Used Acronis for larger hard drive, now have a problem

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Rooster5488, Jul 26, 2009.

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  1. Rooster5488

    Rooster5488 Registered Member

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    I purchased Acronis True Image Home 2009 so that I could image my laptops 80GB hard drive and move the image to a larger hard drive. I'm out of room with all my Autodesk applications.

    Found a few useful pdfs from this forum, but none seemed to be the 2009 application.

    After a couple of unsuccessful attempts to move image to a new 320GB hard drive. Did get the C: partition to 280GB the E: recovery partition was to be 7.318GB, the image had it at 6.665GB so thought the slightly larger would be the right thing to do.

    Now when I turn on the computer the first thing that comes up on the screen is Warning: A partition overlays you system recovery partition. Press F10 to start the sytem recovery anyway or another key to delete the recovery partition.

    When I go to My Computer and right click for properties on the E: partition it tells me that my Free Space is 0 Bytes and my Used Space is 0 bytes.

    Can someone help me determine what, if anything, I did wrong?

    Thanks,

    Rooster5488
     
  2. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    A few things to try .... when you do the recovery process, choose the partitions seperately so that you can resize them to what you want. Make the E (recovery partition) part the exact size as the original.

    Most systems with a maker's recovery partition have the feature to make your own Factory recovery cds. If yours does, make the CDs (or DVDs) and then blow away the partition on the hard drive - recover the C partition only and expand it to the entire drive.
     
  3. jef3680

    jef3680 Registered Member

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    I have a 750 GB drive in my desktop and was planning to install a second 1 TB drive to use as a backup drive. Will this pose a problem for me? My current drive has two partitions one large one for the OS, program and data and a small one for recovery. I am planning to upgrade from Vista to Win7 and at that time I was going to partition my 750 GB drive with two partition and use one partition for OS and Programs and the second Partition for data. I then would duplicate that on my 1TB backup drive. Is this the best way to do this?
     
  4. Rooster5488

    Rooster5488 Registered Member

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    So DwnDrty,

    Then I should put my orginal, much smaller, hard drive back in the laptop and see if HP provides me the means to back up the small E: Recovery partition onto CDs or DVDs?

    Guess what someone like me doesn't understand...what is this for? Do I need it with an Acronis True Image back-up?

    Might I be better to move start-up drive order to have a USB port second or third and put the E: Recovery partition info on a jump drive?

    To futher enlarge the C: partition on the new drive, do I then need to re-image the new larger hard drive and just use a 100% C partition?

    Thanks so much for the help, I really appreciate it!

    Rooster
     
  5. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    The Factory Recovery CDs (or DVDs) will allow you to put the laptop back to Factory condition i.e. just like when you first bought it.

    Moving the boot order so the USB drive is second will not serve any purpose since Windows will not boot from a usb drive.

    After you've made the Factory Cds, re-do the Recovery process to the larger drive and expand the partition to the entire drive.
     
  6. Rooster5488

    Rooster5488 Registered Member

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    OK, so I'm trying to figure out how to back up my new larger hard drive. My back-ups are on a Maxtor external USB hard drive. But for some reason now, when I start Acronis True Image...and select to do a back-up...the only drive that shows up is my Maxtor external hard drive, letter F:. If I go to My Computer, there is my new 280GB C: drive, but for some reason I can't get Acronis to recognize it so that I can back it up and then restore without the E: partition.

    Suggestions on what we may have wrong here?

    Thanks,

    Rooster5488
     
  7. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    Something isn't adding up here ... try the process with the bootable Rescue CD. Usually it is the other way around where the external isn't seen. What make of laptop is this?
     
  8. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Rooster5488

    Is there any possibility that you might temporarily reattach the old drive and post a picture attachment of the screen as displayed when you access your Windows Disk Management option.

    Your problem with the new drive not being drive C is probably because you first booted with both drives attached following the restore.

    If you have some time, I believe you could benefit by reading the guides listed in line 2 and 3 of my signature below. These guides were written for V9-10-11 but the procedure also relate to the newer ATI 2009.

    As it appears to me, it appears your best chance of suggest would be to start over from the beginning. After we see your attachment posting, additional suggestions can be offered by us all.

    If you need help accessing the Disk Management function and using XP, you could create a shortcut on your desktop and post this command into the shortcut
    %windir%\system32\diskmgmt.msc

    This is a sample image of what is expected.
    Disk Management Attachment
    [​IMG]

    Attachment guides.
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=189549
     
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