The ultimate guide to Linux for Windows users

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by Mrkvonic, May 20, 2014.

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  1. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Please, breathe deeply. This is going to be super long. I've compiled the ultimate, most comprehensive guide to the Linux operating system for Windows users, newbies and fresh converts, including Linux history, purpose, major differences between Windows and Linux, Linux architecture, Linux distributions overview, Linux distribution components, desktop environments - KDE, Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon and others, Linux package managers - APT, YUM, Zypper and others, Linux command line, popular and most useful commands, filesystem layout, disk layout, special devices, how to find Linux, top distributions and reviews, where to start, Windows installation, Linux installation, dual-boot side-by-side configuration, how Linux works, boot process, runlevels, user setup, common desktop activities and overview, common software, common games, common tasks like Wireless, graphical drivers and desktop wallpaper setup examples, additional look & feel and customization guides, best Linux resources, tons of other examples and references, and more. I honestly hope you will find this most enjoyable and practical.

    http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/ultimate-linux-guide-for-windows-users.html


    Cheers,
    Mrk
     
  2. beethoven

    beethoven Registered Member

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    While I will have to find some quiet moment to study this and give it the attention it deserves, I very much appreciate the effort you put into it. I have been impressed before by your reviews but this really looks comprehensive and the first thing I did was to bookmark it. Many thanks
     
  3. kareldjag

    kareldjag Registered Member

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    hi
    Nice review and great effort as usual Mrk.
    But the main problem is to persuade Windows users to become also Linux users.
    In fact, what is the main main advantages when using Linux compared to Windows.
    I still believe that a paid subscription for maintening the distribution is necessary.
    Like Zorin, and the very recent StratOS http://techno-run.com/os-comparison-chart/ http://techno-run.com/stratos/

    Hope more and more *Nix users with your reviews and efforts.
    Rgds
     
  4. Nebulus

    Nebulus Registered Member

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    Actually, this is normal, because for an average user Linux offers almost nothing that Windows doesn't. In order to take full advantage of the benefits of Linux, you need to be prepared to spend time learning new things.

    Why do you think so? Instead of paying for maintaining a distro I believe you would spend the money better by paying for training yourself in Linux related matters.
     
  5. moontan

    moontan Registered Member

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    it's a good fit for general computing and people that don't do heavy gaming.
    the main advantage I see of Linux over Windows is that it's free.

    also, being able to update all your programs at once is a nice feature.
     
  6. TairikuOkami

    TairikuOkami Registered Member

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    The problem is, that linux does not always work as it should, too many little details, that makes it unusable. Long story short:
    Last week I bought HP255G2 and I wanted to use linux, I have tried for the whole day and in the end I ended up installing 8.

    Long story, the notebook even says, that it supports Ubuntu, but it forgets to mention, that it runs like hell, very sluggish.
    I have also tried Mint - failed to run, OpenSUSe - failed to install, but I really liked this one, Fedora - was kind of strange.
    Kubuntu - seemed like the best option, KDE has a nice GUI and it was very responsive, but it was still missing something.
    Not to mention, that is too customizable, I wanted to move icons and I have destroyed the whole taskbar, somehow.
    On the other hand, I could not resize partitions, I have downloaded gparted and even that was unable to do anything.
    Maybe there is a good distro for this one, but I do not have time to search. Windows works flawlessly out of box.

    BTW, very nice guide, but I would say, that linux should be installed by a linux professional, not by someone, like me, who knows only Windows.
    A user should just choose, what kind of GUI he wants and let the man do the work. I would not mind paying for it. I admit, when I am useless.

    I believe, that if Microsoft would change its tolerant piracy policy, people would move to linux more, it is a great OS for that price. I still have high hopes for steam OS.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2014
  7. Umbra

    Umbra Registered Member

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    you should convert your online guide to a downloadable pdf , so i can read it while using...Windows :p
     
  8. wat0114

    wat0114 Registered Member

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    Excellent guide and tremendous effort, Mrk (Mr. Ljubuncic). Thanks!
     
  9. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Out of the top drawer guide there Mrk! emailing it post haste to my neighbour who has asked me to set up a dual boot on a desktop still running XP.
    After my good experience with Xubuntu ( 14.04 is really nice and more importantly everything is working on my side ), I have decided to install it also on their PC.
    Now I wait with bated breath for a Xubuntu 14.04 LTS review.
     
  10. Veeshush

    Veeshush Registered Member

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    Again, like I said in https://www.wilderssecurity.com/threads/windows-user-wanna-try-linux-checklist.363044/ it largely depends on what the user is used to running on Windows: Can they run <insert program here> like they do with Windows and if not, what are the alternatives?

    Your guide is a good quick breakdown, but the only reason I can follow it is because I've had experience with different distros. Besides liveCDs, I wouldn't tell a first time user to install it on their main system (not even to duel boot), instead they should throw it on a secondary, less used system (like a spare laptop, or an older desktop). No one learned Windows in a day- it's something we all continue to learn about, even after 20 years of usage. Same as any other OS or any other thing we use daily (cars for instance). On a secondary system you'll have more room to get the feel down, especially if there's nothing on the hard drive they'd be afraid of losing (compared to duel booting).

    Debian is also worth a mention (it's definitely one of the larger distros)
     
  11. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    If you have a better alternative, I'm all ears.
    Mrk
     
  12. keithpeter

    keithpeter Registered Member

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    I thought the guide was a pretty good start. The only Windows users who will be using the guide are that subset that have installed Windows (as opposed to buying the machine with it pre-installed) and so familiar with drivers. And rebooting. Lots.

    Two rambling observations that may or may not help

    1) I was teaching statistics and study skills (assignment writing, referencing) to an applied science group in their first year at University some years ago. The University regulations about submission specifically state that computer failure is NOT grounds for extenuating circumstances on late submission. Much discussion ensued about horror stories, laptops going wrong, Internet connections failing &c. So the next week I demonstrated using an Ubuntu live CD session on a laptop (my old T60), showing how data on the Windows partition could be copied and how simple Word files could be edited and saved to a USB stick using Libreoffice. CDs were handed out. Some were used in anger for surfing/researching while Windows was spanner-ed. One student used the Live session/USB stick combo for a whole month before Dad came down and sorted the laptop. Just kept laptop plugged in and on suspend to ram.

    2) The puredyne project building on dynebolic. Booting off a live puredyne USB key in a sonics/audio sculpture course I took years ago kept me working (jack/ardour/looped effects/puredata) while the rest of the class watched the tutor and local tech trying to sort out Logic/Reaktor on a networked drive (hint: Logic Pro/Reaktor does NOT like networked drives - work local).

    So one way in for Windows folk would be a good live USB for emergencies. Anyone up for doing a checklist of all the live USBs? Was our Hawaiian correspondent not comparing a fairly large sample? Any suggestions for criteria for a table comparison of Live ISOs?
     
  13. mattdocs12345

    mattdocs12345 Registered Member

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    nice artilce
     
  14. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Keith, I agree. But look at this way. Someone wants to try Linux. They are willing to try a change.
    Mrk
     
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