Security Suite Versus Separate Components

Discussion in 'other anti-malware software' started by Dennis7, May 6, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Dennis7

    Dennis7 Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2009
    Posts:
    7
    I am sure this question has been asked many times before, but I would like to know what the experts in this forum have to say about it!

    My question is, are you better off getting a full SECURITY SUITE of a particular top software company, or cherry picking the best of breed components for antivirus, spyware, and firewall protection? What are the pro's and con's.

    Please be fair and give me your unbiased answer. (Just don't reply get ESET SMART SECURITY because this is their forum, etc. etc.)

    Thank you!
     
  2. Antarctica

    Antarctica Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Posts:
    1,617
    Location:
    Canada
  3. TrojanHunter

    TrojanHunter Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Posts:
    151
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    The advantage of Security suites, is that you know everything included is compatible. Separate programs have the advantage of being able to pick each individual program, best suited for the users needs.

    I personally have a preference for security suites :)
     
  4. jmonge

    jmonge Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Posts:
    12,883
    Location:
    Canada
    agree with you plus it is more expensive if you have to pay for each application:) at this moment i am using a security package from my internet provider for me is free and it's antivirus engine is kav antivirus:thumb:
     
  5. fax

    fax Registered Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2005
    Posts:
    3,728
    Location:
    localhost
    Got fed-up to keep fixing conflicts and incompatibilities at every update of my "best of each" (best AV, best firewall, best AS, etc...).

    So now running happily with just a suite (since years) and it works!
    Faster PC, never been infected and less BSOD

    Of course... choose a good suite :)

    Fax
     
  6. NoIos

    NoIos Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Posts:
    607
    If you pay for something...go and get the best thing you can buy with your money. Suites often have a strong component and the rest is weaker. For sure suites cost cheaper and you have no incompatibilities issues, but if you want the best for every sector of your security you have to buy different products.
     
  7. the Tester

    the Tester Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2002
    Posts:
    2,854
    Location:
    The Gateway to the Blue Hills,WI.
    I like to "cherry pick" from various programs.
    One way of looking at this way of securing your pc is that you can overlap or layer some programs within reason.
    I wouldn't want to rely on one developer to cover all of the bases. There is bound to be at least one weak spot.
     
  8. sded

    sded Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2004
    Posts:
    512
    Location:
    San Diego CA
    I like separate components, because I am looking for specific features in components that a suite doesn't satisfy. Support to mobile use is a main concern, but not a major concern of most suites. The latest issue of Consumer Reports, of all places, rates Eset as #1 in the suites, but I still don't use it-the other majors are very close, though, and firewalls are not rated. There is a table of how the detailed features stack up that might be useful to some. Take that, PC Magazine! :) The CU preferred free suite, BTW, is Avira, Windows Defender, and Spamfighter (which is the highest rated of all the components). YMMV.
     
  9. Victek

    Victek Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2007
    Posts:
    5,121
    Location:
    USA
    .
    I use Norton Internet Security 2009 because it has the lowest impact on system resources of any suite I've used, installs (and uninstalls) very quickly, and is very affordable - comes with a three PC license and is often on sale. I feel NIS 2009 gives me good general coverage. I added Zemana AntiLogger for dedicated keylogger protection. Perhaps it would be even better to use a sandbox in conjunction with NIS, but at the moment I don't want the extra complexity.

    My point is you can use a suite and still add a best of breed app for additional protection. As long as you choose carefully you won't create too much system overhead, and you can keep license costs down.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.