Very Basic Question From Newby

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by rlrood, Feb 28, 2008.

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  1. rlrood

    rlrood Registered Member

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    I'm running ATI, version 11.

    I've created an initial full backup of C-drive.

    It is approx. 275GB.

    The backup is an external 500GB one.

    Question: Can I now create a full backup of C-drive without FIRST deleting the existing one?

    I know that I can create differential, incremental (whatever) backups, but that is not what I want to do.

    If I am coming across as a bit frustrated it is because I am. I can not find specific information on my question in the 120 plus manual (although I expect it might be there), nor do any of the posts I've read answer the question.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    Do the math ... if the first backup is 275GB, is there enough space for another file of 275Gb on a 500Gb drive? The answer is no ... unless you have removed a whole bunch of files from the C drive.
     
  3. TheWeaz

    TheWeaz Registered Member

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    “Question: Can I now create a full backup of C-drive without FIRST deleting the existing one?”
    Depends on what you really want to do. If you no longer want the first backup, just run the task with the same backup image name and it will write over the first. You’ll be left with one backup image.
     
  4. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    I'm not sure I'm understanding your question.
    If you're asking whether you can restore your TrueImage backup file of your C drive overtop the existing C drive, the answer is Yes. No pre-deletion necessary.

    If you asking if you can two files the same name, the answer is no. The new file will overwrite the old file. Perhaps my guides listed below can help further.

    FYI: In you have other partitions on your system drive (either hidden or diagnostic), then your partition backup of only the C drive is NOT sufficient (for most) to restore you to a working system should your need to restore your system. In order to easily recovery your system should you have a disk failure, you need a "disk" option backup (which includes all partitions on the same disk) in order to fully recover your system. The existence of partitions can be viewed in the XP Disk Management feature. Your current backup would be considered a single partition backup rather than a Disk option backup.

    For those with large backup files, some consider have another identical hard drive(s) stored away for security. Especially if images or audio files are heavily involved.

    Hopefully, you are not confusing cloning and imaging. A miscellaneous extract below about cloning & imaging.
    ----------------------------------------------------
    Cloning/Imaging Terminology
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=170693

    Clone Disk - migrates/copies the entire contents of one disk drive to another (e.g. install a larger disk) to achieve two identical drives with the same file structure . During the cloning process you are presented with a choice what to do with the old drive - keep it as it is, or erase.

    Backup - (Imaging) creates a special archive file for backup and disaster recovery purposes--which also includes new drive replacement. Archive file can be created within Windows mode or from Acronis bootable Rescue CD.

    If interested in backing up your hard drive for the disaster recovery purposes, the Backup approach is recommended. Moreover, there are several advantages of creating an image over the disk cloning procedure such as: you can create an image without rebooting your PC, image creation can be scheduled for the particular point in time, Acronis True Image allows you to create incremental and differential images, image archive contains only the actual data and so it has a smaller size, images are ordinary files and so they can be stored on any type of the supported media, etc. However, the final choice is always up to your needs.

    Please take a look at this FAQ article explaining the difference between Clone Disk and Backup approaches in more detail. Read carefully plus check the User guide if you plan to use this feature. It has both risks and benefits!

    You can find the detailed instructions on how to use Acronis True Image 10.0 Home in the respective
    User's Guide.

    If interested in backing up your hard drive for the disaster recovery purposes, the Backup approach is recommended. Moreover, there are several advantages of creating an image over the disk cloning procedure such as: you can create an image without rebooting your PC, image creation can be scheduled for the particular point in time, Acronis True Image allows you to create incremental and differential images, image archive contains only the actual data and so it has a smaller size, images are ordinary files and so they can be stored on any type of the supported media, etc. However, the final choice is always up to your needs.
    ----------------------

    Cloning/Imaging Terminolog by seekforever
    A clone is just like making a biological clone of sheep. You run the clone function and it makes a second disk look just like the first disk. The partition layout and files are all copied to the new disk so you have 2 disks that are identical. Since you have 2 disks you could consider one a backup in case the other failed but the real intent of the clone function is to use it when you get a new HD. You clone the old onto the new and then run from your new disk. Since newer disks are often bigger than older disks TI gives you various options in the cloning procedure to adjust partitions to make use of the extra space on the new drive.

