Truecrypt problem !

Discussion in 'encryption problems' started by playzzzz, Mar 17, 2013.

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  1. playzzzz

    playzzzz Registered Member

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    Hi everybody,

    First, sorry if I make grammar mistakes.

    So, Yesterday, I had a big problems with Truecrypt. I cannot access to my hidden volume. I

    can mount it but when I try to open it, I have an error:
    * Drive is not accessible. The volume does not contain a recognized filesystem.
    or
    * The drive is not formatted, do you want to format it now?

    I don't want to format it, I want my data back.

    When attempting to repair using chkdsk, the following error is reported: 'CHKDSK is not available for RAW drives.'.

    Here is the configuration
    * Outter-volume:
    Algorithm: AES, format: FAT32, space: 600MB
    *Hidden-volume
    Algorithm: AES-Twofish-Serpent, space 550 MB

    So I installed testdisk and tried to recover data but here is the file I get:
    http://www.imagup.com/npic/1178184249.html
    That's the file at the right bottom.

    I don't know what to with it, I don't even know if I can open it to recover my datas.

    I installed "GetBackData for FAT" but it said that it hasn't find FAT format...

    Please, help me recover this data.

    Thank you for your future help
     
  2. playzzzz

    playzzzz Registered Member

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    Please, someone can help me find a solution?
     
  3. dantz

    dantz Registered Member

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    Hawaii
    So how did this happen? Did you add data to your outer volume without using the "hidden volume protection" feature? That would tend to overwrite a portion of the hidden volume.

    It's clear that your outer volume is formatted FAT, but are you sure that the inner (hidden) volume is also? I wonder if you're using the correct version of GetDataBack.

    If your file types are supported by PhotoRec, it might be worth a try.
     
  4. playzzzz

    playzzzz Registered Member

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    Actually, I've lost my data. That's not really a big problem, it wasn't something really important, just some information that are in my head.
    Well, I didn't use the feature you said... :/ Can't understand why it's not selected by default.

    Yes the hidden volume was also FAT. But nevermind, I tested with the NTFS version and it cannot find anything too...

    As I said, my data are actually deleted for good. But I would like to know how to do a good encryption without any error next time ?

    Using the "hidden volume protection" feature would have prevent this problem? That's it?
     
  5. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    It should/will. The hidden volume is offset by an automatic minimum, or user selectable maximum amount, inside the outer volume. If you don't protect it, and add data that amounts to greater than the offset, it overwrites the header for the hidden container and you can't access the data anymore.

    Dantz, if he has a hidden header backup, can he restore it, or use embedded backup?

    PD
     
  6. dantz

    dantz Registered Member

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    All four 64KB headers (outer, inner and two embedded backups) reside outside the data area of the outer volume, and thus they are not susceptible to being overwritten under this scenario. And since the OP can still mount his inner volume, this shows that the header for the inner volume is still intact.

    An intact header allows the user to mount and decrypt a volume, regardless of the volume contents. If the volume can be mounted (while using the correct header) then the header is still good, even though the volume's contents may have been thoroughly trashed. As far as the header is concerned, the contents of the volume are irrelevant.

    It appears that the OP has accidentally overwritten a portion of his inner volume's file system and data because he didn't use the hidden volume protection feature. However, damaging a volume's file system doesn't necessarily destroy all of its data. Based on the extent of the overwrite, some of the inner volume's data might still exist. That's why I suggested using "file carving" data-recovery software like PhotoRec, as these types of programs are designed to function in the absence of a file system.
     
  7. PaulyDefran

    PaulyDefran Registered Member

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    Awesome, thanks for the education. *Always* still learning :D

    PD
     
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