Soo many distro's

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by Kyle1420, Apr 29, 2013.

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  1. Kyle1420

    Kyle1420 Registered Member

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    There are soo many linux distro's\variants...

    What's your opinion on this?
    Strength? Weakness? or both...?
     
  2. new2security

    new2security Registered Member

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    Several hundreds of them yes, but most of them are based on quite few "mother distros", such as Debian, Red Hat etc.

    But I agree the Linux is too fragmented.
     
  3. AlexC

    AlexC Registered Member

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    The fact that there are so many distros is because Linux is free and open-source... so it couldn't be any other way. And the fact that is free and open source, makes Linux be used in much more than just personal computers. So, in the question of globally evaluating Linux "strength" or "weakness", i would say that the existence of many or few distros for PC´s is irrelevant. It only uses who wants to, and for free.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
  4. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Take a D'n'D 20-face cube.
    Go to DistroWatch.
    Mark the top 20.
    Roll the cube.

    Or, if you have an ordinary cube, top six.

    That's the best advice for anyone who wants to explore.

    If you want the most comprehensive newbie-package - Linux Mint.

    Mrk
     
  5. kdcdq

    kdcdq Registered Member

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    OK, I'm a newbie to Unix.o_O Do any particular desktop and Mint distributions come recommended as well?
     
  6. moontan

    moontan Registered Member

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    it depends how old your computer is.

    if you have a computer older than 4 years then i would go with XFCE.

    if you have a newer computer you can try the other flavors: KDE, Cinnamon or MATE.

    i run a newer computer and i still prefer XFCE.
    but your mileage may vary.
     
  7. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    if you are new to linux go for ubuntu or linux mint as ease of use ;)

    on core both are same difference is only looks Ubuntu come with unity(desktop environment) where as linux mint come with cinnamon(desktop environment) same with xubuntu its comes with xfce (desktop environment) kubuntu kde (desktop environment)


    http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/linux-mint-nadia-high-end.html

    http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/reviews/ubuntu-13-04-review-spot-the-difference

    also you can check reviews on youtube and sites and make your mind

    http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=ubuntu

    http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=mint
     
  8. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    LOL

    i am 10 years old system i use Ubuntu and SL formating soon to ubuntu 13.04 and SL as fuduntu drop support

    anything core 2 duo + and 2+GB ram go with what ever you like best ans is what best for you ;)
     
  9. new2security

    new2security Registered Member

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    If your computer is couple of years old, I'd avoid Gnome, KDE etc. They're too resource hungry IMO and feel more like an infected XP system on a single core with 512 mb ram. Go for LXDE whenever possible, it's very light and snappy. Or XFCE.
     
  10. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    If you have the bandwidth, I'd suggest downloading all of the Mint varieties and give each live dvd a look to see which you like best. I did that with Mint 13 and got Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce and KDE, then decided I liked Cinnamon best, and Xfce a close 2nd. There are others too, but those are the ones I looked at myself. But best advice is to try them all and see which you prefer.

    Keep in mind too, that with Mint, v13 (LTS) is supported till 2017, which is fantastic. The others, v14 etc, are supported for less time. So choose to fit your needs and/or desires.
     
  11. wat0114

    wat0114 Registered Member

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    XFCE Linux mint is pretty much what I settled on last time I used linux. Very nice on an old computer :)
     
  12. new2security

    new2security Registered Member

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    Or why not Sabayon Linux. Based on the hardcore & geekish distro Gentoo but the Sabayon devs hold your hand all the way during installation and post-installation. It's a rolling distro, so you just keep updating the packages / apps on your system (usually there are couple of new packages / day) and you get bleeding edge software every day. No need for major version upgrades every 18 months (or whatever), that often are associated with headache and system meltdown.

    It's been quite stable and so far no problems at all.
     
  13. AlexC

    AlexC Registered Member

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    With YUMI you can try different distros from one USB :)
     
  14. wilbertnl

    wilbertnl Registered Member

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    Soo many cars too!!! Soo many cable channels... And did you notice all these different restaurants? :)

    I think that most distro's differ mostly in looks, there are only few that make innovative progress.
    I think those are the distro's that really matter, but it might be more convenient to select some user friendly spin-off.

