TI9 - Using the Clone utility

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Catamaran, Jun 15, 2006.

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  1. Catamaran

    Catamaran Registered Member

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    I want to try using the TI9 Clone Utility to clone the system disk . Reading numerous posts on this Forum makes me think that this can be a scary process that can lead to disaster if unsuccessful. However, I have a spare disk and want to learn how to use the Clone Utility, using this spare disk, as I may need to do it for real one day.

    Because it is the system disk that I want to clone, I will boot from the TI9 CD and perform the process using the Linux interface. I believe that this is the best way to do it because the system disk will be "at rest" with no open files or processes.

    As this is only a "test", I don't acutally want anything to change on the existing system. This is my work PC so I do need to be absolutely sure that the existing system will remain intact and unaffected by the process. When I have completed the process I want to test the clone by swapping out the existing system disk and the clone and then booting from the clone. If the system boots and all software runs properly then that will be the end of the test.

    The disk arrangement is as follows: -

    Disk 1 - Internal SATA. 4 partitions. System on partition 1 drive C:
    Disk 2 - Internal SATA. Data only
    Disk 3 - External SATA. This is the spare disk that I will use as the destination. (Identical specification to the source disk).

    A few questions for those more knowledgeable about this process:

    * Are there any documents (other than the TI9 User Guide) that provide "best practice" guidelines when using the Clone Utility?

    * Before starting this process should I clear the spare disk and leave the entire disk space as "unallocated" or should I create a single Primary partition across the entire disk?

    * My biggest fear is that I will screw something up and end up with an unbootable system. Do Forum Members have any safeguards to ensure that the process is 100% safe?

    Thanks for your feedback.
     
  2. mark3

    mark3 Registered Member

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    Yes there are replies that are posted from Acronis Support. Below is one that I extracted from one of the threads. (Proof reading I now realise that it refers more to pros and cons for cloning and backup).

    You do not have to do anything with the disk. A clone overwrites the whole disk.

    You need not worry as long as you disconnect the external hard drive before rebooting. Windows does not take too kindly to two copies booting up at the same time.

    Since you have three disks, I would suggest that you follow Acronis suggestion and do a backup instead. They outline many advantages over cloning.
    I would suggest that you create an image of your first disk onto your second disk.(It takes up very little space). Then restore the image onto your third disk and finally swap your third with your first disk to see if the restored image works. Once you have determined that restoring does work for you, you could format your third disk and use it as a data disk. The second disk could be used to store images of the first disk. That way you are fully utilising your hard disks.
    If you would still like to keep a clone then get a cheap disk off eBay and restore the image to it. Once you have checked that it works, keep it in a draw. If you keep your clone in the external drive you might one day, inadvertently, switch it on while booting. Then you will be in a pickle.
     
  3. Catamaran

    Catamaran Registered Member

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    Tks mark3 for your quick response and your suggestions.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2006
  4. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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    Hello Catamaran,

    Thank you for choosing Acronis Disk Backup Software.

    First of all please note that during the clone procedure no data will be lost because the original disk is only being read (no partitions are changed or resized) until data transfer is completed. The only case Acronis True Image 9.0 Home can change the original drive is if you select the manual clone mode and select either "remove all information from the old disk" or "create new partitions on the old disk (and remove all the older information)" (please check Chapter 12.3.6 "Old disk data" in the Acronis True Image 9.0 Home User's Guide.)

    Please also note that as mark3 mentioned you do not need to perform any additional operations on the destination hard drive since all existing partitions will be deleted during cloning and all their data will be lost.

    You might also would like to have a look at this post.

    And would like to warn once again to unplug one of the hard drives right after the disk cloning process has been finished, since keeping both original and cloned hard drives connected might cause different boot or drive letter assignment problems.

    Thank you.
    --
    Aleksandr Isakov
     
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