Spybots says, "Throw another log on the fire"

Discussion in 'other anti-malware software' started by HandsOff, Sep 24, 2004.

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  1. HandsOff

    HandsOff Registered Member

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    Hello,

    I am using --- Spybot - Search & Destroy version: 1.3 .1 (build: 20040801) ---
    (the beta version). I am a bit stunned and amazed by the files that it says I can, and presumably should, delete. I have always suspected that most (if not all) logs that XP creates are unnecessary. The only real familiarity that I have with the list of logs that SS&D said I could throw on the fire is that some of them always appear on my list of most fragmented files.

    wmiprov.log
    imsins.log
    SchedLgU.txt
    comsetup.log
    directx.log
    ocgen.log
    setupapi.log
    wmsetup.log
    mofcomp.log
    wbemess.lo_
    wbemess.log
    winmgmt.log
    wmiadap.log

    I went ahead and deleted all of them (a beta tester should test, right?) and so far everything is fine. Still, does anyone know why one should or should not delete them. I should mention that I do not use system restore, or save data dumps, or use disk drive indexing, run task scheduler, ect...I am hard pressed to save logs of any kind, and when i do, i certainly don't save them in the windows directory. I just ran SS&D again and only four of these logs are back for more deleting (wbemess.log, wmiprov.log, wmsetup.log, winmgmt.log).


    Curious to hear what other think. Does it make you want to run out and install 1.31?

    - HandsOff
     
  2. Paranoid2000

    Paranoid2000 Registered Member

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    Log files are routinely created and written to by several applications and subsystems of Windows. They are only needed for troubleshooting so deleting them should not cause any problems (aside from losing possibly helpful information for dealing with issues later on).

    If in doubt, open one with Notepad and see what information it holds first.
     
  3. HandsOff

    HandsOff Registered Member

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    Well,

    I suppose I was asking for trouble...by some strange coincidence after I deleted the four log files that reappeared I could no longer retrieve my e-mail.

    Let this be a word to the wise, It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, then to escape unharmed if you use Spybots Search and Destroy to delete anything aside from spyware. This is not to criticise the program which is great. I'm just saying that spyware and the handling of system files are best handled separately, IMHO. Especially H, after this. Fortunately, my backup fixed the problem.

    - HandsOff
     
  4. zcv

    zcv Registered Member

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    Don't you think you're being a might disingenuous here?

    Scanning for spyware and looking for logs are two seperate functions of SSD and have to go out of your way to look for logs.

    You're a classic exmaple of why Software people pull their hair out. "I want one program to give me all these options" but when someone makes a stupid move, its the program's fault for having the option - LOL.

    Regards - Charles
     
  5. HandsOff

    HandsOff Registered Member

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    ZCV -

    I certainly did not mean to come across as either disingenous or criticle of Spybot Search and Destroy. I meant to comment that I thought it was a great program, but it must of slipped my mind, so I will say it now. Pepikin Software's Spybot Search and Destroy is an excellent program.

    My reason for making the follow-up post was not to criticize, nor to brag about making a "stupid move". In the past I have noticed that a significant number of members here love deleting files that we have determined are clutter, just using up space, fragmenting our drives, ect... after I suffered the consequences of my action I did not want others to read my post and take it as an endorsment to do the same thing.

    In the past I have read, and possibly written that "most people do not check the 'usage tracks' box in SSDs settings \ file sets". The help file warns against non-experts doing it and so on, so I went in with my eyes open. I backed my system drive, deleted the files, and thought to soon that I was out of the woods. Just part part of learning, and hopefully someone will be spared some problems in the future as a result.

    This is sort of a long rebutal, and I did not take great offense or anything. Just want to set the record straight, so as not to cause harm to one of the two best free (or paid for) programs out there.

    The other one (as if anyone cares what I think) is JavaCool's Spyware Blaster. Just throwing that in by way of penence for any harm I may have caused.

    - HandsOff
     
  6. zcv

    zcv Registered Member

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    Hi HandsOff,

    Your post touched a nerve - I've written software. Any offense I've given, I apologise for.

    Agreed, SSD is a great program.