    An image is intended to be used to make a backup of your bootable OS partition or any other partition. The contents of the source disk (the one being imaged) are read and compressed (if desired) and written into an archive file on the destination device. The destination device can be an internal HD, external HD, CD, DVD or tape. Since the image only contains the sectors that were actually used it is smaller than the HD unless it was totally full and is made even smaller if compressed. For this reason, depending on the size of your destination device you can store various numbers of images on it.

    The smallest unit an image can backup is a partition so you can make images of a partition, several partitions or all of the partitions on the whole disk. When you restore an image of a bootable partition the device will be bootable.

    There are lots of options that can be selected when making an image like compression amount, split-size so you can make the pieces the correct size to fit onto a CD or DVD or maybe you just like dealing with smaller files. An image of a half-full 250GB disk depending on the types of files on it could result in a single 200GB file!

    You can also have your image validated when you create it. Validating does not compare the data in the image with the data on the disk because if you make the disk while within Windows it is continuously changing. TI calculates a checksum or perhaps several as the archive file is created and includes them with the file. When you validate an image file it reads the archive and recalculates the checksum(s) and compares them with the stored value. If they don't agree perfectly the archive is declared corrupt. The amount of data being processed is typically several to tens of gigabytes and all you need is for one bad bit to happen to have archive declared corrupt and useless so it is imperative your hardware be in top shape.

    You can use the TI Mount command to mount an image. It gets mounted as if it were another disk on your PC and you can use Explorer to copy files out of the image. This is handy to retrieve one or a few files without needing to restore the whole image.

    Images do not use the OS's file system so they can run very fast. The other kind of backup which is intended for data files is the Files and Folders (FF)backup. It will NOT give you a bootable disk if you use it to restore your files. It uses the OS's file system and is thus slower.


    What is the difference between creating an image with Acronis True Image 10 Home and using the embedded "Disk Clone" tool?
    The "Backup" wizard of Acronis True Image 10 Home creates an image file for backup and disaster recovery purposes, while the "Disk Clone" tool simply copies/moves the entire contents of one hard disk drive to another. Here's how both tools work and when you should use them.

    When you create an image with Acronis True Image 10 Home, you get an exact copy of your hard disk, a disk partition or individual files or folders (you make this choice when you create the image archive). If you choose to back up a hard disk drive or a partition, then every portion of the hard disk that has data written to it (sectors) is saved into a compressed file — or multiple files if you prefer. You can save this image to any supported storage device and use it as a backup or for disaster recovery. (Note: if Acronis True Image cannot identify the file system, it creates a sector-by-sector image of the disk. This image is not compressed and the image file will be the same size as the disk being imaged.)

    When you use the "Disk Clone" tool, you effectively copy/move all of the contents of one hard disk drive onto another hard disk drive. This function allows you to transfer all the information (including the operating system and installed programs) from a small hard disk drive to a large one without having to reinstall and reconfigure all of your software. The migration takes minutes, not hours, but it is not generally used as a backup strategy.
     
  5. rlrood

    rlrood Registered Member

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    DwnNdrty,

    Thanks for your reply. I had asked a similiar question in another thread and I believe you responded pretty much the same, "Do the math."

    I had done the math when I started this thread.

    That is why I'm asking the question which is: Do I have to delete the existing backup before creating another backup?

    Thanks.
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  6. rlrood

    rlrood Registered Member

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    TheWeaz,

    Thanks for your reply.

    Just read your reply and I should have mentioned it in my reply to "DwnNdrty," since he said that I can NOT create another full backup unless I delete the existing one and you say that in the process of creating the new one it will delete the existing one -- which is fine with me.

    The reason for my very simple question is that having read some of the 120 plus pages of the ATI manual and also having read some of the threads on this forum, I'm a bit confused. Frankly, I bought ATI for the single purpose of backing up the data on my computer. I also thought it would be good to backup the entire C-drive, but now I'm not so sure.

