True Image Backup Speed

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Michael Gardner, Apr 11, 2007.

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  1. Michael Gardner

    Michael Gardner Registered Member

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    I just installed Acronis True Image after a very bad experience with Ghost. I have did a full hard drive backup to external hard drive. It took only 5 minutes. Looking at the file it is 50% compressed from 11 gigs to 5 gigs but I have a problem believing that. I could see the backup taking 3 hours but 5 minutes? Did I do a full hard drive backup?
     
  2. billcondie

    billcondie Registered Member

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    That does not seem possible. I'd try it again.
     
  3. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    Sounds possible to me.
    I have a pc that backs up 8 GB at full compression in about 3-4 min.
    And then, another PC with the same amount of data that backs up in 25 min.
    Mrk
     
  4. worldcitizen

    worldcitizen Registered Member

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    That's why I love True Image. On a newly installed system the time for backing up is just ridiculously low. I couldn't even make a coffee before the backup was finished and when I had to replace my drive and used the backup it worked flawlessly and I was up and running again in minutes.
     
  5. Mele20

    Mele20 Former Poster

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    It takes TI about 3 hours to do a full back up of my 160GB hard drive. I don't how anyone can do a full backup in 5 minutes. I don't do incremental ones ever as they are not reliable. I need to do another full backup...been four months since I did one but they take so long.
     
  6. worldcitizen

    worldcitizen Registered Member

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    It all depends on how much data you are backing up. What I do is keep all my things like games, movies etc on another hard drive - D drive and only backup my C drive with the operating system and whatever I have installed which sometimes includes some games. But 25 minutes is the most I've ever needed to back up my C drive when it had around 50 gigabytes of data on it. For me True Image is very useful in case my system gets stuffed up. For backing up huge files I use another hard drive.

    If it's taking too long maybe you need to turn your antivirus off because if it checks while backing up that could take a lot of time. Another thing is your hard drive may need replacing because 3 hrs sounds like an aweful lot of time for True Image to make and image.
     
  7. Mele20

    Mele20 Former Poster

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    It takes that long, I think, because I don't have the drive partioned so I back up everything on the drive and about 110GB have been used of the 160GB drive. I had the new F-Prot at the last backup and I think I had it turned off, but not sure. I just tested the hard drive through Speed Fan and it is in fine shape.
     
  8. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    In addition to the above, do lots of house keeping before a backup run. Clear out all temp files not just the internet ones. If a defrag is due do it. If Windows system restore is active it can take up to 12% of the drive,in this instance 19 GB ! either turn it off or just keep the latest point.
    Backup from Windows this is usually much faster than from the rescue CD unless you are using a Bart PE version.
    Best of all is to backup to another internal drive if speed is what you want. Other media can be much slower.
     
  9. worldcitizen

    worldcitizen Registered Member

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    Also, SATA drives are much faster than PATA. When I was using the old PATA drives it took ages to make a True Image. I don't remember how long it took but it has been a lot, lot faster with the new SATA drives.
     
  10. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    About a minute per GB is, very roughly, about what you should see unless you have USB involved, then it can sometimes take much longer. On really zippy new systems, it can take even less time - 10 GB in 5 minutes is not unrealistic.

     
  11. Mele20

    Mele20 Former Poster

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    I have a one year old Dell XPS 600 3.8GhZ Pentium IV with Sata3 drive. But I back up to an external USB Seagate drive. I do it through Windows.
     
  12. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    You are being throttled by the USB drive.

    Since you have a fast processor the compression time should not be much of a factor and you may gain a bit by going to the highest level of compression since it reduces the amount of data to be sent via the slower USB connection. However, if most of your data is jpg, mpg, zip, rar, files they are already compressed and further attempts at compression are a waste of time and may make the files bigger.

    The fastest backup is to another internal drive so if you want to see what the machine will do, make a backup to another internal drive or failing that make it to another partition on the same drive which won't be quite as fast but still faster than USB.
     
  13. Mele20

    Mele20 Former Poster

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    Yes, USB is not fast but why would I want to back up to another internal hard drive? If the computer doesn't boot...I think an external drive is the best place to backup to even if it does take a long time. The issue is moot for me as I only have one hard drive.
     
  14. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    If the computer does not boot you could use the recovery CD [​IMG]. But seriously you have the possibility to fit a second drive and more to your PC.
    You have spare Drive bays and also room for exchangable drive drawers. IMHO having two main drives in removable drawers is the way to go for a whole host of reasons. These can be exchanged and updated from backup images that have been made automatically to an internal secondary drive.


