SpamFilter for MS Outlook

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by MarkW, Dec 19, 2008.

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  1. MarkW

    MarkW Registered Member

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    I'm in need of a simple, powerful spam filter that integrates into Outlook, my email client.

    I am content to pay for the software. I need something that works and works well. FWIW, I have used Open Field Software's ella for SpamControl for the past couple of years and loved it. Unfortunately, they just went out of business.

    I have read many reviews of the current crop of spam filters, but there is little in the way of internal consistency among the ratings. Your help is needed.

    Thanks for reading.
     
  2. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Hi Mark

    It depends on your needs. I use CA Anti-Spam with Outlook and it works well for me. But the caveat is that it uses a white list approach, which works for me as only about 1-2% of the email I get is from new people. In this situation it is excellent. But if 50% of your email is new business then it would be all that great.

    On the other hand I tested several of the top "smart" spam filters where you trained them on a good sample of both spam and good email. I found that they only caught about 30% of the spam, and filtered out about 30% of the good email. Not good.

    Pete
     
  3. acr1965

    acr1965 Registered Member

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  4. axial

    axial Registered Member

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    Mark, for a slightly different approach, you might want to consider using a "personal mail account" (or whatever they call it) service such as offered by LuxSci They have excellent spam filtering, and absolutely unexcelled customer service.

    [I have no affiliation, other than being a very, very satisfied customer for 4 years]
     
  5. denniz

    denniz Registered Member

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  6. MarkW

    MarkW Registered Member

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    Peter, thanks for the note. I like mailwasher, but want something a bit simpler. My wife will be using it and I don't want to trip her up. acr1965 - thank you very much. That link helps. axial and denniz, thanks for taking the time to respond. Tell me more about iHateSpam. Is it purely Bayesian or what? I cant tell from the site how it evaluates. Also, any notion of its false positive/false negative rate? Sunbelt is one of my favorite companies. CounterSpy was a moment in the sun. axial, I have to pass on the LuxSci type of acct. I need to stick with Outlook + my POP server for reasons that are boring to explain I'd like a combo of list and Bayesian learning software if I can find it.

    Anyone familiar with the SpamBayes family of plug-in/addin filters? I'm looking at InBoxer along with some others to plug into Outlook 2007.

    What are your opinions?

    Take care.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2008
  7. denniz

    denniz Registered Member

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    iHateSpam is mostly community based and it uses the same technology also used in the anti-spam software from the very highly reputated Cloudmark. Millions of emails are judged by the community, this community also consists of millions of people. The more people who decide that certain emails are spam, the higher the chance it gets blocked. Individual members get a higher trust rating when judging spam if there decision is in-line or in agreement with the rest of the community. The other way around, a members trust rating will drop when they often rate emails "wrongly", so when they often allow emails from which the larger community thinks they are spam. The decisions that members with a high trust rating make will put in more weight on the community decisions as a whole, while people with a very low trust rating will hardly effect the community decisions. When only very few people judge an email as spam, then it won't get blocked.

    In practice this system works very good. Personal emails never get blocked, subscription based newsletters (the ones that people really subscribe for) almost never get blocked. All the real spam almost always get blocked, with very little false positives. It integrates with a small toolbar in Outlook, where it sits very quietly. Almost no user interaction is required, if certain spam isn't blocked, then with the press of a button you can block it. If genuine emails get blocked, then you can unblock it with the press of a button. If you don't agree with the community based decision whether or not certain email is genuine or spam, then you have the option of adding or removing it from your local black and white lists, which overrides the community decision on you computer.

    This may all sound every complicated, but it's actually so simple, that my grandmother could use it.

    Here is a review for iHateSpam: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2280345,00.asp

    Here is a review for Cloudmark Desktop from which iHateSpam is based on: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2279963,00.asp
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2008
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