is not as critical as it used to be in the older versions. But that does not mean that you can't gain by doing it, or that you won't learn a little something along the way. After all, how many times has an issue been resolved by a mis-behaving service that you "just happened to know about because you were messing with them"?

    Sul.
     
  14. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    Yep.
    I tested in either vmWare or put them onto the live box and then did a macrium restore after playing.

    You could back your registry up then restore it, but I found the other 2 ways easier.

    I also used SD a bit, but anything needing a reboot really cripples that method. On some of them you can log off then log on, or just restart explorer.exe. But some you have to reboot.

    But, when I setup a new OS, I plan on reinstalling/imaging/whatever many many times until I get down what I want in the way that I want. I am still not finished with 7, perhaps at about 60%. My real job and other events in life have slowed that to a crawl. But one day this year hopefully, I will have it tuned exactly the way I want it, and have .reg or .bat or .whatever files to set it that way from a fresh install. So to me, the time invested should pay for itself. On XP, I used the same setup after the first year or two, just modifying a bit here and there. The work paid for itself many times over.

    Sul.
     
  15. doktornotor

    doktornotor Registered Member

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    Errr... Indexing ain't even installed by default w/ W7. o_O
     
  16. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    I am on xp here at work, so don't have it to see. What do they call that, the little box when you press the start button? You type in it, it finds things all over? It is not the run box, which is what I always use, something else. Whatever that is, you can turn it off. With it on, when you open a disk in explorer, the bar on the top has to "look" before you can start accessing it. If you turn those services off, you don't have to wait like that. But it does make that little box operate differently, or even get removed if you desire.

    Sul.
     
  17. doktornotor

    doktornotor Registered Member

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  18. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    Right, the old XP indexing engine has been replaced by one that cannot be turned off. This was a part of the controversy over Microsoft's "consultations" with the NSA and other privacy group concerns. It's not that Win7 doesn't index - it most certainly does and runs with the same service as "Windows Search" itself.

    Even the page you linked to clearly states this:

    Windows Search Service

    The main component of Windows Search is the indexer process, which is implemented as a Windows service running in the LocalSystem account. The process is always running for all users (even if no user is logged in), enabling Windows Search to maintain one index that is shared among all users, and with security restrictions on content access and to process remote queries from client computers on the network.

    The Search service is designed to protect the user experience and system performance when indexing. The following conditions cause the service to throttle back or pause indexing:

    * High CPU usage by non-search-related processes
    * High system I/O rate including file reads and writes, page file and file cache I/O, and mapped file I/O
    * Low memory availability
    * Low battery life
    * Low disk space on the drive that stores the index


    Edit: I also didn't mention that Microsoft claims the new Windows Search is better for privacy. Their own pitch for it goes like this:

    Windows Search is designed to protect your and your company's sensitive data and personal information while helping you to find exactly what you need from your e-mail messages, files on your PC, shared resources, intranet shares, or the Web. Windows Search respects security permissions and does not display results for content that cannot be accessed by the user. This functionality helps ensure privacy, compliance, and protection of intellectual property (IP). In addition, user-identifiable information is never sent to Microsoft or to any third party.

    I bolded the portion (a single word) that Microsoft has failed to address. Not displaying something and not having access to it, if necessary, are two very different things.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2010
  19. lodore

    lodore Registered Member

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    Hey LockBox,
    you can stop windows search,
    start,control panel,programs turn on and off windows features untick windows search and click on ok.
     
  20. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    Hi lodore. You can start and stop the service from searching and displaying, "pausing" they call it when speaking technically. The indexing from the service is always running (the last I heard from EFF). Oh, go back and read my edited post.
     
  21. doktornotor

    doktornotor Registered Member

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    Ah... right. My participation in this debate is over. I thought this is supposed to be a technical debate and not a manifestation of paranoia attack. I'd suggest seeking medical help.
     
  22. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    No, no, no. This isn't the old "NSA Key" conspiracy crap. It is a FACT that Microsoft had "consultations" with the NSA. They have admiited that calling it only a general briefing or some such thing. I don't think there is a backdoor, but the possibility of indexing everything on a hard drive could very well been up for discussion. I'm not a conspiracy nut.
     
  23. doktornotor

    doktornotor Registered Member

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    Yeah, really...

    [​IMG]
     
  24. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    doktornotor, You can at least admit your post was misleading. The "old" indexing service is gone. You discussed that without mentioning it had simply been replaced by a bigger and better indexing engine.
     
  25. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    Why the need for the snarky attitude? It is immature and you go too much further and it becomes something Wilders doesn't put up with.
     
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