    Regards - Charles
     
  7. bigc73542

    bigc73542 Retired Moderator

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    HandsOff, I believe the context of your post can be useful to some beginers. Letting them know that just blindly deleting files just because a program says so is a little careless. As you were trying to convey, It pays to look at what your programs want to delete before just letting it get rid of possibly important system files just makes good sense.

    bigc
     
  8. HandsOff

    HandsOff Registered Member

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    I can see where I may look a little like someone you would not want near your computer...

    actually, I kicked off this topic with the hope that some more knowledgable folks might come along and shed a little light on what exactly these logs are, what they do, and who can or cannot do without them.

    I am very experienced in restoring XP (as you might well imagine). To fix this problem I restored my entire C:\ drive. This involves specifying target and sources, copying files rebooting, doing an sytem file system check before windows reboots, bringing up the config files, rebooting a second time so that XP will load the new (old settings), doing another system file check during the reboot, and everything is back to normal. Nine and one half minutes have ellapsed. Its annoying, but not that bad.

    Of course, if XP was completely flamed out, then I would have been looking at closer to an hour, but then at least I would have nice new xp smell from my computer. My last XP reinstall was in January, but I really don't feel as though my computer performs any slower today than it did the first day it was installed.

    I used to want to exclude certain files from defragmenting, XP logs, for instance. My reasoning was that since they are not going to be accessed at the same frequency of executables and often are just being appended then the act of defragmenting them might actually cause more harm than good. for one thing if the defragmenter is going by age of file modifications as an indicator of activity, then the stupid logs are going right to the place were your legitimate active changing files should be placed...

    Anyway, BigC, if I recall, you and most of the rest of the computing world prefer leaving defragging to XP. I can understand that, but to make a long story less long, I just am sort of interested in this type of file.

    Speaking of annoying, I frequently ask people who let xp defragment with the built in defragmenter how long it usually takes to perform this task. It's aggrivating because I get virtually the same answer every time. "I don't know, I do it right before I go to bed...." Of course, in a way that does answer the question, doesn't it?

    I was actually thinking of asking some more questions about log files, but at this point I think I had better cut my losses.


    On the other hand, if someone reading this should happen to know...




    -HandsOff
     
  9. Bubba

    Bubba Updates Team

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    Good subject Handsoff and worth continuing in my opinion. So what other questions would you like to touch on....given the info that's been shared already ?

    If your still searching for an answer about being...."a bit stunned and amazed by the files"....that Spybot says you can delete....I'll throw a caution flag concerning certain .log files....because they are all not just needed for "troubleshooting" and disagree that "deleting them should not cause any problems".

    Case in point....Adaware's install.log. If a user deletes that file....life becomes just a little more complicated when attempting to remove that program. While I agree there are many log files that can be removed safely....it is not cut and dry.
     

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    Last edited: Sep 27, 2004
  10. Paranoid2000

    Paranoid2000 Registered Member

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    OK, OK, I'll stand corrected then (I forgot about the Wise installer - good point). On the other hand, can you name an application that will not function without its .log files?

    Going OT slightly, using an uninstall utility like Total Uninstall to keep track of file/registry changes will do a better job of tidying up in many cases than the application's own installer. Since some other utilities (like CCleaner) include an option to wipe all .log files, this can be a handy backup if/when Wise throws up.
     
  11. Bubba

    Bubba Updates Team

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    Well....before reading one of HandsOff's comments....I was somewhat in agreement with You.

    o_O
     
  12. controler

    controler Guest

    BTW

    the Xp built in Defrag is a stripped down version of Diskeeper by executive
    software. found here. http://www.executive.com/coverpage.asp
    I have not tested for them in about three years now but even then Diskeeper would defrag on bootup if you wanted.
    Even daily defraging with the built in XP program is fast on a 40 gig drive.
    You really can't ask how long it takes someone to defrag. It all depends on the size of their drive or drives, and what kind of files on on their drives.
    There are many here that like other defragers. I guess I have always liked Diskeeper.
    Now as far as I knew, webmess was spyware.
    Some anti keylogging programs look to see what kind of LOG files you have
    and use that as a behaving pattern a program might have.

    Bruce
     
  13. controler

    controler Guest

    Just did a defrag of my 40 gig . it took a hole 2 min on XP Pro , built in Defrag

    Bruce
     
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