Shadow Defender and SSD

Discussion in 'sandboxing & virtualization' started by nozzle, Jun 19, 2014.

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  1. nozzle

    nozzle Registered Member

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    Simple question: Will using Shadow Defender's write to cache prevent writes on my SSD?

    Thanks,
    nozzle
     
  2. nozzle

    nozzle Registered Member

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    Never mind. I found the answer.

    take care,
    nozzle
     
  3. sdmod

    sdmod Shadow Defender Expert

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    and the answer was?
     
  4. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    I would like to know that also. Could you please tell us the answer?
     
  5. nozzle

    nozzle Registered Member

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    I found this on Shadow Defender's Facebook page:

    "I started a little experiment recently, to see how well Shadow Defender handles its RAM cache. I have 16GB or RAM total on my laptop and out of that I have assigned 4GB to the SD RAM cache. The laptop has been on for 78 hours now with C in Shadow Mode, which means that all operating system writes that would normally hit the disk are hitting RAM instead. It looks like the RAM cache part of the SD code is extremely well-written! I have been using the laptop as normal during the last 3 days and nights, and the SD RAM cache usage has only just reached the 1.4GB mark.This is 1.4GB of temporary files generated by the operating system during the last 78 hours, files that would normally hit the real disk. Further proof that regular usage of a RAM cache for your shadowed disks will most definitely prolong their lives, saving them from a lot of unnecessary everyday OS writes."

    "Actually assigning even just 2GB of RAM to the SD cache should give you at the very least 4 days of normal operation, directing all the temporary crap that Windows creates on every session to RAM and saving your real disks from all those write hits. And when the cache is nearly full you can just reboot to refresh it. This way your C drive will always stay "in RAM", with all the speed and data security benefits this entails. Just make sure you don't start copying big files to your shadowed disks when the RAM cache is enabled. Such usage will fill the cache quite quickly because everything you copy to the disk will not hit the actual disk but will be directed to RAM instead. If you need to make big changes to shadowed disks you should take them out of Shadow Mode first, add or remove the files you want, and then put them back on Shadow Mode. This way the SD RAM cache won't fill up quickly and you'll get many hours of continuous normal operation, without the need to reboot in order to refresh it."

    I believe this answers my question.
    nozzle
     
  6. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    @nozzle Thank you for this explanation.
     
  7. caspian

    caspian Registered Member

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    I do a lot of downloading so I guess this wouldn't work for me. But in the Administration tab I have checked "encrypt write cache". So that should at least guarantee some privacy.......maybe. If it actually does what it says.
     
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