To Buy or not to buy

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by krishcanag, Jan 6, 2008.

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  1. krishcanag

    krishcanag Registered Member

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    Hello

    I am trying to figure out if true image or any other backup software is for me. I was hoping someone here might respond to my questions.

    What I want is a package that backups up the whole NTFS C: drive only, without touching the partioned D: drive (contains compaq PC recovery files)
    This therefore will include registry, programs, etc, etc...

    questions
    1. How do you know that if you attempt to recover to a backed up image it will work without any issue and if it fails can you go back to where you were before you attempted to recover PC from a saved image?

    2. When you do a backup (I take it that I am talking about drive image backup) can it be done on a USB attached drive or will a network drive be in anyway better?

    3. Windows provide NTBACKUPS, why cannot this be used to backup whole C drive like explained above?

    many thanks

    krishan
     
  2. AaronAnderson

    AaronAnderson Registered Member

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    Acronis will probably do exactly what you need it to. I was 100 percent certain it would, until Echo came out, and it seems to be less compatible and has features that aren't fully functioning yet.

    Download a trial version and try it?
     
  3. krishcanag

    krishcanag Registered Member

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    1 million dollar question: HOW DO YOU KNOW IT WORKS PEFECTLY?

    Unless you restore from a backup and see or does it have a checksum check to confirm error free transfer and does that mean for sure all programs and registry is as before, I don't know the answer to this question, if you are doing a straight one file data transfer the checksum will do, but in this case not sure.
    How do people normally feel confident it works for sure? This is on any image software.

    regards

    krishan
     
  4. jonyjoe81

    jonyjoe81 Registered Member

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    True image will allow you to backup only the c: partition, without touching the other partitions. Thats call an image backup. When you do a clone backup, your backing up the entire hard drive which include all the partitions. I only backup my c: drive, and never do clones.

    question 1 . If you are restoring an image to the same hardrive/same partition theres a very good chance it will work. In my cases everytime I've restored that way it has worked the first time. When restoring to a different hard drive it's 50/50 chance it will work the first time. Usually you might have to do a repair. But once you start the recovery, thats it , theres no going back. The restored process will rewrite your original c partition. The only way not to damage your source drive is to restored to a different hard drive.

    question 2 . When you backup your c: drive, you can store that image on a different partition on the same drive (not recommended), you can store it on a different hard drive inside your pc, you can store it to usb external drive or network drive or even dvd's.

    question 3 .ntbackups is too complicated for the average person to use as a image recovery system and it requires you to have the original installion disk.

    I would stay away from using the secure zone, and instead save an image backup of my c: partition on another hard drive inside my pc. If my c: drive gets corrupted or virus infected, I would just restored that partition using the saved image. To me this works better than using windows system restore.

    The only thing is I'm still using true image 9.0, which does all the basic stuff true image 11 does. But notice alot of people having problems with true image 11 lately and for some it works perfectly. These forums provide good technical advice for those who need it. I tried other image backup programs but I prefer true image easy to use interface.
     
  5. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

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    If you are talking about an image of C: then I don't know of a way to "be sure".
    Perhaps if you make the image with an emergency CD ? The problem of trying to
    compare from within windows is that the act of booting changes files and running a file comparison from within windows will change more files so you will end up with 32876 files are the same and 236 differ.

    At a more practical level I was lucky enough to have never heard of sites like wilders when I first started with Acronis 6. I just made a full image of my C: partition and then changed the desktop to simulate change, and then restored - all with no problems at all.

    since then I have used versions 7, 8, 9, 9.1, 10 and 11 and made and restored thousands of images of C: and my data partition /drives.

    Yesterday I was testing 3 programs and must have restored C: 10 times or more.

    So How will you know that it works ? make a full image of C: make some changes to C: and then restore. Forget about the complicated bits like zones and just make a simple system image. Provided that you have backed up your data the worst that can happen is that you destroy C: and have to reformat and re-install. Assumng that this does not happen you will in future have far more protection and should keep multiple images of C: just in case.

    good luck
     
  6. krishcanag

    krishcanag Registered Member

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    Thanks guys for your detailed reasoning. I understand the limitations now and also understand methods to test. I am aware the 11 is causing issues and was most interested in buying 10.

    My orginal reason for this is either perfectdosk8 (unlikely) or cccleaner/registry mechanic7 created issues and forced total re-install, restore did not work as it was messed up as well. cdrom's disappeared.

    Now without loading either and running tuneup utilites I haven't come across any issues. But it is still better to have a backup option given its taken me 3 days and 6 reinstalls to work out which programs might be causing an issue.

    regrads

    krishan
     
  7. krishcanag

    krishcanag Registered Member

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    There was something that came to me, if you have a second HDD then would it not be possible to image your c drive to that disk and then go into setup and change boot order to the new 2nd hdd, then if all loads as before one does not have attempt a restore to confirm valid image? Would you agreee?

    krishan
     
  8. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

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    I have never done this but I have read that it works just fine. Buy 2 drives exactly the same - install to A and then image and restore to B. Some do it this way as a matter of routine - using drive caddies.
     
