The state of healthcare IT security: are Americans concerned enough?

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by SweX, Aug 9, 2014.

  1. SweX

    SweX Registered Member

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    http://www.welivesecurity.com/2014/08/08/healthcare-it-security-americans-concerned/
     
  2. Veeshush

    Veeshush Registered Member

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    Oh, don't even get me started. Every time a doctor tells me I can check records online I cringe.
     
  3. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Someday, not that far away, health records will include full DNA sequence :eek:
     
  4. Carver

    Carver Registered Member

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    A DNA sample is required for people in New York State who get arrested for any reason for example a protest march that gets violent or shoplifting.
     
  5. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    So New York is a police state, it seems?
     
  6. emmjay

    emmjay Registered Member

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    Isn't the whole world moving to this model?

    I understand that you if you change your primary health care provider you can request to have your existing paper bound health records not transferred. You can request them destroyed. You will be starting with the new doctor without a medical history. It is a risk especially if you have a pre-existing condition that requires monitoring. The implementation of national health care databases is a 1950s idea that started with paper and ended up electronically delivered. They are inefficient, insecure and outrageously expensive to maintain. They lend themselves to a myriad of abuses.

    A new model that embraces new technology, privacy enhancements and security is paramount. Using today's technology you could keep all your personal health records on a secured device that you wear all the time, e.g. a wristband. Hospitals and doctors could access the device with your permission or if you were unconscious. There would be no need to go online. The doctor need only review the existing info, enter his diagnosis and treatment and it would be added to your personal device. The pharmacy could access the script off the device when the patient applies for it. Individual responsibility comes down to just wearing the device. The loss of a medical license could be at issue if a patient's privacy is violated. Health insurers would need to only know what level of insurance the patient is paying for. That would be kept by the insurer, along with the patients name and current residence, thus making this data pretty much useless to hackers. Legislation could protect the patient from human resources personnel who may insist on accessing the device. Make it illegal. Other details need to be worked out but that is for the tech gurus who no doubt have the skills to make it happen. Maybe Blackberry should get out of smartphones and move into personal HC devices. :isay:
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2014
  7. Daveski17

    Daveski17 Registered Member

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    I've recently been prescribed statins as a precautionary measure after a stroke. As I use Maxthon as my primary browser I often can see some YouTube videos embedded in pages. I'm often logged into my Google account. I keep seeing advertisements about statin drugs. Is this a coincidence? I wonder ... :cautious:
     
  8. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Best wishes :)

    Well, you've probably mentioned statins in messages, right? If so, no surprise :eek:

    What's even worse is data mining from "private" feedback to physicians about their performance :mad:
     
  9. Daveski17

    Daveski17 Registered Member

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    Thanks.

    This is what has surprised me though. I don't recall ever mentioning statins in any email, including Gmail.
     
  10. Carver

    Carver Registered Member

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    How about just doing a lot of research on statins on medical sites, or posting on a medical sites forum.
     
  11. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    What about using Google to search about strokes, statins, etc?

    I wonder if Google looks at your correspondents in deciding what might interest you.
     
  12. Daveski17

    Daveski17 Registered Member

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    My primary search engines are DDG and Start Page, I rarely use the Google engine if at all. I'm guessing it's the latter, as I have corresponded once or twice with the Stroke Association. Even then though, I don't recall discussing any medication.
     
  13. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    The Stroke Association seems most likely. I vaguely recall aspirin and statins as primary stroke-related drugs, and there's no money in aspirin. You might be seeing other related ads, but maybe not so specific as particular drugs. Lifestyle maybe, especially diet?

    While this might seem benign, it's new and relatively untested drugs that have the largest advertising budgets. So patients sometimes end up with less effective treatment that costs far more. Advertising generally doesn't benefit its targets.
     
  14. Daveski17

    Daveski17 Registered Member

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    I've only noticed the statin ads, but eventually seeing related ads wouldn't surprise me.

    Yes, I agree, I'm a bit ambivalent about the efficacy of this form of targeted advertising anyway.
     
  15. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Healthcare data worth ten times price of credit card data

    http://www.welivesecurity.com/2014/09/25/healthcare-security/
     
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