    Anyway, You might prefer bacon cheese burgers, while I like Asian food better.
     
  15. Fox Mulder

    Fox Mulder Registered Member

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    All Linux distros are the same at heart. They all use the Linux kernel. The difference is what other software they package along with it.

    What distro is best for you depends on what you intend on using it for.

    Debian is an extremely popular distribution that is very stable and modular. It will work out of the box but you need some Linux knowledge to get the most out of it.

    Ubuntu and Linux Mint are derivatives of Debian, designed to be more user friendly. I believe Ubuntu and Mint contain "non-free" software, e.g., software without redistributable source code. This improves compatibility but bothers some. Linux Mint is intended to be a lighter version of Ubuntu.

    Fedora is also a very user friendly distribution, but it places a greater emphasis on cutting-edge software. I believe it also uses non-free drivers, so it's also a good pick for compatibility. Fedora is also incredibly secure out-of-the-box.

    So basically: the easiest is Ubuntu, but it's a bit bloated. Linux Mint is also easy and slightly faster. Fedora is also a good choice. Debian is a good pick if you want to learn Linux.
     
  16. Kyle1420

    Kyle1420 Registered Member

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    :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:
     
  17. WSFuser

    WSFuser Registered Member

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    Definitely both. No single distro would be able to satisfy all needs; however, at the same time there are a bunch of distrolets that tend to only modify the default applications or settings of the parent distro. Such changes could possibly shipped using just a custom repo and/or package.
     
  18. Wild Hunter

    Wild Hunter Former Poster

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    The relevant ones have support from billionaires.

    The others are just hobbies of individual devs.
     
  19. chrisretusn

    chrisretusn Registered Member

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    Both. There strength is you can generally find one that fits you. The weakness is finding it. I got lucky I found mine years ago, it was Slackware. Back in those days there wasn't a huge selection.

    I'll second the motion on Mint and add PCLinuxOS as both good for beginners.
     
  20. merisi

    merisi Registered Member

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    I've tried out a few versions of Linux and I always go back to Ubuntu as I find it the easiest to use and I really like their forums. Ubuntu 12.04 is the one I'd pick at the moment.
     
  21. kdcdq

    kdcdq Registered Member

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    Thanks to EVERYone that provided insight on Unix flavors for a newbie. I am going to try out Mint, Ubuntu, and PcLinuxOS here soon...:)
     
  22. bonedriven

    bonedriven Registered Member

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    openSUSE 12.3 is pretty good too, especially if you like KDE, which can be tweaked much to suit your need.

    I've tried Ubuntu for sometime, and finally come to openSUSE, mostly because of KDE, and YAST too.
     
  23. snerd

    snerd Registered Member

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    I grew tired of the merry-go-round............... put Linux Mint 14 Cinnamon on last year and am very happy.
     
  24. new2security

    new2security Registered Member

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    A word of caution though - make sure the distro you'll be installing isn't going to migrate to systemd anytime soon. A major system change such as the implementation of Systemd can potentially break things and could render your system unusable. This is one of the negative aspects of using Linux - things evolve too quickly and imo, as in case with Systemd, for the majority of users, is rather unnecessary.
     
  25. Baserk

    Baserk Registered Member

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    Ubuntus lousy refusal to fix a bug that causes it to not work on certain processors; reading them as non-PAE while they are perfectly fit to run the most recent linux stuff, makes Mint a no-go also on an old thinkpad.
    Going from Fuduntu to Fedora XFCE was a shocker.
    In the end everything works, really not ootb though. VLC/Chromium/Dropbox? You''ll retrieve your inner terminal-jockey, you'll just have to.
    The setup is tantalizing. During partitioning, Fedora tricks you into thinking 'Did I just completely miss a 'Manual partitioning' option?' It looks like 1 option only; 'Use Drive'.
    Expect a 'Confirm/Yes/Agree/Next' button in the lower-right? With F18 you can expect it upper-left. That sort of stuff.
    Everything sorts out during setup eventually though, it's just very unpolished.
    Fedora 18/Spherical Cow is not recommended for beginners imo
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2013
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