  9. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Yes, with modifications to your scenerio.
    1. Make the restore (using the TI Recovery CD) to the second disk and shutdown.
    2. Remove the original disk and place the second disk on same connectors (and jumpers) as original. Do NOT connect the original.
    3. Reboot so the second disk has identically replaced the original disk. Original disk not connected.
    4. Bootup should be successful. Then you can shutdown attach the original as a second or slave drive and control your boot order by drive selection. The key is have Windows only see one drive on first bootup after the recovery.

    However, keep in mind: Should you have any other partitions (hidden or diagnostic) on the original drive, these must be considered and adjustment made to your procedure. You would need to have a "disk" backup rather than a "partition" backup. Likewise, the restore would need to be a "disk" restore and not a "partition" restore (unless all partitions restored with resizing).

    Checkout my Guides listed below. Also be sure you assign easily identifiable names to your drives.
     
  10. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    The answer to this is simple, with it is ATI or any imaging program. Restore. I test restore every image I make. Also I restore it to the disk I imaged.

    To check the image, first, generally I mount it an extact a file or two.

    The first time you do it, it's good to have some fall back just in case the restore fails, but after you do it a few times it kinda gets old hat.

    The reason I don't restore to some other drive, is if I image in case something I am going to do goes wrong, I want to know the image will restore to my c: drive, not some other drive.

    Candidly I was scared to death the first time, but now I've done it enough, I don't give it any thought.

    Pete
     
  11. cmyaucm

    cmyaucm Registered Member

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    You have answered your own concern. Since you are backing up/clone the system drive C: (I assumed), booting into it is the best insurance and run those precious programs will convince you that the image works. Acronis has helped me in numerous system drive clonings and till date, it has not failed but the newer Echo Server upset me... but I think Acronis will perfect it.

    Briefly this is what I did: clone my 40gb system/boot drive with a 250gb drive. You will realise that the cloning is a perfect photocopy. You can check the hdd volume serial (similar). On completion, change my BIOS setup to boot from the cloned drive. Happy with it, I will partition the cloned drive into 2 partions. 40gb for the system and the rest for a new 200gb for anything you like to put in. Now I'm running on the faster 250 drive and have the original 40gb as standby engine. If you intend to migrate to another computer, I suggest you buy Universal Restore - the fastest way to migrate!

    So the answer to you original question is: BUY
     
  12. krishcanag

    krishcanag Registered Member

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    On my disk there is the c drive and a d drive which contains the recovery OS and compaq default software. I therefore would need whatever adjustments that are required, what are they?

    krishan
     
  13. krishcanag

    krishcanag Registered Member

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    when you say you test restore every image you amke, does that mean;
    1. create image
    2. reboot
    3. restore just created image
    4. check all is ok.

    What do you mean to check image you mount it to a file or 2?

    regards

    krishan
     
  14. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Welcome to the Forum! The last paragraph of my previous posting gave you the variations I was referencing.

    I would strongly urge you to invest some time researching previous postings. This will help you NOT to waste a lot of time trying to recover from a mistakewhich could have been prevented by a little advance reading.

    A search of previous questions will show that most have already been asked and answered--very few are really new. One good place to start your research is "Useful Form Threads" sticky (see signature below) which has topics such as:
    Best Practice - Testing an image archive
    How to restore to a replacement hard drive
    Acronis Secure Zone and Startup Recovery Manager
    Need Help? These Beginner's Guides May Fill That Need!​
    Best way for making functioning images
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=1047306

    Chapter 13 of Acronis User Manual discusses the "mounting" of images as mentioned by Peter above. After you review Chapter 13, re-ask any questions about mounting. When done mounting, be sure and dis-mount your image. A forum search can provide additional info. One example of a previous discussion is this link. It is old but still valid.

    When/Why do people mount by Roger Macon
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=154735
    ------------------------------------------------------
     
  15. sparkymachine

    sparkymachine Registered Member

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    You tell em Grover but don't have a heart attack
     
  16. KennethS

    KennethS Registered Member

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    Howdy,

    I have seen others suggest this, but...

    Suppose I create an image, and to test it, I restore to the original disk I imaged. But, when I do, it fails.

    What would I do next? Would I have to re-build everything that was on that disk?

    I may be misinterpreting your suggestion, but it certainly seems to me that the only meaningful way to test an image is to restore it to a different disk that could then be tested.

    Thanks for any further information on this,

    Kenneth
     
  17. krishcanag

    krishcanag Registered Member

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    thanks groverH for your response, sorry if I am testing your patience.

    krishan
     
  18. Long View

    Long View Registered Member

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    The only absolutely sure way is to restore to the original. In practice any real difference between 2 exactly the same drives must only be theoretical.

    The first time you restore is the time of greatest risk. If you have different partitions or drives with C: ( OS and programs) on one drive or partition and data elsewhere the worst that can happen is a couple of hours of format and reinstall.

    Once the first image has successfully restored and you make a second and a third the risk just fades away. If I ever had a restore failure ( 1,000 + restores to date) I would simply go to the image made the day before. If that one failed I would go to the previous one. Obviously the first time the is no other image to go to. Fortunately when I first started I had no idea of the theoretical risks and simply made and restored a full image without any problems. It was only when I came to Wilders that I realized how easily people could turn thing from easy to difficult.
     
  19. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    krishan,
    If my response showed impatience, my apology. You obviously want to learn more about TI otherwise you would not be asking questions. The more you read, the better you will understand.
     
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