    So...my simple question is merely a starting point to understanding how ATI works. I really hope that I do not have to continue to ask questions of this forum to be able to backup data, but if I do I will be most thankful for the information anyone provides:)

    At this point, I'm about to uninstall Acronis and move to something that might be simpler. The hard drive I'm using for backup comes with backup software that only has a 42 page manual, and can be understood!

    Again, thanks for your reply.
    _________________________________________________________________

     
  7. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Have you looked at my guides listed below. They will do what you want to do.

    You need a full Disk option backup (which includes all partitions). That type of a backup will get you out of trouble when disaster strikes. If you have the time, give them a read. I believe you will find them helpful.
    Grover
     
  8. TheWeaz

    TheWeaz Registered Member

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    IMHO – TI was a great product for doing disk imaging. Then the bells and whistles started to get added. As far as I’m concerned, that’s when it all started going down hill.
    For what you want to do, I think TI is a good choice.
    If you schedule a task to create an image and give the image file a name of MYJUNK1, each time you run it, it will overwrite the previous image file (named MYJUNK1). So with a 500GB drive as your target, you can run the backup (275GB) as often as you like without deleting anything. I have 7GB of free space on a backup drive and I create a 14GB image file everyday without deleting anything. If you want to keep more than one backup, then of course you have a problem since two 275GB files will not fit on a 500GB drive.
     
  9. rlrood

    rlrood Registered Member

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    Thanks Grover,

    Yes, I read your reply and looked at the guides, and will look at them again.

    I realize that ATI has many features and a lot of capability, haven't decided exactly how much of it I will use.

    My question was posed so that I can proceed with a basic level of protection for the large amount of data I have accumulated. It seemed such a simple question, but I suppose I should have spent more time writing it. What I would like to do is create a full backup that replaces the one I already have without manually deleting the existing one first, and I still do not know if that can be done. One reply says no and the other says yes.

    Frankly, what really bothers me bout ATI are the numerous threads on this really good forum in which so many folks seem to have problems in backing up and restoring data. It shouldn't be that difficult. It reminds me of Pinnacle Studio video editing software which I use. It is generally considered to be the most full-featured software, with a very good user interface, among the various consumer level software packages (except for Apple software), but it is so full of bugs that it frequently does not work. You wouldn't believe the complaints on their forum -- reminds me of what I'm reading on this forum. Hope that remark doesn't get me thrown off what seems like a very good forum.

    I do not want to be a "frequent poster" to this forum, I'm very involved in a lot of photography projects and time spent in learning to use backup software detracts from that. I know, it will protect your data, and I believe that, but it shouldn't be so hard, and require that one spend significant amount of time on a forum to learn how to use it.

    Again, thanks for the information you provided and I will use it.
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  10. rlrood

    rlrood Registered Member

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    Thanks, for some reason I didn't see your post. Your answer is exactly what I am looking for.
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  11. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    rlrood,

    Just a couple thought which may or may not relate. I'm not assuming anything but thought I might mention a couple items.

    I am aware that many photographers make a practice of having multiple internal and external drives so they always have themselves protected should a tragedy occur.

    Many of us would strongly discourage your cancellation of a good backup prior to the creation of another good working backup; unless, you have backups other than the one being discussed on the external 500G drive. Backup files do get corrupted. Hard drives are damaged. Computers are ruint via power surges, etc. Sometimes, a problem with a backup file is not discovered until much later. Real protection has to include more than one single backup.

    If much of the data currently stored on your Drive C is static data, perhaps much of it could be moved to other drives--either internal or external or both; and even copies onto DVD. A smaller C drive would enable additional backups could be stored on the 500G. Transfer of data is faster via internal drives but external drives are considered safer in that they can be disconnected when not in actual use.

    You probably already have these bases covered but I thought they might be worth mentioning.

    If you have some extra time, the links below might be interesting reading.

    Recommend backup scheme for photos, music 32 replies--2 pages
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=164175

    SAVE MY MUSIC COLLECTION! PLEASE (29 replies --2 pages)
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=167710
     
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