States to FTC: Don’t pre-empt our privacy laws with yours

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by lotuseclat79, Mar 30, 2011.

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  1. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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  2. ZeroBits

    ZeroBits Registered Member

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    Hopefully other states will follow suit. We need this type of intervention more then ever.
     
  3. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    Yes and no. While the Federal government seems intent on withering away privacy period, there is an argument for having set laws in place that don't vary by state (of course that can be said for most laws, not just privacy law). As it stands, you might have a state next to you that does its best to protect the privacy of its citizens, but you live next door, in a state that is more shall we say, "corporate/business" friendly? In other words, your privacy laws may be terrible, but you cross a bridge/drive over a state line, and they are wonderful.
     
  4. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    Of course these companies want just the federal laws. They're the most "corporate and business friendly", which means they won't have to worry about restrictions and will basically get whatever they want. With different laws in the states, they'd at least have to pay attention to what they try to get away with. It's also cheaper for them to have one set of laws. Fewer officials to buy/bribe.

    When there's money to be made, the feds will always overrule the states. Don't expect either the state or feds to do anything for us, save a few symbolic gestures they can advertise. Laws aren't to protect the people. Laws and regulations are nothing more than purchased commodities intended to serve the interests of those who paid for them. You have to protect your own privacy.
     
  5. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    Point very well made.
     
  6. noone_particular

    noone_particular Registered Member

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    The internet is just one small area where our privacy has and is being taken away. At least apps like Proxomitron help us defeat a lot of their tracking methods.
    User Agent = Not your concern.
    Referrer = the same site I'm viewing, their own.
    My OS according to browser headers? It's a WinMacBSDNix. Well it's partly true, has to be one of them.

    It's finally motivated me to set up Tor. Wasn't sure it would run on my old system but it's actually doing very well. Just have to see how it does as a relay on the long haul.

    The more our privacy disappears by whatever means they can come up with, the less I want to do with modern living. Already decided that I don't need a cell phone, or plastic money, or anything with GPS, etc. Didn't need that junk for the last 30-40 years. Don't need it now. It'll be interesting to see how many can read a paper map 10 or 20 years from now. They're making cars just about do the driving for you. In not much longer, most won't be able to handle a car without traction control and all the other "advances" on anything but dry pavement. Many are scared of rear wheel drive in the snow now, not to mention terrified of no anti-lock brakes.

    What scares me is what people are giving up in addition to privacy, starting with the ability to do some of the more basic things without computer help. Describing these people as vulnerable is an major understatement. Real common sense is all but extinct and true ingenuity is close behind. Computer privacy and security trends are prime examples. If it's not a combined package that does it all for you, most don't want it or can't deal with it.

    It disgusting how many places try to get your phone number now, even on cash purchases, then sell it to some telemarketer. Then there's those store "reward cards" that give you a little bit back from the normal prices, again, tied to your phone number. I've literally had to argue with a cashier to make it clear that I didn't want one. It amazes me what people will give up for 50 cents off these 3 items. Save a buck and a half and trade peace and quiet for telemarketer calls. Then put your name on no call lists after you gave them the number in the first place.

    The only way to really protect your privacy is to get off of the modern living roller coaster and go in the direction that you want instead of the ones this world tries to push you down. It doesn't mean that you have to live like a cave man or a pioneer. Some modern things are good, like the internet. It's being caught up in the "get with the times" mentality that gets you to start trading off what really matters in exchange for something that's next to worthless or is a slight convenience. Then it snowballs. Someone cries unfair. Here come the lawmakers, which brings us back to the beginning of this thread.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2011
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