USAF's Encryption program?

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by itsonlyme999, Mar 5, 2013.

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  1. itsonlyme999

    itsonlyme999 Registered Member

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    Can you please tell me if this is trustworthy enough to be used to encrypt my files instead of using something like TrueCrypt?
    http://spi.dod.mil/ewizard.htm

    Its been approved and developed by the USAF/DoD, theres two versions: Gov. (which is not available to the general user) and Public which basically are the same but the Public version does not have the FIPS 140-2 module and both uses the AES-128.

    Should this be good enough if I want to keep my sensitive files safe?

    Thanks.
     
  2. ComputerSaysNo

    ComputerSaysNo Registered Member

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    I wouldn't trust anything that isn't open source. That's my 2 cents. The more eyes the better.
     
  3. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    Needs Java. Built by the USG. No thanks. Why not TC? Or AxCrypt, or 7Zip Encryption?

    PD
     
  4. Cutting_Edgetech

    Cutting_Edgetech Registered Member

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    The public version probably has a back door, and the Government version does not. No way to really know, but i would not trust them. Your better off using TC!
     
  5. itsonlyme999

    itsonlyme999 Registered Member

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    OK, I will try TrueCrypt. I just dont trust the Java part.

    But....Does TrueCrypt have AES-256 or only AES-128 for file or full whole disk encryption?
    AES-256 has much better encryption security, and I want to have my files and my whole disk encrypted with AES-256 instead of AES-128.
    So does it support or have the AES-256 or only AES-128?

    Im sorry, but Im a bit "rusty" when it comes to encryption...

    Thanks
     
  6. popcorn

    popcorn Registered Member

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    AES 256 :thumb:
    Your in the right place to "polish" up your know how here :)

    TC doesn't employ Java
     
  7. itsonlyme999

    itsonlyme999 Registered Member

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    Also another question...Sorry -

    I will give TC a try and if in case something goes wrong, I can just restore my OS image.

    But in case I want to restore my OS image (which is not encrypted), then will the TC password still be prompted upon system bootup once the OS image is restored?
    Or, when restoring my image, will it just wipe the TC boot loader after the image restore?
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2013
  8. popcorn

    popcorn Registered Member

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    No worries
    I aren't certain never having had to do what you ask
    I suspect the TC bootloader will persist however I would wait for someone with better knowledge in this area than me to respond.
     
  9. itsonlyme999

    itsonlyme999 Registered Member

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    Im still confused here. Take a look at my print screen attached.
    How can I tell if its really AES-256? I see there is also a Block Size of 128 bits.
    So what does this mean? Is it encrypted with AES-256 or AES-128?

    Of course, its not 100% full encryption since I am in the process now of encrypting.

    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

  10. popcorn

    popcorn Registered Member

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  11. itsonlyme999

    itsonlyme999 Registered Member

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    I will read on this more. To get more knowledge of how encryption works. And Im sure it will take me tme to learn this.

    But for now, (by looking at my print screen) I just want to know if I am using AES-256 or AES-128.

    Thanks
     
  12. popcorn

    popcorn Registered Member

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    Quote teken from my above link -
    "AES supports block and key sizes of 128, 192, and 256 bits, but in AES the block size is always 128 bits. The extra block sizes were not adopted by the AES standard."

    You are using AES 256 :thumb:
     
  13. itsonlyme999

    itsonlyme999 Registered Member

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    Ok finally got it now. I also read the TC PDF user manual which explains as well.

    If most users trust TC and claims its very good, then how come Enterprise businesses dont seem to have it as their encryption solution?

    Thanks again for the help.
     
  14. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    Because it doesn't really support multi-user, corporate use, with key escrow/recovery, etc...easily. Businesses want to get in easily, in case of termination, job changes, etc...

    PD
     
  15. Warlockz

    Warlockz Registered Member

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    Another alternative to look into as an alternative to truecrypt is DiskCryptor

    http://diskcryptor.net/wiki/Main_Page/en

    • Support for encryption algorithm AES, Twofish, Serpent, including their combinations.
    • Transparent encryption of disk partitions.
    • Full support for dynamic disks.
    • Support for disk devices with large sector size (important for hardware RAID operation).
    • High performance, comparable to efficiency of a non-encrypted system.
    • Support for hardware AES acceleration:
    • AES-NI instruction set on new Intel CPU;
    • PadLock extensions on VIA processors.
    • Broad choice in configuration of booting an encrypted OS. Support for various multi-boot options.
    • Full compatibility with third party boot loaders (LILO, GRUB, etc.).
    • Encryption of system and bootable partitions with pre-boot authentication.
    • Option to place boot loader on external medium and to authenticate using the key medium.
    • Support for key files.
    • Full support for external storage devices.
    • Option to create encrypted CD and DVD disks.
    • Full support for encryption of external USB storage devices.
    • Automatic mounting of disk partitions and external storage devices.
    • Support for hotkeys and optional command-line interface (CLI).
    • Open license GNU GPLv3.
     
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