    Xpilot
     
  15. mfabien

    mfabien Registered Member

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    1. This morning my 15 GB HDD was imaged and stored in 11 GB. It took 12 minutes to complete and 8 minutes to validate. Backup goes to a USB external HDD.

    About the same every week.

    2. Using the Acronis Rescue CD takes about the above time x 3.

    3. Using BartPE CD takes about the same time as above (1.), using the internal Windows XP.
     
  16. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    My experience, using ATI plugin for UBCD4WIN / BartPE shortens both the backup and restore time approx 3-4x.
    Mrk
     
  17. mfabien

    mfabien Registered Member

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    ...compared to ATI rescue CD.
     
  18. Mele20

    Mele20 Former Poster

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    That's assuming the recovery CD works. I wouldn't bet on it. Incremental backups don't work so why should I believe the recovery CD would? I don't even know where it is off hand and it was made on an XP Pro SP1 computer. Will it work on an SP 2 computer?

    I've never heard of removable drive drawers. Besides, I have no intention of dragging a 50 pound tower out of its cabinet so I can get in it unless there is something wrong. I only weigh 104 pounds. This computer is heavy! I know I have space for several more hard drives internally but I still have 40GB left on the original drive. I don't see the point in buying another drive. Although, if I could still get one identical to the Samsung I have I probably would have done that, but those were discontinued shortly after I got this computer. I don't want a Seagate or a Maxtor or a Western Digital. I wanted a second Samsung to match the one I have. Since I can't get that, I will likely get a second drive only if I start to run out of space on this one. I bought the external drive specifically for backups. It would a waste of my money to not use it. But I should have been warned how slow they would be before I bought it. I still would have gotten it though as I got it primarily so I could backup my Dell 8300 that was being replaced under warranty with this XPS 600. Of course, I could not use the image on the XPS as the hardware was too different but I was able to mount the drive virtually and copy everything I wanted.
     
  19. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    An up to date and tested recovery CD is an essential part of your backup kit should you ever have a hard drive failure.

    Have a look here http://www.startech.com/Product/ItemDetail.aspx?productid=DRW110SAT&c=UK

    To see an typical example of internal hard drive caddies.
    Once you have taken on board how easy they are to use you will be amazed how they can improve your computing experience.

    Xpilot
     
  20. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    Because it is very fast and you don't have to find it and plug it in you will tend to make safety backups before testing software or installing new hardware.

    While having the second drive in the machine means that it will be gone if the PC catches fire or gets stolen, by far the most common HD failure problem is a failure of a single drive. I do copy selected backups to an external for insurance against the unlikely events but I have never needed them.

    PS: I think Xpilot's "drive caddy/use the backup right away" method is excellent.
     
  21. dbknox

    dbknox Registered Member

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    But after saying all the above a "rescue CD" is very important for restoring after a Hard drive failure. Try making one and testing it out you may end up being quite pleased with it. ( or not).
    I have a internal backup hard drive with 3 partions, one soley for images.
    I also have an external usb hard drive,which for reasons unknown seems to backup and restore as fast as from and to the internal drive. If there is a difference in times it is minamal. ( I guess Im lucky.)
    I only image 12 gigs and it takes around 7 minutes. I have restored many times using my "rescue disk". ( this also takes around 7 minutes) I have Pata drives.
     
  22. Mele20

    Mele20 Former Poster

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    That didn't make any sense to me. Looks to me like you still have to install it. So, what is the point? Just install a regular internal drive if you want to do RAID or need another hard drive. Use the external USB drive for backups.
     
  23. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    The point is that you make the effort once to install the drive drawer/rack. Then changing a hard drive for another becomes as easy as rebooting from a CD.

    It gives me a fire-proof, crash proof 100% backup system. Because my main hard drive is not backed up by an unproved image but two other updated hard drives ready to go should the need arise.

    As far as using a USB drive for backup images and restores I won't list all the disadvantages just the one you came in with and that is its lack of speed.

    Xpilot
     
  24. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Mele20

    I just ran a test on my machine. 19.9gb imaged by ATI v9 build 3854 in 5 min 34 seconds. That is to a second internal drive. I've found on my machine imaging to an external Lacie USB drive it maybe a half a minute slower.

    You asked what happens if the recovery CD doesn't work. Then you are out of luck cause if you can't boot to windows how do you restore from an external drive.

    If you haven't tested by restoring from the Recovery CD or a BartePE disk, you really haven't done anything cause you don't know if you can restore.

    Personally I test restore every image I make.

    Pete
     
  25. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello Michael Gardner,

    Please see my answer in your other thread.

    Please try to avoid posting duplicate requests in the future as it makes us as well as other forum members do additional work, and delay others.

    Thank you.
    --
    Marat Setdikov
     
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