USB Boot

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by krockroc, Sep 4, 2008.

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  1. krockroc

    krockroc Registered Member

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    Hi,

    Help please.....

    I restored an Acronis TrueImage backup of a WIn2003 Server to a PC with two internal hard-drives (one of which had XP Pro). Changed the boot priority to use the restored 2003 drive and the PC booted up perfectly. Great!

    Then I wanted to see if I could restore the same image to an external USB drive and boot from my Vista Business laptop. I changed the boot option on my laptop to boot from USB. The Win2003 splash screen appears but then it blue screens. I tried a bunch of stuff with boot.ini and the other system files (can't remember all their names.....hal.dll, ntdoskrnl, ntdlr etc....) but no joy. Has anyone ever done something like this?

    The main difference I see is that, in the working version, the two drives are Master and Slave (can be seen in Acronis). Whereas the USB version has the laptop as Master but the USB is not a slave (visible and I could restore to it, but not a slave). Is 'slave' vital?

    Any ideas,

    Thanks.
     
  2. Earthling

    Earthling Registered Member

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    Windows is unable to boot from USB drives. That's intentional. but don't ask me why.
     
  3. bodgy

    bodgy Registered Member

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    I wonder if it would work with an eSata drive?

    Colin
     
  4. krockroc

    krockroc Registered Member

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    Hi,

    Thanks fo the replies.

    I am a bit techie, but just a bit better than rubbish when it comes to hardware. What's an eSATA drive? Is it different to a SATA drive?

    I have seen plenty of articles saying that Windows can be booted from USB, varying from incredibly difficult to very simple:
    e.g.
    http://www.ngine.de/article/id/8
    http://www.hddsaver.com/content/18/two.html

    I have also just seen people saying that they have done similar using Acronis and Virtual PC. I might try that:

    http://www.techsupportforum.com/mic...-acronis-tib-images-ms-virtual-pc-2004-a.html
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/archive/index.php/t-208760.html

    Anyone ever used Virtual PC for this?

    Thanks.
     
  5. Livio

    Livio Registered Member

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    Yes it does work , eSata and internal Sata are the same drive interface.
     
  6. bodgy

    bodgy Registered Member

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    eSata is an external SATA connection. The connectors are slightly different at the drive casing end (not the actual harddrive as that is standard, but the case that houses the drive and interface)

    Yes I did manage to get HomeServer to boot from an eSata.

    Colin
     
  7. krockroc

    krockroc Registered Member

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    that sounds like my Iomega external drive is not eSata so.
    I think I know the negative answer to this question already but.... are they convertible?

    I might look into buying one.
     
  8. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    The SATA definition was enhanced to accomodate eSATA (high voltage, so they are electronically equivalent now despite a diff physical connector.

    The definition changes were:
    Double SATA cable length from 1 to 2 m;
    Send voltage level increased from 400-600 mV to 500-600 mV to compensate for losses and longer cables;
    Recieve voltage span decreased from 325-600 mV to 240-600 mV to allow for greater losses with longer cables;
    EM shielding of eSATA connectors by means of a small metal cage;
    Lock mechanism for eSATA connectors -- some SATA connectors have "locks" on them now and boy, did they need them!


     
  9. Livio

    Livio Registered Member

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    yeah , good improvement, those damn Sata connectors tend to come loose too easily sometimes.
     
  10. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    not only do they come loose easily, but after just a few pushon/pulloffs, they can become unreliable for data--bad enough to prevent a drive from being recognized.

    The newer definition should help (with the higher send voltage and lower required receive voltage) should help with that problem laong with better, or at least more secure connectors.
     
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