The Security Risks of Third-Party Data

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by Minimalist, Sep 10, 2015.

  1. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2015/09/the_security_ri_4.html
     
  2. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    Sort of makes you feel helpless. I have surrendered any notion of true privacy/security for my REAL NAME self. I simply don't google around, etc... when I am connected to my raw ISP. Banking, real name email, and similar are totally beyond my control. Its much like emails ----- the other side of the transaction has to be responsible and safe or you will participate in their weaknesses. If my bank gets hacked it won't matter how prudent I have been my accounts are now "for sale". Truly, its the way it is.

    I assure you I have done my part on this end and all such accounts have two factor Auth with pop up alerts for anything "amiss" in the activity department. What else can we do on our end? Nothing. Enjoy life and keep moving along because its a journey to experience!!
     
  3. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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  4. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    My circumstances are similar. I do whatever providers recommend for security, of course. And I do have a perimeter firewall, which isn't that common for residential customers. But then, I've been self-employed for many years, and that's well-known to everyone who might be looking. I do use a VPN service. But that's no longer unusual where I live. Otherwise, I don't go out of my way to be secure and private. I use debit and credit cards, ATMs, register my vehicle, and so on. And I do Google for stuff, not using any VPN. But I only look for "normal" stuff. I read Google News. But I don't read Mirimir type stuff. That's an aspect of compartmentalization.
    True. But in many places, customers have limited risk exposure. Identity theft is a much tougher issue. If your accounts get sold, you just close them. You can always prove your identity better than whoever bought an account. It may take time, and the help of an attorney, but it's doable. Even if savings or investments disappear, you can sue, and will likely recover if the bank screwed up.
    Yes, for sure :)
     
  5. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Hackers are coming after your most intimate data
    http://www.businessinsider.com/hackers-are-coming-after-your-most-intimate-data-2015-9

     
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