This 11-year-old is selling cryptographically secure passwords for $2 each

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by Minimalist, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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  2. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    Interesting approach, I must say. I hope she gets more interested in cryptography and start programming ; Or open a cryptography multi-billionaire company.
     
  3. driekus

    driekus Registered Member

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    You have to admire her for her advocation of privacy and entrepreneurial spirit.
     
  4. Joxx

    Joxx Registered Member

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    you have to admire the world for going completely insane and not noticing ...
     
  5. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    A password that someone else knows can not be secure.
     
  6. driekus

    driekus Registered Member

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    Cmon, give an 11 year old a break :)
     
  7. ProTruckDriver

    ProTruckDriver Registered Member

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    Yeah, go ahead and order a password with your credit card. Then she'll have that number also. :eek:
     
  8. oliverjia

    oliverjia Registered Member

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    Whoever bought password from others is pure stupid. There are tons of free, open source random password generators out there.
     
  9. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    I bet a statistically significant number of buyers bought as encouragement to the 11yo's entrepreneurial actions. And won't use the pw of course.
     
  10. subhrobhandari

    subhrobhandari Registered Member

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    I think the 11 year old is being used as a nice clickbait, it sure sounds better than a 30-year old selling passwords. I would have supported if she was trying to educate people, but passwords are something that should be only known by the user, selling a password a no-no in my idea. And is it really hard for someone to open the mail and then seal it?

    If someone wants to have diceware passwords, it's pretty easy:

    1. Go to https://grempe.github.io/diceware/ or https://entima.net/diceware/
    2. Disable your internet for a minute if you are paranoid
    3. Generate and copy the passwords
    4. Close the website and enable your internet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2015
  11. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Yes, I think so also. Also it's a nice method to generate passwords that anybody can use.
     
  12. Keatah

    Keatah Registered Member

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    Just make up your own.
     
  13. anon

    anon Registered Member

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    ......give an 11 year old a break $2

    +1
     
  14. stackz

    stackz Registered Member

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    I just got back from the local shops. While there, I heard a newborn baby uttering cryptographically secure pass phrases. o_O
     
  15. Malwar

    Malwar Registered Member

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    You just made my morning!!!:D:D:p:argh::):thumb::cool:
     
  16. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    When we were kids, we used to sell apples and oranges and such in our neighborhood ... oh, well.
    Mrk
     
  17. ProTruckDriver

    ProTruckDriver Registered Member

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    Those were the good old days. :thumb:
    Now a days you need a license to sell apples and oranges no matter how old you are. :argh:
    I wonder if the 11 year old has a license?
     
  18. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    If you want really secure passwords, do not generate them on a computer and certainly not on an online service. Rolling physical dice in a darkened room with no technology and a running tap is the way to go.
     
  19. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Yes, that would make really secure passwords, if you are let's say a target of 3 letter agencies. Too bad that first keylogger (or some other method of extraction) will send it to 3rd party...
     
  20. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    Not all passwords are on systems that can be (easily) keylogged and exfiltrated (e..g airgapped systems for keygen and password and certificate management).
    And the password can also be backed with TFA (e.g. Keypass, Lastpass etc doing the bulk online password generation), windows and linux accounts etc. And some websites (gasp) - even support TFA. Not nearly enough...
    Then, have hierarchies for the use & distribution of passwords, limiting exposure of compromise.
    Quite agree that if you're TLA targeted, you're toast in so many ways, but I'm not sure that would be the worst of my concerns at that point, I'm vulnerable to wrenches! But, in a way, that's what I accept as a citizen, that they would have to pay me personal attention (which costs money), rather than the mass surveillance and hoovering approach.
     
  21. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Yes I agree with you. Because you've mentioned running tap while creating passwords I thought that user is targeted by TLA. In case of such situation password would be safe only until first time used.
     
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