TrueCrypt, DiskCryptor and whole disk encryption

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by n8chavez, Apr 14, 2010.

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  1. n8chavez

    n8chavez Registered Member

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    I need a little help here. I've recently decided to encrypt my entire hard disk and ditch Rohos Logon Key, but I need a little advice first. I need any and all opinions on TrueCrypt's ability to encryupt the entire disk as well as those of DiskCryptor's.

    From what I understand, TrueCrypt allows for the entire disk to be "mounted" at startup. This is different, because it does not mount each partition individually, as does DiskCryptor. What I want to know is, is that a bad thing or a go thing? I rely heavily on partition images as a means of backup and I'm not sure what effect encryption the entire disk with TrueCrypt, using whole disk encryption, will have on the images I make. Will I be able to restore them if I need to like regular?

    On the other hand diskcryptor treats each partition independently, which would be a lot easier to image. But my problem with this is that partitions that are not recognized, meaning that they do not have a valid file system, are too easily format able, either or accident or on purpose. This can be doner too easily with any sort of PE, which I use frequently.

    Any thoughts or opinions?
     
  2. LockBox

    LockBox Registered Member

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    Good question, Nate. Keep in mind that with TrueCrypt, you don't have to encrypt the entire system drive. You could choose to have several partitions (or large containers if NTFS) that are NOT part of the system encryption. You can, in fact, encrypt your system partition only that would mount after BootAuth. And keep in mind it's different with Windows 7 than with Windows XP. With XP, you can only encrypt a system partition or a system drive - one or the other. Windows 7 gives you a few more options.
     
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